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Reverse Engineering the Macintosh LC III Logicboard

mmu_man

Well-known member
Looks like you'll have to file the 96-pin one and cut into a 21-pin to get the 18-pin extension… Maybe a hot-wire would work for that.
 

LightBulbFun

Well-known member
its very awesome to see the home made LCIII board is finally working/booting :)

it really has been awesome to see all the reverse engineering going on here, some proper hard work by some very skilled people!

I look forward to further progress and seeing what else gets done in the future :)
 

max1zzz

Well-known member
Do you plan on publishing the files someday? Along with some netlist RE it would be useful in OpenBoardView for troubleshooting existing boards…
Yes, Once the board has been finalized (and hopefully a few sold to recoup my costs) the layout files will be published
Do you recall who that was?
I fount this attempt at REing their format but it's not finished. I was looking into adding import for OpenBoardView…
I don't i'm afraid, it was a very breif discuassion I saw on the RetroTinkering discord server some months ago
 

trag

Well-known member
Looks like you'll have to file the 96-pin one and cut into a 21-pin to get the 18-pin extension… Maybe a hot-wire would work for that.

Perhaps a Dremel-type tool on a mount with a "diamond" cutting wheel?

I've used that set up to separate paired 30-pin SIMM sockets.
 

Trash80toHP_Mini

NIGHT STALKER
Easiest way to do it is with a razor saw from X-Acto or preferably, a pull stroke fine cutting Japanese type flush cut/dovetailing saw. Three 96pin slots make two 130pin slots.

When buying "96" position slots, make sure all 96 pins are implemented. It's easy to wind up with only two rows/64 pins on useless connectors.
 
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