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RaSCSI Development Thread

Does WLAN support mean you can use Pi’s wifi? Have you tried transferring AppleShare over AppleTalk? I had some issues with Scuznet AppleShare over AppleTalk over wifi but never went back to try to sort it out.

Yes, and yes. AppleShare over AppleTalk (DDP) works perfectly over as long as your kernel has the appletalk module loaded. See the wiki page that I linked in my previous post above.

The one thing that doesn't work great, is using Netatalk in parallel with RaSCSI on the same Pi Zero W over an emulated DaynaPort network adapter on a slow Mac. If you try to copy files on the AppleShare over the emulated network interface, it will stall indefinitely on my SE. I think it is a Pi Zero performance bottleneck. A faster Pi handles this perfectly fine.
 

superjer2000

Well-known member
Sorry, I should have been more clear. I had success downloading from an AppleShare server but uploading files (ie copying to a server) on Wifi had issues that I believe were timing related.
 
Sorry, I should have been more clear. I had success downloading from an AppleShare server but uploading files (ie copying to a server) on Wifi had issues that I believe were timing related.
Sorry, just to be absolutely clear: Is it the AppleShare server itself that is connected over wifi, the Mac that's connecting to the AppleShare server, or both?
And BTW, this is getting off topic as far as RaSCSI is concerned so I'd suggest you start a new thread!
 

superjer2000

Well-known member
Sorry, just to be absolutely clear: Is it the AppleShare server itself that is connected over wifi, the Mac that's connecting to the AppleShare server, or both?
And BTW, this is getting off topic as far as RaSCSI is concerned so I'd suggest you start a new thread!
No, no reason to start a new thread. I’m just trying to first confirm what WLAN support for Daynaport means. I am assuming you can plug RaSCSI into a computer and access your network over wifi (ie no Ethernet cable). For better clarity, plug RaSCSI into a PowerBook at your kitchen table with nothing going into the pi other than power, can the PowerBook connect to the the internet and AppleShare servers on the rest of the network using the Daynaport emulation?

From the wiki you linked it seems like maybe this isn’t what was meant.

EDIT: found the part of the wiki that indicates it will do the above. The question then was whether there are any issues uploading to an AppleShare server on a network from the PowerBook connected over wifi in the above example. AppleTalk over wifi can be finicky.
 
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No, no reason to start a new thread. I’m just trying to first confirm what WLAN support for Daynaport means. I am assuming you can plug RaSCSI into a computer and access your network over wifi (ie no Ethernet cable). For better clarity, plug RaSCSI into a PowerBook at your kitchen table with nothing going into the pi other than power, can the PowerBook connect to the the internet and AppleShare servers on the rest of the network using the Daynaport emulation?

From the wiki you linked it seems like maybe this isn’t what was meant.

EDIT: found the part of the wiki that indicates it will do the above. The question then was whether there are any issues uploading to an AppleShare server on a network from the PowerBook connected over wifi in the above example. AppleTalk over wifi can be finicky.
There is one major limitation with how wifi over the RaSCSI Daynaport emulation works at the moment, in that it relies on NAT to translate network traffic between the emulated interface and the rest of the internet. Due to (deliberate for security reasons) limitations in the Linux networking stack, you're bound to a private network between the host Pi and the Mac, and will only be able to access AppleTalk resources running on the Pi itself. You will *not* have access to AppleTalk resources elsewhere on your local network. This is documented in the RaSCSI wiki page on this topic.

Now, there may be ways around this as there's nothing in RaSCSI code itself that's holding back wifi networking. Perhaps a Linux networking guru can help us find a way. :)
 
Small addendum to the above: I was talking about AFP over DDP (AppleTalk) in particular. AFP over TCP most likely works fine over NAT, but I haven't tested it yet.
 

jcs

New member
Is it just mine or does the RaSCSI run exceptionally hot? Even when it's not passing any traffic, the row of chips on the top of the board is too hot to touch. The Raspberry Pi it's attached to runs fairly cool.
 

robin-fo

Active member
Is it just mine or does the RaSCSI run exceptionally hot? Even when it's not passing any traffic, the row of chips on the top of the board is too hot to touch. The Raspberry Pi it's attached to runs fairly cool.
It's the same on my RaSCSI...
 

landoGriffin

Well-known member
I've observed the same thing. Just sitting idle, the chips do get pretty warm. However, I've used them for long periods of time without having any issues. Have you guys measured the temperature of the chips?

The operating temperature in the data sheet is 0 to 70 degrees C. As long as they're staying under 70 C, they should be fine.

1637200195345.png
 

Tom2112

Well-known member
I think I'll put a row of those little Raspberry Pi heatsinks on the RaSCSI chips. That'll probably help with longevity.
 

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