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Kendall's Collection and Finds!

khannonnd

Well-known member
A friend of mine who found out I was a fan of older Apple products gave me a stack of Post-It -type notes in the form of the Mac!  He says he got this at an Apple event in the early 80s.  

Mac Post Its.JPG

 

khannonnd

Well-known member
My friend was also, apparently, a very active member of BMUG and was responsible for putting together their CDs.  He gave me copies of a 1995, 1996, and 1997 BMUG CD.  No idea what is on these -- will have to check them out!

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Carboy7

Well-known member
Wish I had friends like you do.

My friends either criticize me for having vintage equipment or just don't care when I tell them about the wonders of Mac OS 9.2. (seriously :p )

 

CC_333

Well-known member
My friends are basically very easy going. Earlier this year, for instance, a friend went and bought me a boxed copy of Windows 98 SE (neither Mac nor hardware, but it is vintage).

I usually don't get much in the way of whole machines though (the husband of that same friend has a *complete-in-box* 128k AND a *complete-in-box* Plus WITH an ImageWriter I, but he's a hoarder and won't let go of any of it :( . I keep nagging him on occasion, but he won't budge (I'll keep trying, though; I can be very tenacious about such things)).

Someday....

c

 

khannonnd

Well-known member
My wife's uncle found out I was a fan of vintage Apple equipment so he sent some boxes over.  A complete, working, Apple IIc machine, complete with all the manuals, a joystick, something apple branded called a "modulator," an ImageWriter, and some sealed 5.25 inch floppy disks!  He bought these things new back in the 80s and they have been living in his garage for a few decades.  I now have two fully functional IIc setups!

The IIc had the Jeopardy game inside.  I don't know about you, but I think Ethel is on something...

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dcr

Well-known member
. . . something apple branded called a "modulator," . . .
My guess is that would be an RF modulator to use a television set as a monitor.  You'd connect to the antenna input on the television set and set it to channel 3 or 4 (set on the modulator) and the TV is a computer monitor.

 

EvilCapitalist

Well-known member
My wife's uncle found out I was a fan of vintage Apple equipment so he sent some boxes over.  A complete, working, Apple IIc machine, complete with all the manuals, a joystick, something apple branded called a "modulator," an ImageWriter, and some sealed 5.25 inch floppy disks!  He bought these things new back in the 80s and they have been living in his garage for a few decades.  I now have two fully functional IIc setups!
Congrats on the new IIc!  Always nice to get things from original owners who had some pride in ownership.

The IIc had the Jeopardy game inside.  I don't know about you, but I think Ethel is on something...
Ohhh, 80s hair styles!  The people in the NES version have some quality facial expressions when they get an answer right (usually, smugness) or wrong (mix between shock and being rather PO'd).  You have to wonder if the programmer was chuckling at seeing the finished product.

 

khannonnd

Well-known member
Huge haul today. The attached picture shows just some of it. I need to go back next week to get the rest. This is an Apple collection a pair of college professors (one of whom has since passed) accumulated over the years. Everything is in *pristine* condition. When all is said and done, it will include:

- Two Macintosh Pluses (with keyboard/mouse), one of which has some upgrade that lets it use an external Radius two page display. Also came with the Radius external display.
- A IIsi, keyboard, mouse, and monitor (PRAM battery has not exploded and was safely extricated)
- PowerMac 7200
- A 400mhz Pismo
- Two 500mhz Apple Cubes, 20 inch monitors, keyboards, mice (one has a CD-RW and a GeForce 2 card, the other has a DVD drive).
- *four* sets of Apple Cube speakers with the foam completely in tact
- Various boxed software items.
- Boxed Iomega ZIP drive
- Powerbook G3 battery charger and three pismo batteries
- an HP Laserwriter


Because I need more systems like I need a hole in my head, I will be looking to sell most if not all of these items-- preferably to someone in the bay area...
 

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khannonnd

Well-known member
I’m picking up the Cinema Display, peripherals, radius full page display, and other stuff next week!
 

khannonnd

Well-known member
One of my new Mac Pluses driving the Radius Full Page Display. Pretty cool - I have never seen a compact mac driving an external display before...
 

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Garrett

Well-known member
The Mobius 030 accelerator in my SuperSE (along with many other accelerators and other upgrade cards for the SE) have display outputs, but I never knew that was a thing with the Plus. Is it an internal card (if so, I wonder how it "interfaces" since there's no expansion port in the Plus) or something external?
 

khannonnd

Well-known member
The Mobius 030 accelerator in my SuperSE (along with many other accelerators and other upgrade cards for the SE) have display outputs, but I never knew that was a thing with the Plus. Is it an internal card (if so, I wonder how it "interfaces" since there's no expansion port in the Plus) or something external?

It is definitely an internal card. The port has been "hacked" into the place where a security cable normally would go. I am loathe to open it up to look because I have no idea how the card fits in there and I don't want to damage it...
 

khannonnd

Well-known member
Here are some pictures of the connectors:
 

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Garrett

Well-known member
It is definitely an internal card. The port has been "hacked" into the place where a security cable normally would go. I am loathe to open it up to look because I have no idea how the card fits in there and I don't want to damage it...
That's what I was thinking but wasn't sure. Is there also a memory or processor expansion in there, or is it strictly external display?

I know many of the early cards were hacked into the processor slot and some other things. Kinda incredible when you think about it.

Either way, congrats! I need to find an external display to use with my SuperSE, but the card there uses a non-standard (at least now) display port. I found instructions way back for getting it to work with a modern VGA display, but have since lost those instructions.
 

Garrett

Well-known member
I am not even sure how to check for a processor upgrade without cracking the thing open...
In my case, there were extra control panels installed for the accelerator card. Another dead giveaway might be more than 4 MB of memory, which was how I first found out about the 030 accelerator in my SuperSE. (Besides all of the 50+ extensions and the strange "custom" boot screen.)

With that said, I'm not even sure if an accelerator card was ever made for the Plus. I'd assume some third-party company did at some point, but it would've been a more "advanced" or difficult upgrade than the accelerators found on later Macs with expansion ports.

And that's a tight fit and a strange video connection. Good thing you got the monitor that goes with it.
 

Daniël

Well-known member
With that said, I'm not even sure if an accelerator card was ever made for the Plus. I'd assume some third-party company did at some point, but it would've been a more "advanced" or difficult upgrade than the accelerators found on later Macs with expansion ports.

They did, and it's not necessarily more advanced. As a matter of fact, accelerators exist that had the same PCB for the Mac Plus, SE and Classic, with different connectors soldered on for each configuration. Remember that the PDS is basically exactly what it says, a slot directly wired to the processor. Many of the signals on the PDS are directly or indirectly from the CPU itself. So, it doesn't take a ton of work to make an accelerator for a non-PDS 68000 Mac, it just needs a special connector, the Killy Clip, to clip the accelerator onto the CPU itself, and tap into the signals there. That's how accelerators worked prior to the introduction of the PDS slot on the SE.

An example is MicroMac's line of Performer and PerformerPro accelerators. They used a single PCB that would have the appropriate connectors and other components soldered on for the specific configuration. The SE would have the PDS connector populated, the Plus would have a DIP Killy Clip, and the Classic a PLCC Killy Clip (not sure if these were the Killy brand, but it's the same concept). It also had a floppy connector passthrough on the Classic configuration, as the PCB would otherwise block the port entirely.

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