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Share your Apple Quicktake 100/150/200 Photos here!

wanderingjew

Well-known member
This program has several zoom options + settings in each option. I just took the automatic. In other variants, you can make sharper or play with the settings. You can add a little noise in Photoshop for sharpness. In any case, the result is much better than simple scaling in Photoshop - tested)

Okay, this is amazing. Feel free to experiment with any of my images.

In the meantime, this is what I'm working on. It's modifying a QT150 for Nikon lenses. The crop factor is about 6x compared to what this lens is usually attached to, so there are going to be some _really long_ shots I'm planning for this.

FX9ndYcUcAAM3R4.jpg
 

warmech

Well-known member
Okay, this is amazing. Feel free to experiment with any of my images.

In the meantime, this is what I'm working on. It's modifying a QT150 for Nikon lenses. The crop factor is about 6x compared to what this lens is usually attached to, so there are going to be some _really long_ shots I'm planning for this.
Nice! Any chance you'd be willing to share the STLs or models (assuming that's how you've done it)? I'd love to adapt that to EF or MFT; nothing says stupid like slapping a 16mm cine lens on a 640x480 digital camera!
 

wanderingjew

Well-known member
Nice! Any chance you'd be willing to share the STLs or models (assuming that's how you've done it)? I'd love to adapt that to EF or MFT; nothing says stupid like slapping a 16mm cine lens on a 640x480 digital camera!
It's actually not much, and the important part (the metal part that holds the nikon lens) can't be 3D printed. You basically have to take apart a Nikon mount.

Other than that, it's just taking the camera apart and putting it back together in a totally different way. Here's a graphic that shows what's going on, although I'll need to print something thinner than the current C-mount to Nikon adapter. The important part is getting the face of the nikon mount to be 46.5mm forward of the sensor.

FXu2ZfOVsAAQs_T.png
 

akator70

Well-known member
This panorama was taken with a QuickTake back in 1996 and assembled in Photoshop. I did a bunch of others back then but have since long lost the images.1996.04-18th and Main.jpg
 

Daniël

Well-known member
Finally got to use my QuickTake 200... without buying a 5V card.
Instead, I got crafty and designed something myself, a hybrid 5V+3.3V 4MB card based on a Toshiba NAND from the SmartMedia era (another P/N listed in the datasheet is actually a 3.3V SMC), as shown off here:


Good news is that it electrically works, bad news is I forgot the non-notched side is used for detecting a card insertion, so card readers and the QT200 couldn't detect the card 🙃

As I figured out my QT200 has a few dead pixels, I decided to just disconnect one of the sensor pins (there is a short if no card is inserted, when the connection's broken the camera considers a card to be inserted). Not too dangerous, as the QT200 will shut off if you open the card slot door anyways (if not, pulling it out could cause short circuits). It also kept tripping the write protect sensor, despite no conductive material being where the WP sticker goes on a SmartMedia card, so I just removed that sensor as I don't plan to use that feature. I know, sacrilegious hardware modifications galore :p

I also found out I needed a SmartMedia card reader with a specific chipset that could run a Windows 98 era utility called SMPREP.EXE, which both formats the card, and writes the Card Information System header, which cameras use to ID a card. Ended up getting an Olympus MA-USB2, which works with it. Also needed to hack it, long term I could just wire the 3.3V/right side up sensor and 5V/wrong side up sensor together, and have my PCB notched for 5V, so the 5V cameras don't need mods to detect the card.

Anyways, I did end up being able to take photos on the QT200 and transferring them over after that kerfuffle, so have some cat pictures:

DSC00008.JPG
DSC00002.JPG
 

Phipli

Well-known member
Finally got to use my QuickTake 200... without buying a 5V card.
Instead, I got crafty and designed something myself, a hybrid 5V+3.3V 4MB card based on a Toshiba NAND from the SmartMedia era (another P/N listed in the datasheet is actually a 3.3V SMC), as shown off here:


Good news is that it electrically works, bad news is I forgot the non-notched side is used for detecting a card insertion, so card readers and the QT200 couldn't detect the card 🙃

As I figured out my QT200 has a few dead pixels, I decided to just disconnect one of the sensor pins (there is a short if no card is inserted, when the connection's broken the camera considers a card to be inserted). Not too dangerous, as the QT200 will shut off if you open the card slot door anyways (if not, pulling it out could cause short circuits). It also kept tripping the write protect sensor, despite no conductive material being where the WP sticker goes on a SmartMedia card, so I just removed that sensor as I don't plan to use that feature. I know, sacrilegious hardware modifications galore :p

I also found out I needed a SmartMedia card reader with a specific chipset that could run a Windows 98 era utility called SMPREP.EXE, which both formats the card, and writes the Card Information System header, which cameras use to ID a card. Ended up getting an Olympus MA-USB2, which works with it. Also needed to hack it, long term I could just wire the 3.3V/right side up sensor and 5V/wrong side up sensor together, and have my PCB notched for 5V, so the 5V cameras don't need mods to detect the card.

Anyways, I did end up being able to take photos on the QT200 and transferring them over after that kerfuffle, so have some cat pictures:

DSC00008.JPG
DSC00002.JPG
Nice work, and nice cats :)

Is the notch / detection fixable in a V2?
 

Daniël

Well-known member
Is the notch / detection fixable in a V2?
Yes, by notching it for 5V. That does require a mod on the card reader (if it's a 3.3V model), by isolating one of the pins on the sensor for 5V or wrong side up detection, and jumper wiring it to the same pin on the 3.3V right side up detection sensor.

That way, it'll properly detect the card without needing to short the pins permanently, which is risky as pulling the card out would not disable the power and data lines, potentially shorting stuff out. It'll of course get a wrong reading if a 3.3V card is inserted upside down, or a 5V card is inserted, but the worst thing that happens in that case is just a card error if it's attempted to be accessed.
 

MindWalker

Well-known member
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