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  2. Innes

    Recent spike in PPC Mac prices?

    Prices in the UK for these things seem to be fairly stable at the moment. A 800mhz TiBook in decent nick went for 80 quid recently and Pismos also seem to be between 80 and 90. AlBooks are ranging from 20 to 70, and no-one wants the white iBooks. I actually won one for 99p last month and messaged the seller saying 'hey, i'd be pissed if this happened to me, feel free to cancel it'. The only ones selling (selling mind, not just listed) above 150 are the clamshells, which as far as I'm concerned are the least deserving of it. If any of the other laptop models came in different colours then I should think that would have put a premium on those too as everyone brought them all for their shelf. Its interesting that you post this now, as iv found that Jan and Feb seem to have lower prices in general. I figured this was down to more people listing things after Christmas to try and scrape back a few funds, and less people bidding for pretty much the same reason
  3. A few days ago they gave me an original Apple 20 external HD as in the picture. With the HD I also have the terminator and the scsi cable. In the absence of documentation, I don't know where the terminator (below or above?), and the connector, goes. Then there is a number near the connectors where it is currently set to 5. Can you tell me the exact configuration? If everything goes smoothly, once the computer starts, will it automatically recognize the HD? Thank you
  4. Cory5412

    Recent spike in PPC Mac prices?

    With the caveat that I'm not actively watching ebay, and haven't really for several years - I'm not surprised by this at all, and, I suspect we only have a couple years before early Intel machines do this too, so if anyone thinks they have an early Intel machine they'll want to have gotten cheap a few years ago, just go ahead and pick it up today. It seems like the value of old tech follows a sort of a trough curve. Something is built and then it's valuable as a new/fast/current/modern piece of technology with a working life ahead of it. Then, the piece of tech does its working life and around the end of that working life, its value drops to zero pretty quickly. The value stays at zero and there's this period where the thing is too new to be interesting but also more or less too old to be useful (The Great Plateau is making this phase a little weird because a lot of stuff, at least as far as generic x86-based computers sold for Windows/Linux/Unix go, from 10+ years ago still competently runs current software versions). (Macs also get weird here mostly because there's only one official/supported vendor for Mac hardware, and so you have Macs from 2013 that fetch 2-5x what a generic OEM or self-built system from that time will. And then, during that low period, people toss things because they take up space and they can't really find people to take them. After enough of that has happened, people start having nostalgia for that era and want machines, but they're a little difficult to shake loose and prices start rising. The older a piece or category of tech is, the smaller all the numbers are, in terms of quantity, so it'll be interesting to say how this plays out long-term when we get to the point of, IDK, Mac OS X 10.6 on 2009-2011 Macs being legitimately "vintage" - especially because this was by the time of MacBooks being among the single most popular laptop models in existence. The problem there with finding "good" examples of MacBook/Airs in 2030 is going to be that most of the people who bought and used them used them hard for a very long time. (Though, to their credit, since sometime in the mid-late 2000s the build quality overall on Mac laptops took a huge leap forward from where it was for the '90s and early 2000s, due in part to material changes and in part to Apple just getting better at it. (And, the much much greater popularity means that unless the number of people engaging in vintage computing as a hobby scales, even with greater failure rates and more difficult to recover from failure modes. (Especially dependent on what happens when the first person decides to just pull the battery out of a newer MacBook Pro and run it that way, and how that'll end compared to doing it on one of the older MacBook Pros.) TL;DR - if we're noticing a raise in powerpc mac prices, I'm not surprised.
  5. Just wanted to say "Thank you" for addressing my issue/concern. I'll try to get that disk up. I need to check the Shareware agreement, and make sure that form of distribution is allowed. And if the author is still around, maybe I can actually send in the shareware fee -- if I get to a point where I can play the game.
  6. MacFox

    Recent spike in PPC Mac prices?

    I've noticed this too. I like PPC Macs. I got most of the ones I want, but I'm always tempted to add more. The rising prices make me think twice before expanding my collection though. I got my 500mhz iceBook for around $60 shipped from eBay about 4 years ago. It's a nice machine.
  7. Today
  8. LaPorta

    Help with Classic II

    Yes I wasn’t sure that versus Something I inadvertently did. I think the cap goo did it in more than anything else. I can only hope my repairs aren’t too ghetto...
  9. eaten trace somewhere ? A picture of the logic board ?
  10. bibilit

    Help with Classic II

    eaten trace, common issue as well.
  11. EvilCapitalist

    Recent spike in PPC Mac prices?

    iBook clamshells seem to be more pricey than iceBooks partially because of the supposed unreliability of the iceBooks and partially because they're distinctive looking machines that were all over the place in the 99~01ish timeframe in pop culture. It also helps to drive up prices when you have a single individual turning loads of them into "art" projects. As for the iceBooks, any that were going to die from the GPU/motherboard problems they had would have died off ages ago so the ones that are left now are, in my opinion, as reliable as any other period machine. That bad rep does help keep prices low. You can pick up a decent working machine for under $50. All of this is just conjecture though, it could be that several people decided that now was the time to buy PPC Macs and drove up prices at the specific time you were also looking.
  12. NJRoadfan

    Recent spike in PPC Mac prices?

    Finding a TiBook in decent shape is rare. They weren't the most durable machines and showed wear very quickly. Almost every well used one (not a desk queen) will have worn out palm rests, chipped paint, and even a broken hinge. Being the most powerful OS 9 compatible portable adds to the value as well, although likely not as much as it used to.
  13. Crutch

    SCSI2SD and spindown

    Yes thanks! I got it working following hte approach finkmac outlined above, with some help from codesrc who made the requisite “nodelay” bootloader available again for the purpose. Works perfectly now. I had never realized the PB 500s have no fan, all you hear is the HD noise, so they run completely silent with a SCSI2SD installed. Having never opened one up until recently, I always just assumed there was a tiny fan in there ....
  14. Possibly bad memory. Have you tried a memory test program?
  15. IlikeTech

    Beige G3 Strange Issues

    Thanks for the advice but that machine is long gone at this point, as it was a totally rusty mess
  16. AlpineRaven

    Performa 450 dead

    Switch on the PSU and test for power on the power plug - I bet you money the PSU is dead/needs recap. Cheers AP
  17. bibilit

    Performa 450 dead

    Probably a bad PSU (pretty common) you can have a look at outputs with a multimeter. Capacitors should be replaced as a matter of fact on both the PSU and Logic Board.
  18. Byrd

    Recent spike in PPC Mac prices?

    G3, G4 and G5 towers remain pretty cheap, partly because they’re too expensive to ship and prone to damage. Local pickup should net you a decent machine for little coin if you keep at searching for a few weeks. PowerBooks have always held more value, partly due to their timeless design and size. iBooks are cheap!
  19. james_w

    2x BeBoxes!

    It was my impression that they never got Be OS working on G3, but I could be wrong! I have it on a Umax 604e-based clone too (a Super Pulsar)
  20. james_w

    2x BeBoxes!

    Yeah, not sure. I hear there's a hack to use them as VU metres for the sound output... but I've not found it yet
  21. toples50

    Performa 450 dead

    I have a Performa 450 but seems completely dead.I have added a working battery but nothing.Does not start up or any sound from power supply... what can I do?
  22. JDW

    PowerBook 520c keyboard

    I'd like to see a photo of yours if different from the one below...
  23. Cory5412

    WGS6150 - what did it have?

    I can't speak authoritatively on this, because I haven't looked at restore CDs from the era yet, but the AWGS machines were mostly marketed to particular potential with add-on software you could get, both from Apple and from third parties, and less to (as in the later years in the G3/G4/OSX-Server era when Apple definitely bundled AppleShare IP and later OS X Server) the built-in capabilities, of, for example, AppleShare/IP. With that in mind the impression I've always gotten from 6150/8150/9150 materials is that the three were segmented based on intended use cases as well as workgroup/user base sizes. i.e. the 6150 might "prototypically" have served a single team of 20 or fewer people with a couple hundred megs of shared data and one or two printers, or run, alongside other machines or bigger ones, a single application or task (groupware like email/firstclass or a calendar application, or host a ClarisWorks database as part of a line of business apps.) For example, see: 1993 Magazine ad: http://www.vectronicscollections.org/gallery/ads/macintosh/0139.php 1993 Internet Server ad (featuring an AWGS60) http://www.vectronicscollections.org/gallery/ads/macintosh/0158.php 1993 AWGS95 http://www.vectronicscollections.org/gallery/ads/macintosh/0165.php (I know this is a different scenario b/w A/UX but womewhere there's an AWGS 95 configuration document that talks about buying it with/without A/UX, and with/without licensing to different service components.) 1993 68k-based AWGS brochure http://www.vectronicscollections.org/gallery/ads/macintosh/0230.php - talks about different models, gives examples of why you might want a "server" in the first place. Also, gives a list of example applications you might run on a server. There's a fair number of different appliancey things that you might expect to run together on the same box and/or in virtual machines today that probably wouldn't have in the '90s for speed and reliability reasons. 1994 68k/PPC-based AWGS brochure http://www.vectronicscollections.org/gallery/ads/macintosh/0232.php - similar, updated for PPC. Honorable mention, here, to PowerShare, which existed for all of like three years as a high end powerTalk coordination and relay service for messaging and for powertalk file and coordination/directory stuff. A 9150 or 8150 would've made a pretty swole enterprise-wide PowerTalk directory server while a 6150 might have been a good departmental/team filebox or suited to a single task like bridging powertalk and internet-based email systems. 1994 AWGS magazine ad (1) http://www.vectronicscollections.org/gallery/ads/macintosh/0140.php 1994 AWGS magazine ad (2) http://www.vectronicscollections.org/gallery/ads/macintosh/0141.php - pretty generic, describes headaches of the time to be solved by having a server. 1997 AWGS article http://www.vectronicscollections.org/gallery/ads/macintosh/0275.php - talks about why you might need/want a server. 7250/7350/9650. The 1997 brochure is really explicit about there being different software bundles for different ways you might have used a server, so you might, in 1997, have bought a 7250 to run a web site, another 7250 to run email, and a 9650 to stuff hard disks in to do local file service, and a 7350 to do a particular workflow task, for example. Annoyingly, to the point of the original question, the 1994 68k/PPC AWGS brochure, which is the one that mentions the 6150, doesn't actually list specific server bundles, but Apple went hard on Mac servers running both their own and third party utilities for most of the '90s so it basically tracks that there was an appleshare 4 + powershare version, a version that was pretty much blank (just like a stock pmac6100/ would've been) and a version that, say, included some internet-focused software. (Especially since AppleShare IP 5 in like 1997 was the first version of AppleShare to bundle Internet-based services like web and email, For as bad as Apple's model proliferation problem was in the '90s, I've long felt they would've been well served, perhaps using clone builder techniques or even literally clone builder motherboards, by building some systems a little more tunes, physically, to service needs. A box with room for a couple more hard disks without being "the 9650/233" or, IDK, something with more serial ports (even as an add-in card) for peripheral/printer sharing and/or faster localtalk routing/bridging, for example, would be a neat thing to have seen. (I would build this as a variation of the 4400 or something along the lines of the PowerComputing PowerBase or UMAX C600, but in a bigger case, perhaps even do an IDE boot disk and room for Floppy, CD-ROM, [5.25-inch removable device] and then three 3.5-inch disk bays, bundle a software raid tool that can build a raid 5 stripe. Given the not-particularly-wide proliferation of AWGSes, I imagine that it would've made negative sense to build that as a product. When Apple did build (often, pretty good) purpose-built hardware (ANS, XServe) I feel like they aimed it at the wrong market. The XServe should ahve been a 4u or 5u server with 8 or so 3.5-inch hard disk bays on the front, that you can run as a minitower in a closet, behind a photocopier or under a desk, and the ANS should have been an AppleShare IP box for only a little more than the 9650 cost with a focus on some more configurability and the disk bays in particular. (There was an ANS300 that was also rack-mountable that got as far as a prototype state, overall specs-wise I think it was comparable to a 7300 or 8500, but I forgot what its storage arrangements were.) .... Anyway.
  24. I have a FileWare disk whose data I'd like to verify (and duplicate if the data's valid). Any help would be appreciated.
  25. pb3623

    PowerBook 520c keyboard

    Thanks, @JDW - I knew you would be able to weigh in I asked about 一 because my 145B keyboard has it screened onto the 1 key - but I understand sensibilities change over time and someone obviously decided, as you say, that the JIS layout was just too cluttered. As to why? Well, the 550c was only sold in Japan so it makes sense to have a JIS keyboard... so if I can't find the original 550c model in black, the next best thing is to steal a gray one from a 520c. Thanks for the great Macworld story!
  26. Hi, I just fixed one Lisa 2/5 that had screen jumping vertically. The jumping became worse as the machine warmed up. Main culprits were three electrolytic capacitors on the analog board that have leaked and corroded the surrounding areas. These are three 16V 10uF capacitors that were purple in my case and of a unknown manufacturer. When desoldering there was a similar smell as when recapping later Macs (for instance SE/30, etc.). I used 25V 10uF caps, and I also cleaned most of the green corrosion around them. I have also replaced all the potentiometers as the original owner wanted to do this at first, but this didn't make any difference at all. I left all the other capacitors there as they were not leaking at all and had good ESR. Just my 2 cents, perhaps might come in handy to someone :)
  27. Yesterday
  28. Charadis

    SCSI2SD and spindown

    I haven't logged in here for a while, but I see you're trying to get a SCSI2SD working in a 550c. Hope you were able to resolve any issues. And thanks for your purchase! I did get it working previously on a PB 520, there was a program that was provided to format the SD card and image the drive partition I think. I did very little testing and very little even with that module, given the image was a very small partition out of the 4GB SD card I used (I think it was only 512MB?).
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