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Seeking beta testers for Mac Sync-inator VGA sync converter

bigmessowires

Well-known member
Yeah, there isn't a lot of extra space when plugging in to some of my slotted Macs either. I'm not sure what can be done about that, though. A DB-15 connector is a particular size, and a PCB that's mounted under a right-angle DB-15 is a particular thickness (to within a few tenths of a millimeter), and neither of those dimensions can be changed. The overall length and width of the Sync-inator are dimensions that I can control, but the height (or thickness) isn't. I'd thought about maybe having a case that leaves part of the PCB exposed for clearance reasons.
 

CC_333

Well-known member
I like @mg.man 's idea, as it's probably more or less in line with what was done with many of the older adapters, as I'm sure they had the same problem?

c
 

LaPorta

Well-known member
Another good test, and actually a very helpful one: I used this to connect the same Dell 1907 FPt to my kid's custom Quadra 630 I made for them. Previous converters I used would always produce an interference pattern...this one does not! I used the setting of a multisync 16" monitor, and "7" mode (route csync to hsync, creating new vsync). Works perfectly!
 

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Johnlh

New member
I have a Mac IIsi with a VGA and a variety of other monitors. I would like to beta test your video converter.
 

theirongiant

Active member
Hello @bigmessowires, I'm sure you have enough beta testers right now, but I just saw that photo shared by @LaPorta , and that physical design with such a long case is going to result in an extreme amount of stress placed on the PCB or the component if your Sync-inator is used in a typical horizontal position, especially with a heavy video cable plugged into it.

I have a BlueSCSI, and I didn't dare use it sticking straight out of the back, so I bought a 90º angle adapter for safety. It points the BlueSCSI upright and keeps it out of the way so that if I am working behind the computer, I don't accidentally bump it and damage the connector.

You really should consider making the Syncinator into a dongle with a short extension cable if possible, otherwise you're gonna end up with a non-zero number of unhappy customers with snapped off ends.

PS: I have the FloppyEmu and it's wonderful for the Classic II sitting on my table next to the LC III. I bought the complete assembled unit with the clear case for the main unit. For external use with Apple II and older Macs, I only wish that you'd designed a small protective head shell for the 19-pin external connector, instead of leaving the adapter board exposed.
 
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olePigeon

Well-known member
@bigmessowires Not to overwhelm you or whatever with my stupid questions, but I was just wondering: what about a TTL to HDMI adapter? I know they already exist in some form or another (RGB2HDMI?), so I don't know if it'd be reinventing the wheel. But a Mac specific adapter with all the timings already set up as a plug & play adapter would be great. Would make LCD mods on toaster Macs really simple.

Think of all the silly upgrades you could fandangle into an SE or SE/30 with all the room now available by not having a CRT.
 

bigmessowires

Well-known member
It's been a long time coming, but the Mac Sync-inator is officially launching today! See the announcement for more info. Thanks for everybody's suggestions and feedback through the long development process. If you've ever struggled with getting a VGA monitor to work with your classic Mac or Apple IIgs, please check out the Sync-inator.
 

theirongiant

Active member
ORDERED. Congratulations.

Now someone just needs to make a strong case or a short dongle for this thing, as folks are liable to snap it off or stress out the connectors from the weight of sagging VGA cables.
 

bigmessowires

Well-known member
ORDERED. Congratulations.

Now someone just needs to make a strong case or a short dongle for this thing, as folks are liable to snap it off or stress out the connectors from the weight of sagging VGA cables.
Thanks, I spent a good while considering this during design, but finally decided it really isn't an issue. I used it extensively with both horizontal and vertical video ports. But you could use a short DB15 to DB15 cable as an extension if you're concerned. Maybe something like https://www.amazon.com/RIIEYOCA-Connecter-Straight-Communication-0-5M(Black)/dp/B09P1LFRB4
 

David Cook

Well-known member
It's been a long time coming, but the Mac Sync-inator is officially launching today! See the announcement for more info. Thanks for everybody's suggestions and feedback through the long development process. If you've ever struggled with getting a VGA monitor to work with your classic Mac or Apple IIgs, please check out the Sync-inator.

Ordered!
 

jmacz

Well-known member
Congrats! Really cool watching you run into a problem and then building a product to solve it! :)
 

David Cook

Well-known member
I was testing a RasterOps 8/24XLi to determine why it is so slow. The video was washed out. Then, I remembered your video adapter. It worked perfectly and provides a beautiful quality image.

The only problem I encountered is that it doesn't quite fit in a Macintosh II-IIx-IIfx slot due to the length of the connector leads. A nippy cutter quickly corrects that.

Connector-leads-need-trimming.jpg
 

LaPorta

Well-known member
I was testing a RasterOps 8/24XLi to determine why it is so slow. The video was washed out. Then, I remembered your video adapter. It worked perfectly and provides a beautiful quality image.

The only problem I encountered is that it doesn't quite fit in a Macintosh II-IIx-IIfx slot due to the length of the connector leads. A nippy cutter quickly corrects that.

View attachment 74931
Indeed, I had the same issue with my IIfx, and I think in its current incarnation, the the best thing is to just get a male-female short cable.
 

jmacz

Well-known member
@David Cook were you testing with an LCD monitor?

I remember having a discussion about washed out colors with @bigmessowires. In my case it was because the sync signals were being sent on R, G, and B, by the video card causing the LCD to misinterpret the input range and rendering the colors at values higher than they should be resulting in the washed out image. In my case since the sync signal is being generated by the card, I remember @bigmessowires saying the sync-inator can't filter those out. I've worked around it by shorting a pin on the DAC (on the video card) to disable the generation of the sync signals on RGB.

But curious what your issue was and how the sync-inator resolves it.
 

David Cook

Well-known member
@David Cook were you testing with an LCD monitor?

I remember having a discussion about washed out colors with @bigmessowires. In my case it was because the sync signals were being sent on R, G, and B, by the video card causing the LCD to misinterpret the input range and rendering the colors at values higher than they should be resulting in the washed out image. In my case since the sync signal is being generated by the card, I remember @bigmessowires saying the sync-inator can't filter those out. I've worked around it by shorting a pin on the DAC (on the video card) to disable the generation of the sync signals on RGB.

But curious what your issue was and how the sync-inator resolves it.
Yes, my setup is:
RasterOps 8/24/XLi v1.41
Macintosh II
Dell 2007WFPb LCD
640x480, 256 colors
System 7.1
With or without RasterOps drivers v1.4

Simply switching to my old standard Liberty adapter with either H-sync and V-sync enabled on the dip switch, or with Composite enabled on the dip switch, causes the washed out colors to return. Disabling all three syncs on the dip switch works fine with the Liberty adapter. Although I was able to get nice video using a standard adapter, I often change machines (that I am repairing), so @bigmessowires auto-adapter makes my life easier.

My standard for 'washed out' is that disabled menu items and the menu item dividers (such in the Finder Special menu) are not visible with 256 colors. (B&W uses a pattern which is visible)

Good video.jpgWashed-out video.jpg
 

bigmessowires

Well-known member
I have seen that exact phenomenon where grayed out menu items are invisible, and as previously discussed I'm pretty sure it's due to the presence of sync-on-green.
 
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