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Help getting MacTCP setup

cbmeeks

Well-known member
The Mac IIsi I have came with a network card.

What I'm trying to do is get it to either work with my DHCP router, or at least let me configure the network address.

The only reference I can find is this page:

Unfortunately, when I follow those instructions, I get an address of 192.168.123.3.

My network range needs to be in the 192.168.1.x range. I'd like to set it to 192.168.1.73 if I could.

But I have no clue as to what number I put in the "Net" field. I've Googled until my eyes bleed but I just can't seem to find it (I'm not a network guy).

Any tips on this?

Thanks!


EDIT:

Well crap. I think I found it.
Net: 12625921
Node: 73

Not sure if that's the "RIGHT" way to do it. Can't seem to ping it or anything. Ugh.
 
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cheesestraws

Well-known member
That looks like the right net/node pair to me. Make sure you're set to class C (the joys of ancient IP addressing UIs, yay).

The IP stack is loaded on-demand, so you won't see it participating in anything IP-related until something actually opens the driver and starts using it; try a simple FTP program or GetDown Pro or something.
 

MindWalker

Well-known member
If you can get files over to the IIsi, you might want to try the unofficial 2.1 patch which "that provides many improvements and a simpler user interface". The UI on the basic MacTCP is... not easy to figure out. It's on Macintosh Garden's MacTCP page. Also MacTCP Ping utility for troubleshooting.

OR if your machine has enough RAM, I'd recommend OpenTransport over MacTCP. I had all sort of networking issues on my IIcx with MacTCP and they all went away when I replaced it with OT. Also much easier to set up!
 

aperezbios

Well-known member
If you can get files over to the IIsi, you might want to try the unofficial 2.1 patch which "that provides many improvements and a simpler user interface". The UI on the basic MacTCP is... not easy to figure out. It's on Macintosh Garden's MacTCP page. Also MacTCP Ping utility for troubleshooting.

OR if your machine has enough RAM, I'd recommend OpenTransport over MacTCP. I had all sort of networking issues on my IIcx with MacTCP and they all went away when I replaced it with OT. Also much easier to set up!
@cbmeeks, OpenTransport only requires five megabytes of RAM to install. Given that the IIsi can, officially, take 16MB of RAM in SIMM form (for a total of 17MB), or, unofficially, up to 65 megabytes, I'd strongly encourage you to add RAM if you have the ability to do so for a reasonable price.
  • For 17 MB, install four 4 MB SIMMs.
  • For 33 MB, install four 8 MB SIMMs.
  • For 65 MB, install four 16 MB SIMMs.
 

warmech

Well-known member
OR if your machine has enough RAM, I'd recommend OpenTransport over MacTCP. I had all sort of networking issues on my IIcx with MacTCP and they all went away when I replaced it with OT. Also much easier to set up!
Just chiming in with my two cents - I spent way too long trying to get MacTCP to work on my SE/30 (like, a few hours) before finally giving up and installing OpenTransport. Within a few minutes I was able to ping my SE/30. If you can afford (in terms of RAM) to run OT, run OT; it is so, so much easier to work with than MacTCP.
 

olePigeon

Well-known member
@cbmeeks MacTCP doesn't actually do DHCP, it's actually BootP or RARP. So it's unlikely to work with your modern router. You need to set your MacTCP to manual. Below are the settings I use on my Macintosh IIci. I'm using version 2.0.6 which doesn't bother with Net and Node settings. It appears to work. I also have an older 10/100 Netgear switch between my vintage equipment and my modern equipment.

Just swap out the DNS for yours and make sure to put in an available IP address.
 

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cheesestraws

Well-known member
DHCP is an extension of BOOTP: some DHCP servers will do both, even if they don't claim they will. Mine has a little box I can check to get it to respond to BOOTP requests as well, which is handy.
 

mikes-macs

Well-known member
Plenty of modern cable modem/routers don't like Classic Mac Networking. (That is, using MacTCP and Network Control Panel...) It really depends on the router and the network card inside the Mac. So the idea of a 10/100 switch between the modem/router works, as it can negotiate with the router and the Mac.
On the other hand OpenTransport 1.1.2 is generally more compatible. With enough RAM a IIsi runs beautiful like this.
I had luck using a Nubus Shiva Network Card in my Mac IIsi.

If you really want to try Classic Networking then use MacTCP 2.1. Enter the IP manually. Following the instructions above, and I've had luck using my router's IP as DNS server IP as posted above with a . in the Domain field.

I use Apple's Internet Router and Apple's IP Gateway Software to provide MacIP to LocalTalk Macs via PhoneNet. One of the caveats of the Internet Router Software is that is will not work with OpenTransport. I had to figure out Classic Mac Networking. I got plenty of help here and http://www.applefool.com
 
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