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cubism

bluekatt

Well-known member
i stumbeld about a cube (not mine btw )

who had an interesting problem its dvd player was set to region 1 and sertting it to region 2 was easy enough except it needed to reboot

it reboots goes to open firmware and then you manually have to typ ein mac-boot where it greets you with a log in screen ..lovley

nobody knows the pass word and the open firmware prompt makes it a tad difficult to boot of a cd turning the cube in to a pretty presse paper

i have thrown pretty much every command at openfirmware to either get it to stop automatically booting and to get it to boot off a cd

to no avail

the hell is this ?

and short of ripping out the hd and installing os x on a differnt mac what can i do to get rid of open firmware booting ?

 

paws

Well-known member
err... isn't there an of command to boot from cd? something like... boot-cd? I know I've done it.

 

SiliconValleyPirate

Well-known member
i stumbeld about a cube (not mine btw )who had an interesting problem its dvd player was set to region 1 and sertting it to region 2 was easy enough except it needed to reboot

it reboots goes to open firmware and then you manually have to typ ein mac-boot where it greets you with a log in screen ..lovley

nobody knows the pass word and the open firmware prompt makes it a tad difficult to boot of a cd turning the cube in to a pretty presse paper

i have thrown pretty much every command at openfirmware to either get it to stop automatically booting and to get it to boot off a cd

to no avail

the hell is this ?

and short of ripping out the hd and installing os x on a differnt mac what can i do to get rid of open firmware booting ?
I found this with no less than 1 search on Google :p

Bypassing Open Firmware Security

If you forget the Open Firmware password for a computer, or if someone else sets one before you do, you can reset the Open Firmware settings to their defaults (no password and the none security mode). If other Open Firmware settings have been changed, this might reset them as well. As I said, it's a cumbersome process, so you'll want to avoid having to do it.

First, open the computer and either remove or install RAM. What you need to do is change the amount of RAM that's installed in the computer, so simply moving modules around won't do the trick. Reboot the computer with the changed amount of RAM and zap the PRAM. (Changing the installed RAM allows you to use the command-option-P-R key combination to zap the PRAM, regardless of the Open Firmware security mode, which removes the password.) Then boot into the Open Firmware prompt and use the set-defaults command. This should reset all Open Firmware configurations to the default settings. Use the reset-all command to reboot with the new settings, after which you can set a new password and security mode (either directly through the Open Firmware prompt or using another tool). Restore the original amount of RAM in the computer.

 

Quadraman

Well-known member
i stumbeld about a cube (not mine btw )who had an interesting problem its dvd player was set to region 1 and sertting it to region 2 was easy enough except it needed to reboot

it reboots goes to open firmware and then you manually have to typ ein mac-boot where it greets you with a log in screen ..lovley

nobody knows the pass word and the open firmware prompt makes it a tad difficult to boot of a cd turning the cube in to a pretty presse paper

i have thrown pretty much every command at openfirmware to either get it to stop automatically booting and to get it to boot off a cd

to no avail

the hell is this ?

and short of ripping out the hd and installing os x on a differnt mac what can i do to get rid of open firmware booting ?
I found this with no less than 1 search on Google :p

Bypassing Open Firmware Security

If you forget the Open Firmware password for a computer, or if someone else sets one before you do, you can reset the Open Firmware settings to their defaults (no password and the none security mode). If other Open Firmware settings have been changed, this might reset them as well. As I said, it's a cumbersome process, so you'll want to avoid having to do it.

First, open the computer and either remove or install RAM. What you need to do is change the amount of RAM that's installed in the computer, so simply moving modules around won't do the trick. Reboot the computer with the changed amount of RAM and zap the PRAM. (Changing the installed RAM allows you to use the command-option-P-R key combination to zap the PRAM, regardless of the Open Firmware security mode, which removes the password.) Then boot into the Open Firmware prompt and use the set-defaults command. This should reset all Open Firmware configurations to the default settings. Use the reset-all command to reboot with the new settings, after which you can set a new password and security mode (either directly through the Open Firmware prompt or using another tool). Restore the original amount of RAM in the computer.
Great post. I have an iMac that the original owner set a password on that she forgot so she reset her own user account password to something easy to remember before she gave it to me. I can use it fine under her user account, but it just bugs me that I don't know the master password.

 
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