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Ya Know What *Woulda* Been Cool ....?


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... if the Macintosh 512K computer came with an AM/FM/SW radio built in.

A coax jack on the back -- near the powerswitch -- for you to plug the included, rubbertipped telescope antenna into.

Then hit APPLE > RADIO & a fullscreen display with the frequency in the ultrabeautiful Chicago font comes up and you tune by

clicking the onscreen left/right arrows or the left/right cursorkeys.

You can, of course, add & delete preset stations plus the added shortwave bonus -- conspiracy radio from Texas, anyone?

 

It's a multithousand dollar computer.

What'd be the big deal of another $10 -- if that much -- by adding a radiotuner inside?

 

 

:b&w:

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I assume that a feature like that would not have been consistent with Apple's desired image for the Macintosh. If you look at all their old ads, they touted it as a revolutionary computer for most business and personal needs, and obviously wanted to distance it from ubiquitous toys and trinkets. But I agree that would be awesome, especially if there was a set of decent stereo speakers inside - probably would have been a good idea for the Color Classic or LC5xx series.

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I assume that a feature like that would not have been consistent with Apple's desired image for the Macintosh. If you look at all their old ads, they touted it as a revolutionary computer for most business and personal needs, and obviously wanted to distance it from ubiquitous toys and trinkets.

 

Close, but no cigar! Look at the pathetic MacTV. ;)

 

As to the notion of using the 512k, You'd undoubtedlyly have LOTS of RFI problems to iron out, like damping emissions picked up from the MoBo, telegraphed thru the chassis and exiting the case via the whip antenna you've spec'd! No way such a rig could get a home rating from the FCC considering the internal structure of the FatMac.

 

This is just a W.A.G. but I'd put money on the fact that it required a modularized design with INTERNAL RFI shielding in a mostly plastic chassis/shell to get the MacTV past the FCC roadblock for home use.

 

Sorry to be a killjoy . . . :I

 

jt =8-/

 

p.s. . . . but it IS a nifty concept! ;)

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I had absolutely ZERO idea that the FCC wouldn't allow a Macintosh computer with a radio built in

 

It isn't a matter of the FCC allowing it or otherwise. It is a matter of Apple designing it to reflect FCC regulations. FCC regulations are there to prevent interference with services in the EM spectrum. This interference could cause problems with everything from emergency communications for fire and police (unlikely in this case) to your neighbours radio or TV.

 

This is why it is a bad idea to remove things like RF shielding and RF chokes from your equipment, even if it does make it look cooler.

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I assume that a feature like that would not have been consistent with Apple's desired image for the Macintosh. If you look at all their old ads, they touted it as a revolutionary computer for most business and personal needs, and obviously wanted to distance it from ubiquitous toys and trinkets.

 

Close, but no cigar! Look at the pathetic MacTV. ;)

 

)

 

Good point - I was only precise by mentioning that Apple was ready to incorporate such a feature into the Macintosh line by the time of the LC5xx series - the MacTV you mention is simply a modified LC5xx! I was referring to the original post, which was speaking about a Mac 512k, a much different time in Macintosh history than the MacTV.

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Computers back then were designed for office use and not home use correct (TV interference wasn't a major concern).

 

Not true, most MICRO-Computers were designed for the difficult to achieve "Class A" or suitable for home use designation.

 

Monsters like Mainframes never needed to worry about the FCC because the ones that weren't built to survive a nuclear war were installed in purpose-built rooms or even sections of Industrial/Office space and the bomb shelter/room/building itself WAS the RFI as well as EMP shielding in some cases. (pun unintended, but left in just for the h%#1 of it!)

 

Only when MINI-Computers became more common the line blurred somewhat and RFI/FCC issues became more commonplace.

 

When the MicroComputer became ubiquitous, much to IBM's chagrin, BTW, A "Class A" rating became a MUST for any successful/marketable computer, even in many business settings.

 

IIRC, of course. ;)

 

jt :b&w:

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