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9 IIci's and an LC that were left outside in the rain.


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The school was always glad to give away their old stuff to someone who would appreciate it.

 

Lucky.

 

When my elementary school was getting rid of their Macs (LC575s, 5400s, 9500s) back in 2004 for some crappy PC's that were even slower than the Macs, I asked about buying one (I was even willing to pay), and they said "We have a deal with a recycler."

 

Heaven forbid they could let ONE computer go. :-/::)

 

It's unusual for a school district around here to take the stuff directly to a recycler. Most districts try to auction the machines off.

If that's how things worked around here, then no doubt, I'd be a happier person. :)

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Ah, this story reminds me of a guy I met at a used-equipment fair who wanted to sell me a Macintosh IIcx and an Apple CD-ROM 300 for the rough equivalent of 250 dollars. They didn't look good and on closer inspection they were both suspiciously stinky. When I opened the IIcx the rust inside was so bad as to make it hard for me to remove the cover!

 

The bastard probably had taken both the Mac and the CD-ROM reader from the street after god knows how many days of rain and bad weather, cleaned them outside, and wanted to scam some poor ignorant tourist.

 

"You should be ashamed", I told him. At least he had a sheepy face and did not utter a word.

 

Cheers

Rick

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Schools in the UK seem to be funny about letting people have their old equipment, mainly from the liability sake. If someone buys or takes an old computer from them and it sets fire to their house, it is likely that person would claim against the school and win everything. It is an unfortunate attitude that seems to have crept into meany aspects of British society.

 

However, that is just from an official standpoint. It is unlikely you will find a school or college openly selling off old equipment but often by asking the right people it is possible to do a deal. Some places also have technicians who check equipment for electrical safety before selling / giving away, which also helps deal with the liability issues.

 

For a country where the government bangs on about recycling I think more should be done in the UK to distribute and re-use old computers. Currently the vast majority go to recyclers who strip them for parts and precious metals, or they just go into landfill.

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Schools in the UK seem to be funny about letting people have their old equipment, mainly from the liability sake.

 

All public bodies are fussy about giving away kit to staff and students, and quite rightly. It is far too easy for a "piece of junk" (ie last year's PC) to be given away by an unscrupulous employee. Requiring that surplus is sold at auction or to a scrapper keeps people honest.

 

"Health and safety" is a UK myth, used by some as a defence for unpopular decisions and by others to attack public servants. Both attitudes should be treated with contempt.

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Giving the less fortunate anything older then 7 years old is a waste of time... Anything 10 year old or older are just for hobbyists and collectors.

 

Requiring that surplus is sold at auction or to a scrapper keeps people honest.

 

We all know which models have better longevity, and concerns about hardware failure are minimal to me. I'm only distributing 3/4 of the inventory at any given time to allow for easy swaps when such situations do arise.

 

Why does a 10 year old computer need to be something for hobbyists and collectors only? With service issues aside, why is a computer from 1997 (in use purely for educational/personal productivity tasks, running contemporary applications) any less useful in that role that it was a decade ago? They are indeed "too slow, have low ram, and have an obsolete OS" for anything produced after their time or release, but those applications were excellent. I might even argue that these older machines are better suited for the task given the simplicity of the interface (AtEase or otherwise) and the clarity of the software. Frankly, I'm glad that the younger recipients aren't able to hop on the internet without supervision.

 

I understand the rationale for how surplus school computer equipment is treated. It's based on the need for responsible handling of public assets; but what I'm saying is there are shortcomings in this process that mean more to the community.

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We all know which models have better longevity, and concerns about hardware failure are minimal to me. I'm only distributing 3/4 of the inventory at any given time to allow for easy swaps when such situations do arise.

 

Why does a 10 year old computer need to be something for hobbyists and collectors only? With service issues aside, why is a computer from 1997 (in use purely for educational/personal productivity tasks, running contemporary applications) any less useful in that role that it was a decade ago? They are indeed "too slow, have low ram, and have an obsolete OS" for anything produced after their time or release, but those applications were excellent. I might even argue that these older machines are better suited for the task given the simplicity of the interface (AtEase or otherwise) and the clarity of the software. Frankly, I'm glad that the younger recipients aren't able to hop on the internet without supervision.

 

I understand the rationale for how surplus school computer equipment is treated. It's based on the need for responsible handling of public assets; but what I'm saying is there are shortcomings in this process that mean more to the community.

 

Because machines are thrown away these days around 4 years after then are purchased. It is like arguing why should I throw away 10 day old bread thats only slightly moldy and dried out to a hungry guy who has a supply of 2 day old bread for free.

 

On an individual basis you can probably find somebody that would want a 10 year old Pentium, but for most organizations they would rather deal with 4 year old Dells that all can run XP and have a legit XP sticker/serial. If something does break people would rather be able to get spare parts from anywhere and not having to use ebay to hunt for obsolete stuff.

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Various schools and other entities HAVE become MUCH stricter about giving stuff away. At least in MA, where I live, tax reasons actually have a lot to do with it. Schools and other governmental entities are exempt from sales tax. Private individuals, of course, have to pay. Thus transferring stuff that was bought by the state to individuals, even when that stuff as been written off as no longer having value, is seen as illegal under the strict interpretation of tax law used by the University of Massachusetts system. Thus the stuff can't be given away and usually can't even be sold, so (for the University of Massachusetts), it just goes to a secure warehouse at the "main" campus, where it just sits for all of eternity. What I wouldn't give for a day in that warehouse...

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Various schools and other entities HAVE become MUCH stricter about giving stuff away. At least in MA, where I live, tax reasons actually have a lot to do with it. Schools and other governmental entities are exempt from sales tax. Private individuals, of course, have to pay. Thus transferring stuff that was bought by the state to individuals, even when that stuff as been written off as no longer having value, is seen as illegal under the strict interpretation of tax law used by the University of Massachusetts system. Thus the stuff can't be given away and usually can't even be sold, so (for the University of Massachusetts), it just goes to a secure warehouse at the "main" campus, where it just sits for all of eternity. What I wouldn't give for a day in that warehouse...

They can recycle it, probably after getting enough volume to fill up a recycling truck.

 

My old university pretty much uses the stuff untill it cannot be repaired anymore and then sends it to the local prison to be dismantled and then sent off for recycling.

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