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Best way to clean the mechanics of a 128K drive


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Hi,

 

My 128K have some problems with its floppy drive. I removed when I received it a few month ago and clean the mechanical parts with WD40, because they were just stucked together. Impossible to insert a disk or remove it from the drive.

 

It worked fine for a while, but the problem is back now.

 

Any suggestion as to the best way to clean the mechanics and lubricate it?

 

Thanks

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I use acetone. For a difficult one you may need to actually remove the eject mechanism entirely and soak it. Then I lubricate with WD-40.

 

The first time I did it I had problems because I didn't get to everywhere that was gummed up, so my main advice is clean lots, then some more, then some more... :-)

 

Ken

 

p.s. these drives are usually known as 400K drives rather than 128K drives

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I use acetone. For a difficult one you may need to actually remove the eject mechanism entirely and soak it. Then I lubricate with WD-40.

 

The first time I did it I had problems because I didn't get to everywhere that was gummed up, so my main advice is clean lots, then some more, then some more... :-)

 

Ken

 

p.s. these drives are usually known as 400K drives rather than 128K drives

 

I may try this. A little bit as I did for the hinge repair of my eMates.

 

Actually, I know they are 400K drive. I wanted to say, the drive in my 128K mac. I just said it the wrong way!

 

Thanks

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Did you use any lube after you cleaned the drive with WD40? Or did you expect WD40 to be the lubricant? To rely solely on WD40 for long-term lubrication is to expect too much. It's fine for cleaning off the old gunk, but then you have to re-lube the drive with fresh grease (and preferably after cleaning off as much of the WD40 as you can get to).

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Beware of WD40 and 400k drive mechanisms - I seem to recall that the optical sensors for the drive arm don't take kindly to WD40 (or anything else) being sprayed on them.

 

I have several drives with dead optical sensors (ie drive keeps ramming the arm mechanism at full extension).

 

Happy for someone to mention a fix to this BTW.

 

Regards,

 

Macdownunder

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I did wonder, but as the recommendation in Larry Pina's book was to lubricate with WD-40, I left it at that.

 

How would something like Dry Glide go?

 

I agree that WD40 is not a good lubricator. It is more a cleaner. First time I used white lithium grease after I clean it up. Did not remember that until now.

 

To help cleaning, this time, I dismantle the moving arts from the drive, then put them into paint thinner for the night. That's how I did it for my eMate hinge repair. Very efficient.

 

I will use WD40 again today to finish cleaning the moving parts. Then I may apply Gigaloo, its a good cleaner too, but most of all, it is a good lubricator, and more liquid than the lithium grease I used. Maybe the grease was too much and makes the drive parts stick again.

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A common mistake is to get a little overzealous with the grease. Lithium grease works just fine, but use it sparingly. And clean off the WD40 first.

 

I'll give a try to the Gigaloo for now. It is more liquid, so easier to spread where needed.

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I take the drives apart as far as I can go, then wipe off any old grease. It's just not a good idea to be spraying ANYTHING around a floppy drive. After that, I wash all the parts in very hot water.. just rinse them.. no soap.. taking care not to get water into motors / steppers.

 

Let dry 24 hours.

 

Then I reassemble using a synthetic phono lube.. VERY sparingly.. on any parts that were originally lubed. WD-40 is NOT a long term lube.. and is way too lightweight to serve anything more than a "loosening bolts" or cleaning purpose.

 

Synthetic is necessary so the lube doesn't dry up down the road.

 

These methods have resulted in many perfectly working floppy drives.

 

~ J

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