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Homemade Mini Case for LC, P475, Q605

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It would be a neat little micro Q700 type of thing.

 

Definitely neat. That's one of the form factors I've been looking at for the 630/6400 version, but I'm waiting for Floofies to get everything on the MicroATX PSU front nailed down and documented before jumping in  .  .  .  maybe.

 

Corrogated Missle Command parts are done and awaiting the hot glue gun. [:D]]'>

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Looks to me like you're good to go!

 

post-902-0-13857600-1499533311_thumb.jpg

 

post-902-0-53458600-1499533321_thumb.jpg

 

Just for mj:

 

post-902-0-96583200-1499533334_thumb.jpg

 

Adding the roof and ridge vent makes it taller, but fits a retro-gaming front bezel graphic nicely.

May also induce a bit of Bernoulli/Venturi/Whatever convection enhancement.

 

Tower's got some nice heft to it and the Feets make it very solid. Thinning it to the widthe of the height of the PSU as shown in pic 2 and adding stabilization fins ought to make it rock solid!

 

 

 

edit:  just realized it's possible to work the slots/tabs into the pixel pattern for a bit of camouflage or just have  the graphic printed on vinyl co cover them. Disk access indicator LED at apex or pattern for rocket exhaust?

Edited by Trash80toHP_Mini

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Nice! Your cardboard version looks good. I hope the acrylic model works as well, once I get the parts cut.

 

Thanks!  [:)]]'>  It should look good, it's cut from your plans! [;)]]'>  I did have a little trouble getting the PSU into battery, but it got there. Shouldn't be a problem putting the acrylic version together, my corrugated is a bit thick by comparison and it was all hot glued together before the installation. Your case will be flexible until you slip that end cap on.

                                                            

Modded the (lunchtime rush job) PDF and printed out the <MJMCMT< at work for playtime on my day off tomorrow. Maybe I'll haul the bandsaw out of the kitchen pantry for some real plexi playtime!

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You all got me grinding gears now thinking about this Sawtooth G4 logic board I have.

 

Interesting notion. Thoughts of  a dedicated Q630/40 Patriot Command Arcade MiniTower have been haunting me. Used to play that every Wednesday Family Game Night on the Q630.

 

Evil Brick Company templates they are. 3D Front Bezel Simply Irresistible is it.

 

post-902-0-48730200-1499625951_thumb.jpg

 

 

In plastic blocks 3D rendering challenge LegoFU Master and Paduan Lerner for is it: MJMCMT-02.PDF

 

1/2 Scale template is it. [:D]]'>

 

 

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This looks really neat.

 

One thought here is that at stock 475 speeds, you probably don't need an awful lot of ventilation. As a young child, I was entertained by the idea of an LC475 re-housed into a cardboard box, so I pretty much literally dropped its board into the box some corn dogs came in (they had been wrapped in plastic, so there was no grease) cut holes for the ports and for the power supply, and let it go.

 

As with this design, I omitted a floppy diskette drive, and I used some LEGO to let the hard disk rest on top of the motherboard.

 

I don't think I left it running for more than a few hours at a time, but that would probably have been enough to cause problems, if it was going to.

 

Remember: the PowerBook 520/540 and 190 have the same or almost the same chips and those systems don't have any ventilation or fans.

 

All of that said, I don't think it would hurt much to have a fan in there smewhere. There was a small fan in the LC series design that brought in cool air from under the machine and pretty much spread it to the sides. A fan on top pulling air out the top should be sufficient. Also possible, a blower style fan (like the ones you see available as dedicated PCI cards) above the ports where your LCPDS and SCSI2SD aren't likely to be. Then, a few slats/louvres either on the front or perhaps on the top/bottom to pull air through.

 

But, I don't know if I would bother until it proves to be a problem, especially since/if you're not putting a conventional hard disk (or worse: a big/fast one) in there.

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To be honest, it probably doesn't matter. the 475 in particular appears not to have a heatsink at all. The whole point is that somehow, the extremely minimal amount of heat a computer like this makes has a way to escape.

 

From a durability and longevity standpoint, I don't think there's a problem here unless you put a temperature prob in and it's over about 90 degrees celsius.

 

It will be different (but not that much) if you manage to overclock a 40MHz to 45+ on a 475/605 board inside this case, but without doing that, I actually think vents on the top is probably enough to keep the system cool enough to be stable, long term.

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Wikipedia says:

Heat was always a problem throughout the 68040's life. While it delivered over four times the per-clock performance of the 68020 and 68030, the chip's complexity and power requirements came from a large die and large caches. This affected the scaling of the processor and it was never able to run with a clock rate exceeding 40 MHz. A 50 MHz variant was planned, but canceled. Overclocking enthusiasts reported success reaching 50 MHz using a 100 MHz oscillator instead of an 80 MHz part and the then novel technique of adding oversized heat sinks with fans.

 

But they only say it in the context of overclocking. At stock speeds, they obviously ran okay in confined spaces with little to no airflow.

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You're missing the point, outside the fanless Compacts with melted vent gratings over the A/B (I have one like that) Apple's case designs had fairly adequate airflow. The CPU is only a part of the system cooling budget, the PSU is a far bigger piece of that pie and it NEEDS to be cooled. That little fan on the floor of the LC is not a bad design choice at all, it does a lot more than you're giving it credit for, don't underestimate its importance.

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I managed to scrounge up a PDS ethernet card, so now I'll be able to check the fit of logic board + PDS card + SCSI2SD in the acrylic case. I also received a notice that the laser cutting is in progress, so hopefully I'll have the parts on Thursday. 

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Without a fan, if there's any overclocking going on, an '040 is quickly going to become the biggest or the next biggest cooling need.

 

The CPU is only a part of the system cooling budget, the PSU is a far bigger piece of that pie and it NEEDS to be cooled. That little fan on the floor of the LC is not a bad design choice at all, it does a lot more than you're giving it credit for, don't underestimate its importance.

 

Adequate airflow, but generally not great. (EDIT: But: it didn't have to be.)

 

Another suggestion that was made in this very thread was using a modern power supply, and given that even a 605's power supply is pushing 25 years old now, it may not be a bad idea, really. In general, my experience has been that power supplies (modern and old) themselves don't get particularly hot. The IIgs for example, had a power supply that could push ~40w (lower than some macs, but) and wasn't actively cooled. (You could do it, but you only really needed to if you filled like every expansion slot in the system.)

 

If the PSU is the component in a stock LC series system with the most critical cooling needs, my recommendation is definitely to flip everything and put it on top. At stock speeds, I don't think even an 040 is going to put off enough heat, and the scsi2sd and ethernet cards in this design might block airflow from the PSU enough (unless the case is much taller than those two things) that not enough air will be able to flow.

 

Of course, some kind of fan will do the trick -- and it really shouldn't matter whether you're pushing cool air into the system or pulling hot air out (presumably through the PSU, either way.) Especially with modern fans that can quietly move a lot of air.

 

 

And: perhaps this just happened to work because it was an open air environment (in the Arizona summer, but whatever) -- but like I said, I pulled my 475 out of its case, didn't install the fan anywhere, and put the PSU on its own on a table outside the new case and ran the whole thing for probably a few weeks with no trouble whatsoever.

 

I don't think the power supply will cause near the trouble you think it will, and for as insufficient as a 475 might be to cool an overclocked 40 -> 46MHz '040, or a 10k-rpm SCSI disk, it was probably wildly over-specced for cooling its own power supply.

Edited by Cory5412

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I pulled my 475 out of its case, didn't install the fan anywhere, and put the PSU on its own on a table outside the new case and ran the whole thing for probably a few weeks with no trouble whatsoever.

 

 

Yup, this has been my experience too, and is why I wasn't very concerned with cooling when I designed this Mini LC case. I'm not planning any overclocking. Maybe I'm completely wrong, but we'll find out soon because the laser-cut acrylic parts are arriving today! I put a few strategically-placed holes in the top lid, so I can take temperature measurements of a few different spots inside the case, and see how hot it gets.

 

I'm feeling unreasonably excited about the delivery of a few pieces of orange plastic. :)

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Nothing unreasonable at all, attempted correlation of delight and rational thought seems like the spec for a random irrational number generation algorithm.

 

Your level of excitement is definitely bi-coastal, intercontinental at the very least and likely worldwide given samuari-j's interest in your project. Oz represent? Too bad we don't have a member stationed in Antarctica. Any other intercontinental lurkers out there?

 

MQMTfx™ – AKA - MicroQuadraMiniTower©

 

My project won't be getting its own thread in hacks here, you've pretty much completed that one for me already! We've had a delightful multi-threaded case design jam session going here, a tangential detour to ThinkClassic's hacks forum and is now on final approach to a landing on my AppleDesigned display shelves in cardboard and acrylic.

 

Only bolting the rainbow hued 120mm disk access indicator to a clear plexi lid will remain to be done after its arrival from China. [:o)]]'>

 

s-l1600.jpg

 

Collaboration on this kinda crap is the Bombe!

 

mj's photographic input a Lego Bricked Missile Command front bezel prototype remains to be printed in color, spraymented to posterboard and then glued onto the corrugated side panel. [:o)]]'>

 

Can't wait to see your upcoming photo spread Big Guy!

Edited by Trash80toHP_Mini

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Of course, some kind of fan will do the trick -- and it really shouldn't matter whether you're pushing cool air into the system or pulling hot air out (presumably through the PSU, either way.) Especially with modern fans that can quietly move a lot of air.

 

< snip >

 

I don't think the power supply will cause near the trouble you think it will, and for as insufficient as a 475 might be to cool an overclocked 40 -> 46MHz '040, or a 10k-rpm SCSI disk, it was probably wildly over-specced for cooling its own power supply.

 

Flipping the fan over to push air into the top of the case and directly onto the CPU is likely the best possible solution (egregious exaggeration of concept outlined above) outside of resorting to the use of a tiny, conventional PSU integrating solutions to Power/Cooling Budget requirements in a single component. Apple's bottom up/next to CPU implementation neatly baffled sound output from the tiny fan.

 

We've gotta remember that everything about this mulithreaded, multiple form factor design exercise stemmed from***** Big's rant about the size and dB level output of the RoadapplePPC enclosure for his 40MHz Q630 build. The blame for none of this falls upon me! [:o)]]'>

 

 

 

Have the parts arrived yet?

 

 

Edited by Trash80toHP_Mini

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Aforementioned rant: Performa 6205 - YUCK!

 

***** That was probably the mother of all edit boo boos in the long and sordid history of my post editing for typo/grammar correction. Let's blame it on the quirks of learning to use the new split keyboard?

 

< summation of lost text >

 

Convection cooling of (mostly) cellulose kindling based case construction materials already out the window.

 

I can't justify buying a SCSI2SD for the <mjMCMQMT< build, rooting through the parts bins for zero cost solutions is the plan.

 

10,000 RPM of 73.4GB worth of spinning rust will provide a considerable amount of much more appropriate gyroscopic stability.

 

2.5" IBM Savvio SCA server drive controller's component side should be more visually appealing.

 

Aux PSU: check: nekkidized lump-onna-rope from laptop IDE/SATA->Desktop IDE adapter kit

 

Spare Ultra SCSI3 SCA -> 50Pin, ultra slow Q605 SCSI adapter: check

 

Big@$$ fan takes care of cooling both radiant heat producers

 

/summation of lost text>

Unfortunately, disk access indication isn't in the SCA connector spec so I'm hoping it's on one of the front mounted edge connector contacts and has the juice to drive multiple LEDs.

The slow boat approach of the dual-purpose LED/Fan that's my only planned monetary expenditure affords me the opportunity for plenty of Illustrator time in working out fitment issues and sheet metal tool playtime with the leftover aluminum roofing flashing from the TwiggyGambit project.
 

 

Have the parts arrived yet?

 

< /are we there yet? [:o)]]'> >

Edited by Trash80toHP_Mini

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post-1779-0-25375600-1499994610_thumb.png

 

I fear it's lost in some UPS black hole, because it's just been bumping around within a few miles of here for two days. Tracking still says it will be delivered today, but as it's already past 6 pm, I'm not too optimistic.

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