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what causes LCD rot?

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On 9/23/2018 at 11:55 PM, goncalo said:

I’m having this issue of “lcd rot” in many systems. Symptoms vary - from cracked panels to fungi-like patterns

first it was a Digital HiNote 486 laptop - it was carefully stored in a horizontal shelf without any other weight on top - the screen cracked al liquid cristals came pouring out.

Some compaq LTEs are also turning up with strange patterns. They have had no physical stress placed upon, but all of the sudden the lcds start to rot.

Two PowerBook 160 have also developed cracks and air bubbles within the lcd layers.

This is a serious concern to those that collect and enjoy having these old machines in working condition..

So, just to clear things up.

There where no "liquid crystals pouring out", it was the adhesive pouring out.

And while thinking about the aforementioned crack, I wonder if is there a relation between the angle of the polarizer and the angle of the crack on the film.

That could mean this panel uses a 90-degree polarizer since the crack is at about 95/100 degrees.

 

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On 10/29/2018 at 12:46 AM, Byrd said:

I would say it's far from definitively solved?  Unless we can find a cheap substitute replacement polariser film, LCDs will continue to degrade over time.

 

When I said solved, I meant the mystery syndrome, not solved as in cured.

 

4 hours ago, goncalo said:

So, just to clear things up.

There where no "liquid crystals pouring out", it was the adhesive pouring out.

And while thinking about the aforementioned crack, I wonder if is there a relation between the angle of the polarizer and the angle of the crack on the film.

That could mean this panel uses a 90-degree polarizer since the crack is at about 95/100 degrees.

 

 

What exactly do yo mean by "pouring out" as in the adhesive is deadhering? It's clumping? It's crystalizing?

 

I'm curious as to exactly what the adhesive for the polarizer is doing. If we can characterize what is happening to it, then it might be possible to come up with how and why, which can possibly lead to a way to protect systems that aren't yet impacted. My best bet, from seeing the pictures only, is some kind of chemical reaction is happening to the adhesive. Now, what exactly that chemical reaction is, needs to be determined.

Edited by Paralel

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