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Bolle

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  1. Bolle

    SE/30 Logic Board Resurrection

    Page 9 only lists test points as far as I know. You don’t need to check those.
  2. Bolle

    SE/30 Logic Board Resurrection

    Do the same with the SWIM and both VIAs.
  3. Bolle

    SE/30 Logic Board Resurrection

    The numbers next to the ends of the traces show on which page of the schematics those signals appear again. Lets take the chip select signal of the SCSI chip for instance: /CS is on pin 17 of the IC. Apple calls this signal /SCSI. Now if you open page 3 of the schematics you will see the /SCSI signal again. This time it is referring to page 6. You will find it right below the middle of the page on the left. It is going to the GLUE at pin 24. If there is more than one number next to a signal at the edge of a page it will appear on all the pages that are called.
  4. I have a lot of CPU cards... guess I should dump all the flash chips sometime soon. I think there were XServes with 1GHz single CPU and 2MB cache. Those probably did run at 1:4 as well though.
  5. They are connected. You can even see that in your picture. You ripped a part of the trace that was connected to the pad. You can repair that with a tiny piece of wire to form a new pad. You can solder the wire to the via that is right next to where the trace ripped.
  6. Bolle

    Picked up a Mac IIci with some accessories!

    That cache card looks interesting. Can you get a picture of that one as well? Certainly not your standard Apple cache card.
  7. The Minipro TL866 can read them. Not sure anymore of what kind of chip they were but I think they were marked with manufacturer/model. Not sure if there is a software way to read them... probably not.
  8. There is no way to set those in OF at boot time other than changing the values in the flash chip on the CPU module. OF reads the configuration from there and applies the settings to the registers accordingly. I have seen some documentation on what is stored on those chips in some Motorola documents somewhere... Pretty sure Apple just used the standard Motorola design there so you might be able to find out about the underlying structure of what's inside the flash. Two examples I dumped before: 1Ghz Single 7455A 1MBL3 MDD: FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF C9300801 3030392D 36343535 01169B41 8410C0BC 8410CCBC 00000000 01120611 00000000 01140641 05780500 ED7E08C4 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF 1.42GHz Dual 7455B 2MBL3 MDD: FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF C9300801 3030392D 36343131 02169B41 8410C0BC 8410CCBC 00000000 01120611 00000000 01150661 05780200 ED3308DB 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF It apparently has an Apple part number in it that differs between both (first line that is not FFFFFs...) The rest has to hold information about the module itself, cache speed, etc...
  9. Bolle

    Two SE 1/20 do not accept floppies

    edit: -got confused-
  10. Bolle

    Two SE 1/20 do not accept floppies

    Apple did not always install filters with R-C-R networks. Some boards have simple resistor packs instead of the filter networks. Start by checking the series resistance of each pin pair. If you desolder the filter you can also measure the capacitance for each pin. The actual value will be off though because the resistors. You could do some maths to calculate the actual value if your multimeter comes with a proper datasheet. I usually only check if no capacitor is shorted out and if the capacitance is in the same range for all of them.
  11. Bolle

    Major Setback!

    Is the board booting fine otherwise and you just get a corrupted image on screen? In that case I would take a look at the VRAM address muxes (UA8-UD8) and video line and column counters (UF8 and UG8) first. Also have all traces going to them checked for continuity.
  12. Bolle

    Two SE 1/20 do not accept floppies

    Check if the resistor network next to the floppy port is ok on your boards. Also make sure you have the correct cable for 1.4MB drives. Not sure if this is a thing on the SE but there were Macs that needed the one with the yellow stripe for 800k drives and the one with the red stripe for 1.4MB drives. The drives would not work if used with the wrong cable. Those ROMs are FDHD and the floppy controller in that picture is a SWIM as well.
  13. Bolle

    New case of Simasimac -- at my wit's end!

    If you have corrosion on the ROM SIMM there might be corrosion on the socket as well. UE8 is usually fine if you get horizontal stripes on screen because that is the default content of the VRAM.
  14. The RTC also stores the PRAM. Some Macs will not work properly without it. You should reach the floppy icon/question mark but it might not boot from SCSI without the RTC chip.
  15. Traces around there do look good, but a lot of those vias where all the solder has been eaten away do not. Grab the schematics and check all traces in the startup circuit. Even if they look good they might have failed in places you can’t see. Those 74s logic chips could be bad as well but I would start with checking traces first.
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