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PotatoFi

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  1. PotatoFi

    Free Macintosh Plus!

    Whoa, okay, big gap in knowledge here... what is the loom?
  2. PotatoFi

    Brightness Knob on Macintosh SE

    I took the analog board back out, and gave the knob a bit of a twist to line it up better... a lot smoother now. I think I'm going to call this one fixed! We'll see if the old potentiometer is still bad after a good cleaning when I repair the next SE in the lineup.
  3. PotatoFi

    Brightness Knob on Macintosh SE

    Ok, I recapped the entire analog board (excluding that 3.9 uF cap and the power supply caps), and it didn't fix it. So I desoldered a working pot from my other SE, cleaned it out thoroughly with alcohol, and soldered it in... problem fixed! Except now, I have a new problem: the knob is very stiff due to it's interaction with the front panel (it turned normally before the analog board was installed). So I gotta figure that out. I am also going to try reinstalling the old potentiometer after cleaning it with alcohol.
  4. PotatoFi

    Ethernet via SCSI2SD V6

    Ok... this... this makes a TON of sense. Doing a modern AppleTalk/LocalTalk bridge moves us out of the realm of difficult and highly proprietary PDS or SCSI territory, and into something that *maybe* is better understood and easier to work with (AppleTalk/LocalTalk)? And to @Trash80toHP_Mini's point, the Raspberry Pi is easier to develop on. Moving it outside of the Mac unit resolves the lack of instant-on problems, and pushes it further into the "universal" territory - where everyone can take advantage of the project. So I'm super unaware of exactly what can be done over LocalTalk and AppleTalk. But for me, getting ethernet onto a Mac is for TCP/IP. I want to interact with the modern internet with my 30+ year old machine (if you're asking why, you're on the wrong forum). Would a modern, Raspberry Pi-based AppleTalk/LocalTalk bridge be about to route TCP/IP traffic?
  5. PotatoFi

    Ethernet via SCSI2SD V6

    Thanks for your input, but there's existing discussion about using a Raspberry Pi in conjunction with SCSI here. In the interest of staying on topic, let's discuss the Raspberry Pi options over there. I'll avoid going into the noted downsides of using an RPI here because they've already been discussed in the RaSCSI thread. I wonder at the possibility of emulating Farallon EtherMac/SCSI on the SCSI2SD. E.g., looking at how the Farallon driver talks to the EtherMac/SCSI, and just developing firmware for the SCSI2SD V6 that causes it to behave like a Farallon EtherMac/SCSI. Then the 68k driver problem is sorted. So the path to functionality looks something like this: Analyze, document how the Farallon EtherMac/SCSI driver talks to the hardware Emulate Farallon EtherMac/SCSI behavior on the SCSI2SD Get a specific USB Ethernet adapter driver working
  6. PotatoFi

    RaSCSI Development Thread

    To avoid hijacking the thread, I've started a new thread about SCSI2SD V6 ethernet support.
  7. PotatoFi

    Ethernet via SCSI2SD V6

    Over in the RaSCSI thread, @inertialcomputing mentioned that the SCSI2SD has USB support, and could theoretically support a USB ethernet adapter to function as a SCSI ethernet device. This is pretty intriguing... in compacts (Classic, SE, Classic II, SE/30), there are two major hurdles on these machines: storage and network connectivity. PDS cards are rare and super expensive, and when it comes to hard drives, it's not a question of if they will fail; it's a question of when. The SCSI2SD v6 sells for $100, which seems like a lot until you consider that it could replace both failing storage devices AND expensive ethernet cards. I sent an email over to the SCSI2SD developer about it, and there are two routes forward: a USB ethernet adapter via the USB header, or swapping the microcontroller for a similar model that supports 10/100 ethernet. Challenges involved with going the USB ethernet adapter route: The SCSI2SD has an unpopulated USB header that has never been tested; the original intention was for USB flash drives Would have to write a USB ethernet adapter driver (but there is possibly existing code available) Implement SCSI commands (there's no documentation about this, so it would be pretty difficult) Possibly writing System 6/System 7 ethernet drivers (sounds hard) Challenges involved with going the microcontroller route (swapping STM32F205 for a STM32F207) Not sure if the correct pins are broken out, even the SCSI2SD developer isn't sure as this was beyond the scope of his design Implement SCSI commands Write System 6/System 7 ethernet drivers So... possible, but unless we had some real development talent, it's not going to happen. Me personally: if I could contribute $50 to a project to make it happen and buy a $100 SCSI2SD V6, I would do it in a heartbeat. That's a $150 investment - the same price as an Asante card for my Mac SE, and if it helped open up the door for others to get network support, that makes it even more worthwhile. As for SCSI commands, I do have a Farallon EtherMac/SCSI, which could possibly be used as a starting point for figuring out SCSI commands. If that device could be emulated on the SCSI2SD, then that could remove the need to System 6/System 7 drivers. It just depends on how difficult the protocol analysis on that piece of hardware is. Way outside of my skillset.
  8. PotatoFi

    RaSCSI Development Thread

    That is great news. If the SCSI2SD can function as a USB host, host a USB ethernet adapter, and emulate a SCSI ethernet adapter, that would be very cool. The holy grail would be providing storage and ethernet at the same time. All of this sounds like a lot of work for a microcontroller. I'm keen to discuss more, but this probably needs to broken out into another thread (e.g. Network Connectivity via SCSI2SD v6).
  9. PotatoFi

    RaSCSI Development Thread

    To me, SCSI2SD already has the storage problem solved. What this project has potential for is to enable ethernet or Wi-Fi connectivity. For SE's and SE/30's, ethernet cards are $150, minimum. A $10 Raspberry Pi, an $8 USB to Ethernet adapter (if you want Ethernet), a $35 RaSCSI board, and a 3D printed internal mount or external enclosure sounds magical (sign me up to design and print those). And what if you could solve storage and connectivity with one device? Sounds like something @K55 could make money on. But... time. I completely understand the time thing.
  10. Great question... I have no idea. The only PDS ethernet card that I know of for the SE is the Asante MacCon (sometimes I see it called the Asante MacCon+). They are typically advertised for $150 on eBay. Thanks for the background information... I'll have to look and see if a Farallon card exits. But for the SE... I'm starting to think that a custom SCSI ethernet adapter is the way to go. But engineering that is way beyond my skill level (I can might LED's blink in fancy ways on an Arduino, that's about it).
  11. PotatoFi

    Tantalum recap success

    Jealous of your SE/30's... my dream Mac right there. I have recapped an SE/30 board for a friend (success) so I'm at least familiar with the logic board.
  12. I thought the SE and SE/30 chassis was the same as well. Seems like there’s plenty of room in there. Card position doesn’t really matter... crimp and RJ-45 onto a short CAT5E cable, route to a 3D printed bracket that holds a keystone punch down jack on the back of the SE or SE/30, and you’re good to go. Seems to me like the big hurdle is just seeing if these things are electrically compatible or not. If there’s anything I can to do help... I’m game. Including 3D printing plastic doodads.
  13. PotatoFi

    Tantalum recap success

    On one hand, YOU GUYS ARE FREAKING ME OUT. On the other, I lifted one pad while desoldering from an SE/30 board for a friend, so I don't have much room to argue here. @ants, nice work. Thanks for preserving another SE/30 logic board! I feel like those are a precious commodity, and every one that gets the PRAM battery replaced and new tantalum caps soldered in is just one more that will stay in the pool of surviving boards.
  14. I'm keen to start messing with this idea, but I have a bunch of SE's, and no SE/30. On top of that, the SE seems like a good place to start as they seem to be more common than the SE/30. In other words, blowing up an SE would be less heartbreaking than an SE/30. Is there a card out there I should try to find that I'd have better luck trying on an SE?
  15. PotatoFi

    Tantalum recap success

    How do you hold two irons and lift away the old capacitor at the same time? It's probably super obvious... but I'm just not seeing how.
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