Jump to content

PotatoFi

6502
  • Content Count

    225
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Profile Information

  • Location
    Boise, ID

Recent Profile Visitors

338 profile views
  1. PotatoFi

    Macintosh Classic Restoration

    Awesome, nice work! I think the saran wrap + cream + sun method is totally doable. A bit more risky, but if you babysit it like you did, and massage the cream every 10-15 minutes... you can achieve great results. And heat definitely speeds things up! Looking forward to seeing your serial setup!
  2. PotatoFi

    Macintosh Classic Restoration

    Gorgeous! Nice work, all around! What specific retrobrite method did you use?
  3. PotatoFi

    This Does Not Compute SE/30

    Holy freakin' cow @ThisDoesNotCompute, awesome video. That was worth the wait. Again, I don't want to spoil it, especially with the awesome build-up that you executed, so I'll refrain from talking about what fixed it here. Here's a few of my notes which hopefully help out with the machine going forward. Retrobrite: I did my SE FDHD in December, and if it has re-yellowed at all... it's barely, barely perceptible. I haven't seen the horror stories like you've shown in the video, and my Dreamcast and SNES that I did ages ago (referencing your videos, in fact) still look awesome. There's no brittleness. If/when you do retrobrite, I recommend full submersion in hydrogen peroxide + water like you did for your Gamecube back in the day. Be sure to pop the Apple logo out from the back, as the heat and hydrogen peroxide it can bleach out the red and yellow from the logo. Here's the most recent retrobrite I did, on my Classic II. Floppy Drive: If you don't intend to use the drive, this probably doesn't matter, but yours could use cleaning and lubrication. It looks like the eject motor is straining a bit, which can break the motor gear with extensive use. Taking it apart to clean and lubricate it is super easy. There's a video by What's Up TK Here, but it would be cool to see an updated video (hint hint). I use Dupont Teflon Silicon Lubricant for the sliding parts on mine. Not a ton of info here... but here's the last time I documented cleaning one of these drives. It's a bit messy because it's just a restoration log, not specific instructions. Speaker: I don't have experience with the SE/30, but I'll bet your speaker failure is due to bad caps on the analog board. I hope that helps, and thanks again for the fantastic video. Stoked that your SE/30 is up and running!
  4. PotatoFi

    Macintosh Classic II Restoration

    Thank you so much! I popped the case off and took a look, and sadly, I don't think I'm going to be able to help very much. Mine says "682k" on one side, and absolutely nothing on the other. Sorry that I can't be more helpful here!
  5. PotatoFi

    Macintosh Classic II Restoration

    Ok, time for the results! But first, a little disclaimer. I wanted to accurately capture the difference in yellowing, before and after. I decided to try using a white balance card with my DSLR, but in retrospect... I think it made the case look a lot yellower than it actually was. For the final result, I decided to shoot on full auto, and then manually adjust the white balance on the before photos to match as best as I can. That makes the photos I posted in the beginning a bit inaccurate... but I feel like these manually adjusted ones convey how much it changed pretty well. So here are the results! Here's a complete log of what I did: Cleaned and lubricated floppy drive Cleaned and recapped logic board Cleaned and recapped analog board Cleaned chassis and all other internal parts Disassembled and cleaned mouse and keyboard Retrobrighted the Mac itself, keyboard, and mouse Installed a new PRAM battery Took apart and reassembled drive (probably hurt more than helped) The only two things that are left are to max the RAM out to 10 MB, and replace the failing hard drive with a SCSI2SD. Both of those will have to wait a bit for funding, so for now, this Macintosh Classic II is DONE! If you have any questions about the restoration at all, be sure to let me know!
  6. PotatoFi

    Macintosh Classic II Restoration

    Totally will! Might take me a few days to get there. Today, I restored the mouse and keyboard! I'll warn you that there's no satisfaction at the end of this post... I need light to take good "after" photos of the whole system tomorrow, so that will be a separate post. Here's what I started with: You can clearly see where sunlight yellowed it, and where there were shadows. The first order of business: pull the keycaps! I 3D printed this keycap puller, which makes life a lot easier. All of the keycaps pulled: Before applying retrobrite, I always scrub everything. You know my methods at this point. I do each key individually, as well as the whole keyboard case. I think I mentioned this before, but it's worth mentioning again: always pop the Apple badge out before retrobrighting! Otherwise, the retrobrite can mess with the red and yellow colors. I use a paperclip and gently press from the back. I'm going to use peroxide cream instead of full submersion for the keys, because I haven't come up with a creative way to keep keys from floating around. I work on a cutting board so none of the keys get turned upside down when I move them. So here, I laid down some plastic wrap, arranged all of the keys, and used my trusty free-from-a-hotel-somewhere toothbrush to dab a bunch of hydrogen peroxide cream on each key. Plenty of cream is important here - you don't want anything to dry out. If a spot dries out, you'll get a bright spot and a marbling effect. Next, I fold the plastic wrap over the top, crease the edges, and roll up the end to create a mostly-airtight seal. It was evening at this point, and with cream and plastic wrap, I prefer to use the "low and slow" UV lamp, which minimizes the chances of things drying out and causing bleaching or marbling. Fast forward overnight and to today. At this point I haven't done the keyboard case or cleaned the mouse, so let's get the mouse cleaned up first. Here's the top: Pretty much the same condition as the Classic II was. Here's the bottom: I didn't get a picture of the mouse all cleaned up, oops. Satisfaction denied! I did grab some pictures of the ADB connector though. It's pretty gross, I like to pay a bit of attention to these since they're plugged into the keyboard. Alcohol and a toothbrush helped quite a bit, but it wasn't perfect: I worked on it with alcohol and baking soda, and that helped a bit more. As I write this, I realize that the majority of my hobby is just cleaning things... Don't forget the ADB cable itself... I scrubbed it down with a paper towel and alcohol. It looks nearly perfect now. And here's the final picture of the connector. It looks almost new, save the pink marker that I couldn't get off. At this point, the keys had been under a UV lamp in the garage at 80°F/26.5°C all night, so I pulled them out to take a look. I didn't take any photos of this, but I checked out the spacebar and it was almost done, but not quite. I freshened up the hydrogen peroxide and put them out in the driveway mid-morning to speed up the process. I only had them out there for about 40 minutes in total, rotating them a few times. With that much sun and heat, I watch parts with cream and plastic wrap SUPER closely. They absolutely can't dry out anywhere, or it will ruin the parts! I got the mouse shell and keyboard shell out in the tub of liquid hydrogen peroxide as well. The mouse ball retainer wanted to float, so I clipped a binder clip to it for some weight and that worked perfectly. The submerged parts stayed out there for several hours. The starting temp was 80°F/26.5°C, but after a few hours climbed to 105°F/40.5°C. \ Rinsing the keys after 40 minutes in the sun! It never takes long with that much UV, heat, and concentration of hydrogen peroxide. It's just a bit risky. Letting them dry. At this point, the parts in the liquid were constantly floating, and they seemed like they were completely done anyway. I pulled them out, rinsed everything off, dried them, and brought them inside for assembly. I didn't get any closeups of the keyboard shell, but it basically looks perfect. It was at this point that I realized that the locking mechanism on the Caps Lock key was broken, likely from my pulling on the keycap. I took the keyboard apart to see if I could fix it. I pulled up on the back metal plate, and undid clips one at a time while holding pressure. It let go bit by bit until it was free. After peeling up the membrane, the key switch in question fell right out. Apparently, this is a Mitsumi manufactured keyboard, and they used a proprietary locking switch here that wasn't used on any other keyboard model. There's almost nothing online about these. The only thing I could find was this page, which was super valuable. The part that broke is that little broken copper wire, which acts as the locking mechanism. The copper leafspring keeps pressure the wire. I spent a good hour attempting to make a replacement, but it was just too small to work with, and my wire diameter was slightly too large. I did try pulling the switch from my other keyboard, but it broke in the exact same way when I pulled the key, taking it apart. D'oh! Eventually, I gave up on repairs, deciding that the caps lock just won't lock on this keyboard anymore. Too bad... I love that clicky feeling when I need to yell at some people in an IRC chatroom... If anyone knows where I might be able to get a replacement switch (or two), please let me know. And on that terrible disappointment, it's time to end! I'll post final photos of the Macintosh Classic II, Apple Keyboard II, and mouse tomorrow when I have light! --- Also, one last photo that I cannot seem to remove no matter what I do:
  7. PotatoFi

    Macintosh Classic II Restoration

    The hard drive sounds a bit better this morning, but you can still hear the stuff that is worrying me. Hard Drive Noise.m4a
  8. PotatoFi

    SE FDHD Estate Sale

    Yes, some have sockets from the factory.
  9. PotatoFi

    Macintosh Classic II Restoration

    Thanks, Sam! Okay, time for another update. The very last thing to do on the Classic II itself before I restore the mouse and keyboard is to try to fix the hard drive. Before tearing it down, all I knew/could remember is that it wouldn't boot from it, but I did have a faint recollection that I couldn't hear the drive spinning up. Still, worth checking out! Now first, no PotatoFi thread is complete without a ridiculous amount of over-engineering... so I present to you, my Completely Custom 3D-Printed Glove Box! It has a HEPA filter in the back, a vacuum cleaner attachment on the side, and portals that hold gloves in on the front. The idea is that you can plug in a vacuum cleaner and flip it on for a second to purge all of the dust before getting to work. I could do a dedicated thread about this build if anyone is interested. I did build it specifically for Macintosh hard drives... but I could see myself using it for working on Game Boy screens as well. I'm going to attempt a hard drive repair per What's Up TK Here's video, in which he fills the drive with metal shavings and dust, but still manages to get his Mac booting! I figure that if he can do that in those conditions, I might be able to achieve success in my Glove Box (tm). I mean, the hard drive is dead, so what do I have to lose? First, I removed the warranty-voiding stickers. I didn't realize that this was exposing the internals, and if I'd known, I would have done this in the glove box. Next, I removed all of the screws. Again, wish I'd done this in the box. Next, into the glove box! After purging the dusty air, I carefully removed the top. I didn't get many pictures of this part, because getting your hands in and out of the gloves is pretty tricky, especially with the limited space in the box, and platters that you really do not want to touch. Many thanks to my wife for snapping this photo for me (just to answer that question)! Getting the three screws loose on the magnet required a trip to the hardware store for a #1 Phillips bit. I used a 1/4" drive ratchet and a small hex adapter, which gave me plenty of torque in the compact working space. Seriously, this glove box is just barely big enough to work in! And I felt like I was doing brain surgery with a flathead shovel. But, I steered completely clear of the r/w head armature and platters, and only removed the magnet to check the condition of the rubber bumpers. No pictures of this part, but sadly, I discovered that the rubber bumpers described in TK's video weren't gooey at all. In fact, they were in great condition. My heart definitely sank a bit at this discovery. Not much to do but put it back together. I resealed the holes with tape. Not expecting a miracle, I installed the drive and flipped the power switch. It didn't even spin up, no nope. I decided to shove the floppy disk in and let it boot up and hang out with me while I typed up this update. And then... just for fun... I gave it a reboot after about 5 minutes of sitting idle. It ejected the floppy, and the hard disk totally spun up! It made a horrible grinding sound, which quickly subsided and was replaced with a high-pitch metal-on-metal sound - probably a r/w head skating on a platter. But to my amazement, it booted up! I couldn't believe it! Not much interesting on the machine... a copy of Claris Works and a couple of password protected files. The disk seems to work fine other than the horrible sounds... which makes me think that it won't live for long. Ultimately, I think this machine needs a SCSI2SD, but that will probably need to wait for a couple of months for funding. So... a success? Nah, not really. It's possible that the drive would have eventually spun up anyway, so maybe I just made it worse? Oh well. Next, I'll restore the keyboards and mice, so stay tuned for that. I have some fun ideas about what to do about the missing keys!
  10. PotatoFi

    This Does Not Compute SE/30

    @ThisDoesNotCompute Nice work, super stoked that you got it going again! I'm looking forward to the eventual followup video!
  11. PotatoFi

    SE FDHD Estate Sale

    For $40, I think you did great! Worst-case scenario, you've got a bunch of usable parts. My policy with retro hardware like this is to try everything I can to get it working. If I can't get it working, then I keep it in circulation for parts. Someday we'll run out of these machines (especially things like CRT's). I'll bet the case would look like dynamite after some retrobrite!
  12. PotatoFi

    eBay find: upgraded SE

    What kind of shape is the logic board in? Typically, the SE doesn't suffer from leaky caps, but still, caps are caps. I would check the logic board first to see if the battery is leaking, or if the capacitors are leaking which will cause shorts. A quick fix is to remove the PRAM battery and gently scrub the board down with Isopropyl alcohol, let it dry for a few hours, and reinstall.
  13. PotatoFi

    Macintosh Classic II Restoration

    Capacitors came in today, HOORAY! Time to get to work, and hopefully have this Mac up and running! First, I marked all of the old caps on the analog board with a Sharpie, so it would be easy to keep track of what is done. Then I started replacing caps! My method is to heat one lead, rock the cap to one side, heat the other lead, rock it to the other side, and repeat until it pops out. Then, I swab out from under the old cap with alcohol to make sure nothing is left on the board. I replaced them one at a time to make sure I didn't mix anything up, and I referred to photos in this thread constantly to make sure the polarity was correct (although polarity is usually clearly marked on the board). All of the new caps have the exact same diameter, but not the same height: If there's a bunch of solder leftover, I'll use solder wick to clean out the holes before installing the new cap. I just bend the leads like this to hold it in place, add some solder, and trim with flush cutters (I absolutely love these ones). Check out these massive caps! They're the same diameter, but the new ones are much taller. Sharpie for scale. Here's all of the gross old caps. They even smelled bad as I desoldered them! There was sometimes some crackling and a sweet kind of smell, which I would assume was burning electrolyte. And here's the results! Check out that gorgeous, clean board full of fresh caps! This section was a particular pain, but it needed it the most. The results are so satisfying. The new caps are definitely shorter than the old ones. At this point, I decided to install the analog board and test it. One of my strategies for working around high voltage stuff is to do it as little as possible. I want to know that my work is good before diving into the logic board, which is easy to remove and work on with no discharge procedures or anything like that. It could also help me isolate a fault if I know that the analog board was good before recapping the logic board. I love how easily the Macintosh Classic II goes back together! The analog board is SO much easier to install on this than an SE. It has a channel that sits on the chassis, and two screws on the back. I moved my SE FDHD off the desk, plugged in a power cord and flipped the switch, and... Well, first off, it chimed, although very quietly. There was no sound before so that's already an improvement! But then, it only showed a single, bright dot in the middle of the screen. I instantly knew what that meant! I shut it back off very quickly to investigate, and... Ha yep, there's the problem. A bright white dot usually means a J1 connector issue on a Mac Plus, so I immediately knew what my mistake was. I plugged it back in and... Success! The Macintosh Classic II booted up to my 6.0.8L floppy with no hassle. Still no hard drive, but this proves that my analog board rework is good. Well... mostly. Sadly, while the sound did work,, it was super quiet. When cranked all of the way up, you could barely hear it chime. You can't really hear the monkey sound at all. I was pretty confused, but decided to press on. After playing Sim City on it for a bit, and mowing the lawn in the cool of the evening, it was time to tackle the logic board! First, I need to remove the old caps. I do this by grabbing them with a pair of pliers and twisti... Ha, gotcha! None of that nonsense here. Although since I don't have a hot air station, my method probably isn't a whole lot better. I carefully grip the old cap with tweezers, heat one side and gently rock it to one side, and then go do the same on the other side. I might have to heat each side 5 or 6 times as I work it loose, because I go as slow as possible. I haven't lifted a pad doing this yet (knock on wood)! Next I clean the electrolyte off with alcohol and a cotton swab: Next, I heavily tin all of the pads to the left. I'm a leftie, so that's the direction that I'll be coming at it with the soldering iron from. I don't tin the pads on the right. Note that I glob quite a but of solder onto the left-hand pads. Now for the fun part. To position the new capacitor, I firmly grab it with my tweezers, heat up the tinned pad, slide the cap into place, and remove heat as soon as it's positioned correctly. If I didn't quite get it right, I can heat the pad back up, move it around a bit, and remove the heat. I didn't get this one absolutely perfect because I was working around my iPad Pro, recording video. Sometimes if it doesn't seem like it's sitting flush with the board, I'll just push down on it with my tweezers and heat the pad up for the second. That always seats it nicely. After all of the caps in a given group are tacked down on one side, and I've double-checked that they are installed correctly, I add solder to the other side. Of course, I HAD to bump the board while recording this one but whatever. And here's the board, all done! Will it work? I actually have no idea. I'm going to plug it in right now. aaaaaaaaaaNNNNDD it works! Not only does it boot up, but the sound is much louder! I didn't think that sound issues would be due to bad caps on the logic board, but I guess I was wrong! Recapping the analog board brought the sound back, and recapping the logic board got the volume up to normal levels. And with that, I'm going to call it a night. Don't worry, there's still a lot more to do on this machine. We need to deal with the probably-stuck hard drive, get a PRAM battery installed, and we haven't even touched the keyboard and mouse!
  14. PotatoFi

    Macintosh Classic II Restoration

    Thank you! Hopefully these don't get too detailed... Anyway, things have been in a stall lately due to all of the activity around the 4th of July, and some other projects around the house. For example, I pulled CAT5e to our island and installed a wall-mount AP. Much better than than having a ceiling-mount AP laying around on the switch rack in the closet! This thing has an integrated 4-port ethernet switch, so plugging Macs into ethernet at on the kitchen island will be much easier. See how I tied it back in? And now you know where the "Fi" in my username comes from. I did a bit of reassembly, and when I installed the CRT, I gently vacuumed everything with the brush head on the vacuum. Then, I wiped the tube down with isopropyl alcohol and gently cleaned parts on the next with cotton swabs. There were a few parts (like the windings) that I didn't touch at all. One thing I REALLY appreciate about the Classic II is how you can stand it upright without the logic board being anywhere near your work surface. It's much nicer than the SE and Plus in that regard. Overall, this thing is just plain easier to work on. Ok, I need to list all of the capacitors on this board, but it's still SUPER gross. Look at all of the gunk everywhere! This time, I got another Pyrex dish, and went crazy with alcohol and a toothbrush. I scrubbed, rinsed, and scrubbed everything. Then I went after it with cotton swabs and more alcohol, just so I could get to a point where I could read the voltage and capacitance values! I also spent time with the toothbrush and alcohol on the wiring looms, CRT back board, and power switch. I was super careful to steer clear of the speaker... getting liquid on that would probably be bad. The back was nasty too. Here's before: And here's after. I think all of the damage was from the group of large capacitors on the other side of the board! I also worked on the shield. Before: And after I attacked it with Windex! I was careful to avoid the check mark next to "120V", which looks like it was done with a Sharpie. And here's the whole board after cleaning. I'm especially proud of the anode wire, anode cap, and the back board. They look brand new! Now I can finally determine capacitance values, voltage, diameter, and lead spacing for all of the capacitors. As you may have noticed, I did need to desolder CP36 to read the values. Look at how far gone this thing is. I'll bet all of the other capacitors nearby are in similar condition. I can't wait to get these all removed and thrown away! Now, on to the capacitance values. I couldn't find a list of Macintosh Classic II analog board capacitors anywhere, so here's a quick list (and here's a link to a complete spreadsheet): CF1: 47 uF, 25v CF2: 220 uF, 16v CF3: 1000 uF, 16v CF4: 470 uF, 25v CL1: 1000 uF, 25v CL2: 4.7 uF, 250v CL3: 1 uF, 50v CL11: 47 uF, 16v CP1: 220 uF, 250v CP2: 470 uF, 50v CP3: 10 uF, 25v CP4: 47 uF, 25v CP5: 1 uF, 50v CP6: 2200 uF, 10v CP7: 1000 uF, 10v CP8: 2200 uF, 16v CP9: 470 uF, 25 v CP10: 470 uF, 25 v CP11: 220 uF, 50v CP12: 1000 uF, 16v CP13: 220 uF, 250v CP34: 1 uF, 50v CP36: 2200 uF, 10v CP37: 1 uF, 50 CV2: 470 uF, 10 I also purchased tantalum SMD's for the logic board, here they are in a grouped format: Quantity 3: 47 uF, 16v Quantity 2: 1 uF, 50v Quantity 8: 10 uF, 16v Specifying these particular caps is a bit tricky, because a length of 3.5mm is a bit short to reach the pads, and 6mm is way too long, and there are few packages in between. So I settled for 3.5mm for the smaller caps. Arrow.com was about $57 due to shipping and handling charges, so I tried Digi-Key and got everything for about $31. The spreadsheet has links to each part. Ideally, I'd share the BOM on Digi-Key but it doesn't look like I can freely share a link. Maybe a .CSV file would do the trick? Anyway, the next update should be about recapping the analog and logic boards!
  15. PotatoFi

    This Does Not Compute SE/30

    If connections all check out, what are the chances of this just being a bad ROM SIMM? I wonder if we could procure a known-good one to send to you to test. I'd volunteer if I had an SE/30, but sadly I do not.
×