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Warning! Exploding Maxell PRAM Batteries

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Looking at the chip it's not just as easy as soldering it back on, it has taken 3 of the 4 pads off with it...

That said, it should be repairable, just need to track the traces back to a another chip, or somewhere easy to solder and then run a wire

 

Things like this always remind me of the xbox i had shipped to me that was litterley wrapped in some cereal box cardboard and a layer of the thinnest bubblewrap i have ever seen... amazingly that still worked (well, sorta...)

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Looking at the chip it's not just as easy as soldering it back on, it has taken 3 of the 4 pads off with it...

That said, it should be repairable, just need to track the traces back to a another chip, or somewhere easy to solder and then run a wire

 

Things like this always remind me of the xbox i had shipped to me that was litterley wrapped in some cereal box cardboard and a layer of the thinnest bubblewrap i have ever seen... amazingly that still worked (well, sorta...)

 

Recently had something similar happen. Won a Sony receiver off eBay. Got it for $34, plus the $42.90 shipping. A week or so later, I receive a box that looks like it has been jumped on. Open it up, and discover the receiver at the bottom of the box with a cardboard box flap being used as "packing material". The lid has an "outie" dent on the side, there's a chunk of plastic missing from the side of the front panel, and the front panel is loose at the top. Surprisingly enough, everything works on it. So, I'm using it. I should've filed a claim with PayPal after the guy denied any wrongdoing... But, oh well. Now on the search for a dead STR-GX6ESII to pilfer the lid and the front panel parts from.

 

-J

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Those poor Macintoshes...I went through all my Macintoshes and pulled all the batterys out, Even the square ones that were in my Performa 631cd and Power Mac 5500/225. Both seemed ok but the one in the Power Mac seemed to be buldging. Seems I pulled it in the nic of time thanx to these posts and pictures. Someone was inquiring about the square ones so I thought I'd share what I found. I was lucky as none of my machines had any leaking batterys yet. I have also yet to find one maxell in my machines. Mostly the purple and blue ones in all my pizza box macs.

 

Qurious...once this has happened to those machines, has anyone had any luck bringing them back to life after the batterys go bad all over? The reason I ask is from time to time you see pizza box macs that had a battery eplode in them. I was wondering if they are reversable.

 

Nick.

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Before I knew what I now know, I pulled apart my first 68k Mac (an SE/30 from 2005), and found that the battery had leaked. I removed it and put it in a plastic drawer. I still have it, actually, and the whole drawer's a big mess. I really am glad that's not a computer!

 

I'd post a picture, but I think we've all seen enough atrocities for now.

 

c

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Just worked on a Classic for a guy referred to me by one of the Mac user group leaders in the area.

 

Inside his Classic was a Maxell. No leakage yet, but I'll be darned if it didn't have "I'm gonna corrode your board really soon" written all over it. Needless to say, it was removed right away. I'm almost positive this particular one was as old as the Classic itself, which was 23 years old and still being used as this guy's main computer.

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...which was 23 years old and still being used as this guy's main computer.
That's bizarre! :lol:

 

How can anyone use a Mac Classic (or, for that matter, any 68k or early PPC Mac) as a main computer in this day and age?

 

Why doesn't he upgrade to a Classic II or SE/30? :o)

 

c

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my boss said that he has friends and knows of other people that live way out in the sticks, they still use old computers and dial up to AOL, with their 14.4's and 28.8's

so that sounds about right lol.

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Should the title of this thread maybe be changed to Warning! Exploding Old PRAM Batteries?

 

It's been pretty conclusively shown that, although Maxells may be particularly prone, all old PRAM batteries are ticking time bombs.

 

I'd hate somebody to pop open their LCIII (or whatever) see a 20 year old green & purple, or blue, or white battery in there and think "whew, at least it isn't a red Maxell; I'm safe."

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Or a black Varta... That said, at least, when it came to a certain SE, the original Varta was still showing full voltage.

 

Just replace the batteries every 5-10 years, and you should be ok. That, or replace the PRAM battery holder with a pair of wires going to a triple AA holder. Plop some NiMH rechargeables in there, and call it good.

 

-J

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Has anyone ever had the 4.5 volt battery (found in e.g. the Power Macintosh 4400) explode or leak? I just removed mine to be sure.

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If it's lithium, which I suspect it is, it probably will eventually do so. Hmmm, wonder if that battery could be adapted to a Mac Plus, since the original 4.5 volt alkaline Eveready #523 batteries are almost impossible to find these days.

 

-J

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2 hours ago, xboxown said:

Ppphhewww...good thing apple //gs do not have to worry about leaking battery! Since they don't have one! Phhew!

Yes they actually do. They use the exact same 1/2 AA lithium battery that most of the Macs do!

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5 hours ago, PB145B said:

Yes they actually do. They use the exact same 1/2 AA lithium battery that most of the Macs do!

DOH!!!!! I guess when they went pseudo mac with it they really went pseudo mac!!!!

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You won’t see it immediately when you pull the cover off, because you also have to take the power supply out to see it.

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I wanted to ask about replacing the Apple //gs and Mac LC III batteries with no leaking and explosive ones. Are there safe batteries that I can replace for the Apple //gs and mac lc III that I don't have to worry about them leaking or exploding? What advice can you help in this?

 

One other question, does the mac lc III really need the battery? Can I do without it? 

 

 

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There really isn't a "safe" battery you can install in one of these systems, at least one that won't leak. The safest alternative would simply be to not install a battery at all, however many Macs won't boot without one. The IIGS can boot without the battery, although you'll lose all your settings, and from what I can gather the LC III can as well.

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I agree.

 

Most of them don't need batteries.

 

Only a few are required to boot (Macintosh II range except the IIsi / The LC 475 will need one IIRC or will not display any video) 

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I like to re-locate mine to the outside/rear of the computer using a AAA battery holder, and do it that way. In case it does leak or go bad, its on the outside and not inside, plus its easy to replace and off the shelf. 

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I'm planning on buying a bulk pack of batteries for the lab I use with the kids and installing them, then replacing them in 4 years.

 

The ones I have at home are easier since I can keep a closer eye on them. As soon as the battery fails, out it comes.

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Just to add a bit:

 

Yes, the Maxells seem to be the worst of the 1/2 AA lithiums, but the white-and-green ones are also pretty bad. Tadirans (purple and black) usually fail the least catastrophically but given enough time and/or poor storage conditions they too will leak.

 

If you notice, on the models with the square battery packs with the leads, the wires act as wicks when the batteries leak: the electrolyte travels from the bad battery all the way to the connector where it begins corroding the logic board connector and beyond. It's usually visible as a greenish blue tint on one of the wires at the connector.  If the leakage spills beyond the battery pack the velcro usually absorbs a lot of it which thankfully localizes and reduces the damage done.

This mode of failure also happens when PowerBook backup batteries leak. Yes, they will and do leak. The electrolyte will not only leak out of the battery pack and corrode anything around it, but is also wicked to the terminal of the connector where it inflicts damage to the logic board.

 

If you collect PowerBooks of any vintage, I highly recommend removing the backup batteries from all of them. Some still have replacement battery packs available, if you really need to be able to sleep-swap the main battery. I have yet to see one of the soldered backup batteries from the original 1x0 series cause any problems but it's likely only a matter of time before they do. Also, do not store the PowerBook with its main battery installed. This should be common knowledge but from as many ruined models as I've seen it apparently isn't.

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On 11/12/2013 at 9:28 PM, volvo242gt said:

If it's lithium, which I suspect it is, it probably will eventually do so. Hmmm, wonder if that battery could be adapted to a Mac Plus, since the original 4.5 volt alkaline Eveready #523 batteries are almost impossible to find these days.

 

On 11/12/2013 at 10:46 PM, techknight said:

The ones you do find, are actual "hacks" using button cells or something of the like, and a homebrew wrap to make that particular battery.

Dunno about the size issues, but it sounds like it might be possible to design a printable replacement battery cover to hold button cells using springy copper (brass/whatever) strips for the contacts. Maybe a two part design that with an outer portion that acts as a cup with the lead for the bottom contact looping up and out of the cup? Maybe put V notches thinning the strips to the point that they corrode away within the cup in case of failure before strip wicking can get to the machine contacts?

 

On 11/13/2013 at 2:32 AM, volvo242gt said:

Yep... I guess I could see about machining a brass (or copper) spacer, then just use three PX76's...

Your suggestion's what got me musing about printable holders. Even a hunchback cover for the Plus- series wouldn't be unsightly. A platinum painted 3 AAA holder would Velcro nicely over the squarish copy panel of my Quadras with Kynar leads looped through the security slot to a printed battery dummy with MAXELL and olePigeon's skull & crossbones in "raised" letters in a sunken panel. [}:)]

 

Picturing printed PowerBook holders for smaller modern cells, but that's blur filtered  .  .  .

 

Coffee mug needs a warmup, I'll decide how dumb all this sounds later when I wake up  .  .  .  after a third mug or so. ::)

 

edit: fixed some typos and now wondering if only a platinum snap-on cup/cover for a stock 3 AAA holder might work on the modular Macs? SE/SE/30 would need a color coded or keyed header lead setup? Copy panel location works there as well.

 

Edited by Trash80toHP_Mini

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