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How do I burn a CD-Rom to be read in OS 7.0?

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Hello-

 

I'm new to the forum and to 68k macs. I recently purchased a Mac Classic 4mb ram, 40mb HD and added a SCSI CD Rom Drive.

 

Is it possible to burn a CD to be read under OS7.0? I have 2 PC's with Vista and XP and also own a G5 Mac with OSX. I read in another forum how to burn a disk in OSX to be read in OS7.5. I tried this in OSX by creating a disk image and save it as Mac Standard, drag the files on it and then burn it. But my Classic won't recognize it.

 

Is there any other way to do this? Any help is greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Paulo

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You are going to need apple's CD Driver.

 

I can't recall where you can get one. Maybe one of the kind 68kmla'ers will help on that. I tried to do a google search, but nothing came up :-/

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Thanks for your reply. I already installed the Apple Cd-Rom driver. I downloaded it from macdrivermuseum.com

 

The error message I get on the Classic when I boot it up with the burned CD-Rom in the drive is something like "This disk is in a newer format - OS can't read it" with 2 button options "Eject" and "Initialize"

 

Do I have the wrong CD driver installed or can't OS7.0 simply not read the "Standard Mac OS" format I burned in OSX?

 

Any help greatly appreciated.

Thx.

Paulo

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Firstly, are you using a CD-R or CD-RW disc? Most old drives will only read a CD-R.

 

Secondly, Mac OS Standard format (HFS) is the one you want, not HFS+ nor ISO 9660. (yes, a Mac will read an ISO 9660 disc with the right software installed, but its just easier to use HFS)

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I burned the CD-R in Mac OS Standard Format.

 

I was wondering if I have the wrong driver installed? The only driver I found is the 5.3.1 and says it was released with OS 7.5. But I have OS 7.0 installed on my Classic. So I was wondering if it might be a problem with the older OS. But then again, when I get the error message upon boot-up and click eject, the CD-Rom drive ejects the CD-R, which tells me that the Classic must somehow recognize the CD-Rom drive...?

 

Paulo

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One problem I've had is that my Apple CD-ROM drives don't like 700 MB media. I've been told on several occasions that it shouldn't matter, but it does.

If you can locate some old 650 MB CD-Rs it might be worth a try.

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What I'm suggesting is mostly to verify that your setup works, and if not it will help you sort out individual problems. Afer all, trying to sort out what could be a hardware problem (e.g. the CD-ROM may not work properly), and a technology problem (e.g. the CD-ROM may not be able to read CD-R media), and a software problem (e.g. you may be burning HFS+ CDs) all in one step is kinda hard.

 

If you have an old Mac CD, see if your Classic can read that. Almost anything prior to 1995 should do. If it works, you're in good shape. If it doesn't work, and you've installed the Apple drivers, you may have problems with your CD-ROM drive.

 

Once that works, try to find an old pressed ISO-9660 CD. Do not use a CD that claims to support the Mac. Almost anything prior to 1995 should do. If it works, you're still in good shape. If it doesn't work, you have problems with the CD-ROM drivers. Ensure that they are installed properly.

 

Now try burning an ISO-9660 CD. Pretty much any CD burning software on the PC or Mac should be able to do that. Then try reading it on the classic. If your classic cannot read it, it probably has trouble with the CD-R media. Do a Google search to find solutions for that.

 

Now for the tricky part, burning an HFS CD. You probably don't want to do this, but it will make life easier once you figure out how to do it. The link that porter ported out will probably work. If not, ensure that it is making a real HFS CD. Unfortunately, a lot of software likes to play dumb and pretend that HFS is the same as HFS+ -- when they certainly are not the same!

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I agree with TripleTwo's advice but...

 

I just tried to connect to macdrivermuseum.com and it was an advertising site. Thus I don't know what the OP has installed.

 

I'd go straight to the Apple legacy download pages (wading through drivel) and download the last version of Apple CD-Setup that supports System 7.0. The CD extension only provides access to HFS disks; you need the additions to read 9660, audio etc. Make sure that you have the extensions.

 

CD-RW media is unlikely to work with any Mac with a SCSI optical drive. Research OSTAR and UDF for background.

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System 7.5.3 can read burnt CD-ROMs quite nicely. This is on a Quadra 605.

If you're using Toast, make sure to choose the Mac format, and a nice-low speed if you've got an old drive like I do.

I haven't gotten my Mac Classic to recognize a CD-ROM, even with the Apple CD extension installed. I'm using an Apple 300e.

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I haven't gotten my Mac Classic to recognize a CD-ROM, even with the Apple CD extension installed. I'm using an Apple 300e.

 

I've been able to get compacts to work with CDROMs, even with System 6. A couple of problems seem to be common:

 

1) Other than factory-pressed media tends to be unreadable in older drives, or readable only with errors. Some brands of CD-R media might work in these (but don't count on it), but CD-RW is pretty much hopeless. The reflectance is just too low to operate in a drive that hasn't been specifically designed for CD-RW support.

2) Some older drives may have difficulty with 700MB discs. The track-following servos may have insufficient margin to handle the slightly tighter track pitch.

3) SCSI termination/power issues tend to frustrate. Compact macs can't supply termination power, so the external drive has to provide it.

4) When using a CDROM drive with System 6, it is absolutely essential to use Desktop Manager to prevent futile attempts at desktop-rebuilding.

5) If audio support is not needed, CDSunrise is a gem of a driver. It's small, for one thing (ideal for resource-constrained compacts), and it seems to work with just about every drive.

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Thanks to all for the helpful tips. I will try those things out, but I'm actually now facing a bigger problem. I don't know if I should post a different thread for this... I'm also dealing with the Zebra-Stripe syndrome at boot-up, which developed shortly after I got the Classic about 3 weeks ago. It will boot once and then if shut down and restarted it won't boot. It freezes up with the striped screen. I read in other forums and eveything pointed to the battery as the culprit. So yesterday I replaced the battery but the problem persists. What else does cause this? The stripes are horizontal. I took the motherboard out yesterday to replace the battery. While at it I looked for any capacitor leak residue, but didn't see anything suspicious... Any ideas what else can cause these symptoms?

 

Thanks.

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If I recall correctly, the stripes are also a symptom of bad RAM. I don't know how you would deal with this on a Classic though. (If it has a RAM card, pull it out then see if it boots. If it's onboard RAM, I don't have a clue.)

 

I too am a fan of CDSunrise, but it doesn't support ISO9660 CDs either. While that isn't an issue if you know that you are using HFS CDs, I do believe that it makes it more difficult to test CDs burnt on modern systems (simply because some programs aren't good at specifying whether they are burning HFS or HFS+ CDs).

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Statistics are such that your problem is almost certainly due to capacitor leakage. If you look very carefully at the logic board, I am willing to wager that you will see some residue.

 

By all means, reseat/replace ram, wiggle connectors, sacrifice a chicken, etc. Those are easy things to do, so there's no reason not to try them. But if, as is unfortunately likely, those actions don't bring joy, clean the logic board and then replace the caps.

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Well, I purchased a 600e DC drive for my SE/30. That didn't work, but a pulled 300i did fit in the CD case and it works quite well. Older drives can't read CD-RWs and they must be Mac OS standard formatted. You can make a Mac OS standard image in Disk Utility for OS X. Then burn the image on a CD-R.

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Make sure you are using something like Toast to burn the CD on your G5.   Forget Apple's built in cd burning.  Depending on the version of Toast you have you may need to enable legacy formats in the prefs. 

 

Also if your Classic has not been recapped and you are still seeing issues it most certainly needs it.  Even if you don't see residue, it can be hard to spot at a glance as dust can cover it up some.  Take a cotton swab and swab some areas near the caps and you will probably see some residue on it.  I would remove the caps, clean the board and pads and reinstall new caps then clean the board again or at least the areas near the caps.

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