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Upgrading RAM in SE

Should I open it up?  

24 members have voted

  1. 1. Should I open it up?

    • Yes
      22
    • No
      2


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I'm getting a lot of out of memory messages on my SE which has 1MB of RAM. I see that I can max out the RAM for less than $3. However, I'm wondering how safe it is since it has a CRT. I wonder if I'll get shocked and die. If I would open the SE, I'd leave it unplugged for a few days first. To get to the RAM slots, would I have to get very close to the CRT? How long should I leave it unplugged? Is there anything else that I should make sure of before opening it? Should I even open it?

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I would never open one of those things myself as I am too scared, but most of the others here will tell you that they've done it a million times before and it's nothing, and that the shock wouldn't even kill you if you got it, so it's up to you :)

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Working inside a Compact is perfectly safe so long as you exercise necessary caution around the CRT. Best thing to do is allow it to discharge for a few days, (as already mentioned), and don't turn it on when you're working inside. Also, be careful not to knock the back off the tube as they are awfully easy to break since the glass is quite fragile.

 

Your SE will certainly appreciate the extra RAM!

 

Good luck!

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Macman is totally right! I is not hard to add ram to an SE or other compact mac as long as proper precautions are taked,,,,i have done so many times!

 

When I do it I also leave to machine of for at least 24 hours, then carefully remove the back cover by backing out the 4 screws holding it in place. Once that is done, carefully unhook the necessary cables, and slide out the motherboard, (and as already mentioned be careful not to break the neck of the crt...it is fragile)!

 

when you get ready to do it...if you feek you need any advice feel free to touchbase with me and i will try to help in any way i can!

 

Sacmac

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In your favour is that it may become the new buzzword of a generation, especially amongst the touchy-feely types: feek = seek and feel.

 

de

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Yeah, obviously you've been convinced to go ahead with the memory install. I've done it on an SE and a Plus.

 

I wouldn't wear rubber gloves. I think the loss of dexterity would be more dangerous. Go slow. I've found that some of the connections take a little more force than I'm comfortable with given the circumstances. Also, the speaker connection seems easy to screw up on the SE. maybe it's just me. Give yourself plenty of time, and space.

 

Sounds like you don't need the torx screwdriver, but for reference, I got one at sears in the last 6 months. Craftsman part #47181. 6" T15.

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You do need a Torx-15 driver for the bucket-retaining screws, even if the deeply-recessed top screws are missing. To reach inside the top recesses the shank must be 8in. long, or more, for comfort. Using a cross-point driver on the case screws risks permanent damage to the Torx indent, and you may also wish to replace the top screws at some future time. The top screws are coarse-threaded (to engage with plastic) and bright-metal, to distinguish them from the dark-metal bottom screws, which are metal-threaded.

 

As long as you take care to do it when there is no disk-reading occurring, if you crank up the screen brightness to maximum and pull out the mains cable (not switch off the Mac), the high potential across the glass of the CRT collapses instantly. You still need to ground the switched-off Mac when you work inside, of course, for the logic board's sake, and you must also avoid impact with the neck of the CRT.

 

de

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I think the threat of being shocked doing a RAM upgrade to a compact is overhyped. Sliding the motherboard back to access the memory slots doesn't really put you in close contact with high voltage and there ways to safely discharge the CRT that you can Google for if you still don't feel comfortable doing it.

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I've disassembled many compacts many times since I was 14, and I have yet to be shocked. I've replaced pretty much everything except the CRT and analog board at one time or another, including the little fan in a Classic II. I won't lie and say that there's no danger, but I can say that, as long as you're careful, it's unlikely that you'll get zapped. Just stay away from the back of the CRT, the suction cup-looking thing on the top of the CRT (anode) with the thick wire going to a large black or red box (flyback transformer) on the analog board, and the analog board in general, and you'll be fine. Working underneath the CRT where there are no connections to it presents very little chance of zappage, and that's where most of your time would be spent as far as drives and the logic board are concerned.

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