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#61 MarNo84

MarNo84
  • 6502
  • LocationRottenburg, Germany

Posted 23 May 2017 - 02:01 PM

When I had to finally fix my keyboard, it was a waterfall effect.  Only a few keys were broken, and after I took off the PCB and started replacing those pads, then more degraded to the point where the keys stopped working.  Now I replaced all of the foam pads with a complete set that DOESN'T work at all.  So I literally have no keyboard now.. be careful :)

Yep..that's a typical thing with these Pads..nearly the same effect with Commodore SX64 Keyboards :wink: never try to fix just one single key..fix them all in one job. Well, I better don't open my keyboard until the first key stops working [8D]


Edited by MarNo84, 23 May 2017 - 02:02 PM.

My Collection: www.marnoweb.de & www.classic-computer-collection.de & MarNoWeb @YT:  www.youtube.com/channel/UCyaeYrRq3IpohMUleaODrUw
I like: pre 1990 portable/luggable/compact & All-in-One Systems


#62 stepleton

stepleton
  • 6502

Posted 23 May 2017 - 10:17 PM

Yep..that's a typical thing with these Pads..nearly the same effect with Commodore SX64 Keyboards :wink: never try to fix just one single key..fix them all in one job. Well, I better don't open my keyboard until the first key stops working [8D]

 

When you do open your keyboard, as you will have to do eventually (the pads will all degrade someday), please use extreme care when disassembling the caps lock key. The tiny spring and pin that are part of the key locking mechanism can easily fall out, and if they do, since they are extremely small, they can be very difficult to find on a work surface (or the floor!).

 

In fact... during my own key pad replacement, I had the misfortune of having the spring in the caps lock mechanism shoot that little pin right into my eye! No harm done, luckily, and even more fortunately my wife and I managed to find the pin (which bounced off my eye) and spring rolling around on the floor.

 

As dramatic as the whole procedure was for me, I wouldn't let this risk stop you from replacing your key pads---if you are aware of the issue and treat the caps lock key with care, you probably won't have a problem.



#63 falen5

falen5
  • 6502

Posted 23 May 2017 - 10:42 PM

Thats a great bit of info stepleton as I have that repair ahead of me in the near future. First timer!!

 

I already opened the keyboard as far as removing the main pcb to have a look at the pads, took one look and quickly put it back together

 

At what part of the repair are you referring to , when I actually take the caps lock key apart?

 

I thought it was just a case of peeling off the old pads and sticking on new ones ?

 

Really appreciate the heads up



#64 stepleton

stepleton
  • 6502

Posted 24 May 2017 - 11:33 PM

Thats a great bit of info stepleton as I have that repair ahead of me in the near future. First timer!!

 

I already opened the keyboard as far as removing the main pcb to have a look at the pads, took one look and quickly put it back together

 

At what part of the repair are you referring to , when I actually take the caps lock key apart?

 

I thought it was just a case of peeling off the old pads and sticking on new ones ?

 

Really appreciate the heads up

 

You know, that's actually an excellent question. Now that you mention it, I don't really remember why I had such an experience with the caps lock key---it was a few years ago that I did my pad replacement, and I can't remember why it was necessary to do anything besides dig the old pads out and clip the new ones in place. Why did I even need to mess with that mechanism in the first place?

 

To try and refresh my memory, I did a little search and found this page with lots of pictures of the inside of the keyboard. There isn't a good picture of the caps lock key mechanism, but if you search for the string "bottom key switch profile", the image just above it shows the bottom of the keyswitches, with the caps lock key barely visible all the way to the right. Here is a direct link to the image itself...

 

You can see a white plastic frame surrounding the bottom of the keyswitch, and if I remember correctly, this is a molded piece of plastic that holds the whole locking mechanism in place (and may even incorporate the shaped channel that the pin I mentioned slides around in). My advice is to treat this plastic piece with caution! Try not to let it move, because (if I remember correctly now) if it slips off, the spring and pin will be exposed.

 

Please take this all with a grain of salt---it comes from some old memories, obviously---but one thing is for sure: when replacing your keyboard pads, treat the caps lock key with care!


Edited by stepleton, 24 May 2017 - 11:34 PM.


#65 falen5

falen5
  • 6502

Posted 25 May 2017 - 11:01 AM

Thanks so much stepleton

 

More great info and pictures there. Will most definitely be paying special attention to the caps lock.

There is nothing worse , taking something apart, and that sudden 'ping' as you hear something flying past your head, followed by the ding, ding ding as it hits the floor, never to be seen again.

Its happened to u all. Spending ages , on the floor with a magnafying glass, trying to find a tiny spring or screw or washer.

 

Im still waiting on the eprom programmer, it is due. With some luck i will get the machine to power up.

Still no hard drive for it, so If I can get the machine working the keyboard will be next.

 

I plan on making a video of replacing the pads as i cant find one online.

 

Will be so funny if I have the camera rolling and after your advice the caps lock spring takes off like a scud missile, ill just have to post it.

 

really appreciate the help and advice folks.






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