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MacIPpi - Surf the Internet on your old Macintosh with TCP/IP over LocalTalk

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A standard CUPS installation on most modern Linux-i supports automatic translation of Postscript jobs (regardless of the native language of your physical printer; Postscript has been the de-facto language output by WYSIWYG UNIX programs for decades.). Assuming that's working on your CUPS installation you should be able to use the regular LaserWriter/Laserwriter Plus drivers.

It's been ages since I last set up NetaTalk printing but I don't recall it being particularly difficult. Just make sure that your basic CUPS infrastructure is working and autofiltering Postscript *before* you get started so you're only troubleshooting one thing at once.

Note also that strictly speaking if you're running System 7-something or later you can share directly to an LPR/LPD TCP printer without bothering with Appletalk. Here's a rundown on how to create a "Desktop Printer" pointing to LPR using a utility included in one of the Apple Laserwriter driver updates:

http://main.system7today.com/articles/tutorials/osxprintsharing.html

 

The article focuses on System 7.6.1, but I know I've done this from 7.5.5, at least.

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The MacIPpi solutions are mostly used for bridging TCP/IP over AppleTalk. But it becomes more and more a swiss pocket knive for networking with old Macintosh.

So adding samba, PPP and even printing, etc. could be nice goal for future versions. I never ever printed form old Macintosh to modern printers, so it is a little bit off my confprt zone. But I will test.

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@mactjaap, what did you do to set up the tunnel and NAT? I am attempting to run your VirtualBox image on my ESXi (VMware) cluster, but am encountering some issues. The ESXi network interface ended up recognized as a different interface in Debian and wasn't connecting to anything, but that was easily resolved. Now I am attempting to figure out how you set up the NAT, but it doesn't appear you used iptables.

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This doesn't look like the simple approach I use. Just install VirtualBox on your PC and test.

I see things about converting VirtualBox to VWware.... but never needed it.

Virtual Box works...out of the box!

 

https://www.howtogeek.com/125640/how-to-convert-virtual-machines-between-virtualbox-and-vmware/

 

 

Not sure what you mean? Debian. .as of the OS of the MacIP VM? A virtual Box image on a VM cluster?

 

root@macipgw-vm:~# lsb_release -a
No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID: Ubuntu
Description:    Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS
Release:        16.04
Codename:       xenial

 

 

 

This is how NAT works on the MacIP VM

 

root@macipgw-vm:~# cat /etc/iptables-save
# NAT ROULES FOR MACIPGW. Now active on the MacIPgw VM Ubuntu 16.04 Linux
# Generated by iptables-save v1.4.21 on Sun Feb 28 12:12:33 2016
*nat
:PREROUTING ACCEPT [5981:1556955]
:INPUT ACCEPT [265:46075]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [314:23800]
:POSTROUTING ACCEPT [5:280]
-A PREROUTING -s 192.168.60.0/24 -i tun0
-A POSTROUTING -o enp0s3 -j MASQUERADE
COMMIT
# Completed on Sun Feb 28 12:12:33 2016
# Generated by iptables-save v1.4.21 on Sun Feb 28 12:12:33 2016
*filter
:INPUT ACCEPT [139:13510]
:FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [75:6546]
-A INPUT -s 192.168.60.0/24 -p tcp -m tcp --dport 23 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 23 -j REJECT --reject-with icmp-port-unreachable
COMMIT
# Completed on Sun Feb 28 12:12:33 2016

 

Edited by mactjaap

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Ah, thank you. Sorry for throwing you off about the Debian mention, cat /etc/os-release had Debian info, and I wasn't aware that Ubuntu didn't change that. I just needed to change the enp0s3 reference (the VirtualBox's network interface) to the one that my VM had, which happened to be ens160.

 

I'm using ESXi because I run a homelab based off of it 24/7, and didn't want to spin up VirtualBox just to host your VM. Thank you for your help.

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On 2/14/2019 at 11:36 AM, Gorgonops said:

A standard CUPS installation on most modern Linux-i supports automatic translation of Postscript jobs (regardless of the native language of your physical printer; Postscript has been the de-facto language output by WYSIWYG UNIX programs for decades.). Assuming that's working on your CUPS installation you should be able to use the regular LaserWriter/Laserwriter Plus drivers.

It's been ages since I last set up NetaTalk printing but I don't recall it being particularly difficult. Just make sure that your basic CUPS infrastructure is working and autofiltering Postscript *before* you get started so you're only troubleshooting one thing at once.

Note also that strictly speaking if you're running System 7-something or later you can share directly to an LPR/LPD TCP printer without bothering with Appletalk. Here's a rundown on how to create a "Desktop Printer" pointing to LPR using a utility included in one of the Apple Laserwriter driver updates:

http://main.system7today.com/articles/tutorials/osxprintsharing.html

 

The article focuses on System 7.6.1, but I know I've done this from 7.5.5, at least.

 

Gorgonops,

This is good stuff.  I can confirm that I can now print using the default Laserwriter 8 driver included with System 7.5.3.  I've found out that lpr isn't included with the standard 'cups' package.  I tried installing the package 'lpr', but it didn't work for me.  I found it was better to install the 'cups-bsd' package which includes lpr.  This is what finally worked.  You are also correct that you should make sure you can print via lpr before doing any appletalk configuration.

 

Also, in my searching, I stumbled across this gem of a conversation you had previously.  I seriously laughed out loud at this.  This was hilarious.  Funny stuff!  :lol:

 

On 2/18/2019 at 1:47 PM, mactjaap said:

The MacIPpi solutions are mostly used for bridging TCP/IP over AppleTalk. But it becomes more and more a swiss pocket knive for networking with old Macintosh.

So adding samba, PPP and even printing, etc. could be nice goal for future versions. I never ever printed form old Macintosh to modern printers, so it is a little bit off my confprt zone. But I will test.

 

Incorporating printing universally may be a challenge because everyone will have a different printer.  I'm too much of a linux noob to begin how know how to tackle this.  That being said, I was able to install my specific networked HP printer using the 'hp-setup -i' command.  As stated above, I made sure I could print via lpr before configuring appletalk for printing.  I used the following guide to configure appletalk.  I can now print from my from my Classic II using the Laserwriter 8 print driver included with the default install with System 7.5.3.

 

 

 

 

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I installed the  newest macip software on my orange pi and I can see the macip drive, but there is no software on it. I read that there should be some old internet software on it. I can copy and read to and from the drive. Was the software removed in the newest image?

 

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49 minutes ago, dochilli said:

I installed the  newest macip software on my orange pi and I can see the macip drive, but there is no software on it. I read that there should be some old internet software on it. I can copy and read to and from the drive. Was the software removed in the newest image?

 

I'm always very happy to know people are using this solution! Thanks for letting me know!

 

Correct. No software. You should do it on your own. http://macintoshgarden.org/ is a good starting point. I added it on the site! Thanks for telling me. I changed it on the site: 

 

Quote

You can find all the software you need on: http://macintoshgarden.org

 

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My macip pi works great now. I use an Asante local talk bridge to connect my SE/30 and can surf in the internet. Very nice solution and great work done by mactjaap. I use macweb 2.0 and can connect to some older websites and download software.

 

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