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OCCUPATION

Found 8 results

  1. I'm in the planning process to recap the SONY PSU housed inside my Apple HD20SC external hard drive enclosure. (I might make a video.) I've got a Mouser cart filled with mostly Organic Polymer Aluminum Electrolytic capacitors for that PSU (see below), which have very low ESR down to between 12mΩ and 43mΩ. There are many benefits to low ESR capacitors, and the life rating on them is very high compared to regular aluminum electrolytics. But my concern is that the output of some switch-mode (switching) power supplies can ring if the ESR of the output capacitance is too low (as per the data sheets of many switch mode controllers), so do any of you have a schematic? If not, have any of you used a large number of Organic Polymer capacitors in your vintage Mac PSU recap jobs with success? (I'm asking about power supplies here. Non-PSU applications don't matter much. Mostly those cases are a decoupling/bypass caps which hold up the voltage in times of voltage dips, and those caps benefit from very low ESR.) Here's my Mouser list of mostly polymer caps: C226: 22uF 35V, D=5.2mm -- (Mouser: A759BQ226M1HAAE075) C202: 47uF 25V, D=5.2mm -- (Mouser: A750EK476M1EAAE040) C222: 47uF 25V, D=5.2mm -- (same as C202, so get 2pcs) C109: 150uF 400V, H=32mm, D=25.8mm -- (Mouser: 860021383023) C110: 4.7uF 350V H=32mm, D=12.8mm -- (Mouser: UPM2G4R7MHD) C210: 330uF 16V, D=8.1mm -- (Mouser: RL81C331MDN1KX) C215: 470uF 10V, D=8.1mm -- (Mouser: RNE1C471MDN1) C213: 22uF 100V, D=10.2mm -- (Mouser: A759MS226M2AAAE045) C124: 2200uF 10V, D=12.7mm -- (Mouser: UHE1C222MHD) C209: 2200uF 16V, D=12.7mm -- (just buy the same as C124, so get 2pcs) CR-35 daughter card: C181: 100uF 10V, D=8.1mm, H=13.5mm -- (Mouser: RNS1A101MDN1KX) C182: 100uF 10V, D=8.1mm, H=13.5mm -- (same as C181, so get 2pcs)
  2. After a diskette completely jammed in the floppy drive, I was forced to pry it out with pliers. Unfortunately, such a procedure is far from delicate, and the top drive head was damaged and put out of place. (Actually, I managed to damage the head before even attempting the pliers; they were simply a last resort..) Attached are photos of its current state. Shoulda-woulda-coulda, the deed is done; is it repairable, or is it time for a replacement? I should say, the drive was never ejecting properly in the first place, even after cleaning and relubricating, as well as replacing the drive motor gear. I would get the disk inserting and ejecting seemingly fine when out of the machine, but the moment I fastened it in its bracket and installed in the Mac, the drive would never eject on its own without helping it with tweezers or similar. Then it just jammed up. :\ Thank you!
  3. I finally finished my video on recapping the SONY CR-44 PSU, which can be used in the SE and SE/30. The video is long but informative. A Mouser Cart is linked in the text description under the video (you'll have to watch it on YouTube to see that), for those of you wanting to easily purchase all the electrolytic capacitors required. You also find a link in that description to my SEASONIC PSU replacement video, for those of you who haven't seen that one either. There's still reason to recap the SONY PSU though -- it's fanless and dead silent when operating. If you have only 1 PDS card and no major upgrades, the SONY PSU, once recapped, is more than adequate. Enjoy.
  4. powermax

    Sony Superdrive stopped working

    Hello crews, yesterday I turned on my Power Mac 6100 and noticed that the floppy drive has suddenly stopped working. Last month, it was fully functional - I could read, write and format floppies just fine. I've disassembled the computer, reseat the cables and checked for the presence of all required voltages (+5V, +12V and -12V). Anything looks good. The drive in question is Sony MP-F75W-12G (Apple-Nr. MFD-75W-01G). When I insert a disk the disk motor spins on for 2 seconds. Then it stops and nothing more happens. Any ideas on what the cause for this failure could be? Is there any documentation on how to disassemble, clean and repair this drive? Thanks in advance! Cheers Max
  5. joethezombie

    SE/30 Sony Power Supply, Recapped

    From the album: Macintosh SE/30

    SE/30 Sony power supply after a full recap. Here's the cap list from DigiKey. It will not work for the Astec version. A couple of notes: 1. The "big guy" capacitor (620uF, 400V) is no longer made. The one in the list has a slightly higher capacitance at 680uF. The protection circuit (limiter) in the power supply can easily handle the negligible jump up to 680uF. Something very important, however: the legs on the replacement capacitor are not going to match the slits in the power supply board. I had to widen and lengthen the corners of the existing slits for the new capacitor to fit. I used a Dremel with a small abrasive bit to do this. I thought I'd taken a picture of the result, but apparently I was too excited to get the supply up and going and neglected to snap one! So, this is a picture of the completed board, so you can see the size difference and position of the capacitors. Very happy with this recap.
  6. joethezombie

    SE/30 Power Supply Re-Cap, bottom

    From the album: Macintosh SE/30

    Solder-side view of the Sony power supply. Contacts cleaned and ready for new capacitors.
  7. joethezombie

    SE/30 Power Supply Re-Cap

    From the album: Macintosh SE/30

    All capacitors have been removed from the Sony power supply and is now ready for the replacements to be installed. Copious amounts of electrolytic fluid has been cleansed from the board.
  8. I recently acquired a working, but neglected Quadra 840AV. It came with 3 hard drives installed, an original CD-ROM drive, and with a 64 MB of RAM. It clearly needed a total recap of a motherboard and a good cleanup, which I did. Then I tested the machine, and I found out that a CD-ROM drive wasn't detected, even that it was connected properly. I figured out that it must be the drive that failed. Then I cracked open the Sony CDU561-25 drive, and to my surprise, I found capacitors that have leaked and corroded the PCB. The damage was quite bad, but fixable. There was a group that leaked, and they were three 16V 47uF and two 16V 10uF silver electrolytic SMDs. On the left side of the PCB, there were four 6.3V 100uF that looked okay, but when I changed them, they were certainly on their way to fail (fishy smell). So when I replaced them all with tantalums, the CD-ROM drive now works flawlessly, and I know that they won't leak ever again. Also, I was impressed with the build quality of this particular drive, it is massive and it has a voice coil laser mechanism, which just screams high quality all around. So, next time your CD-ROM drive fails, check the caps inside the unit. Also, if you have a Sony CDU561-25 or similar, it will be the smart idea to change the caps just to be sure, even if they are not leaking. Sometimes the CD-ROM unit will cost alone more than a complete computer, so it is worth it.
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