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Found 7 results

  1. LocalTalk

    Hi Guys, I’m just about to get my 2nd vintage mac up and running, a performa 6200 (i know not the best of macs) but i wanted something newer and cheaper than my SE/30 as a partner machine to get online and share/transfer programs between the machines. Now my thinking was to use AppleTalk/LocalTalk networking in 7.5.5 as it is inbuilt I believe, 1.) is this straight forward to do, do i just plug a LocalTalk cable from one machine to another or do i need some node or switch or something? 2.) i have a v32 14.4k dial up modem i can use on either SE/30 or Performa but thought it would be best to use it on the Performa as an internet gateway for the 2 machines, is this possible? I know it would be slow but ultimately my goal is only to use dial up to be able to get the drivers i need for my 2 NETWORK cards (in both SE/30 & Performa) plus drivers for my external scsi CD-ROM and ZIP drives. If i can do all the above i will then network them all together using TCP/IP to a 2007 Mac mini so i can at least use that as the gateway to my home broadband connection to my vintage mac network. any help i’d be so grateful as i cant get any software on to my vintage machines otherwise
  2. Since my SE/30 Wi-Fi Mod was somewhat successful, I decided to apply a similar technique to my Colour Classic (I’m not a total Mac hoarder, I only have these two!). Here’s the result: (my Colour Classic is a Mystic with a 575 logic board, but this technique should also work on a stock Colour Classic) If you’ve got an SE/30 with a network card, then you’ll know that it is in fact 2 cards connected by a ribbon cable – this made my original Wi-Fi conversion easy as I could just re-arrange things inside the case. However, network cards in the Colour Classic butt against the case, so you’re restricted if you want to attach a Wi-Fi antenna. One solution would be to modify the network card itself – i.e. de-solder the RJ45 jack and replace it with an antenna. However, to me it seemed a travesty to butcher a vintage expansion card. Instead I came up with a non-destructive solution which involved mounting the antenna in the RJ45 port itself: Voila! The idea here is that the Ethernet connection feeds into the mac via a thin cable – and then the Wi-Fi signal feeds back out to the antenna (genius, I know...). I found these thin Ethernet cables on eBay, so I ordered a 1-metre one for just a few dollars: I stripped the wires off one end, and then I removed the plastic from the middle of an RJ45 jack using my Dremel: I crimped the cable back into the jack – but this time feeding the cable downward instead of outward. Then using some Epoxy Putty, I placed the antenna mount inside the jack. You need to work quickly as the epoxy putty sets like a rock in just a few minutes: With some fine sandpaper and a lot of patience, I got it looking pretty clean. A lick of paint: Now for the other end of the cable! The Vonets Wi-Fi card comes with some extra little bits for making your own connection: There are 6 pins on the Wi-Fi module for you to use: I soldered the 4 TX and RX wires from the ethernet cable onto the correct pins. The remaining 2 pins are for 5v power and Ground, so I soldered on another wire for the power. Here’s the finished assembly: I piggy-backed the Wi-Fi module onto the ethernet card using a 15mm M3 screw, nut & spacer: The final problem to solve was how to get power to the Wi-Fi card. I could use the same trick as my SE/30 project, whereby I pulled the power from the Molex drive cable using a splitter – however one nice thing about the Colour Classic is that you can easily slide the motherboard in and out via a single connector, I didn’t want to lose that. I noticed that the LC PDS slot on the motherboard was a bit longer than what the network card required. After a bit of research it turns out that there are 2 LC PDS connectors – a 96-pin connection and a 114-pin connection. I found the pinouts for the LC PDS slot on the Interwebs and lo-and-behold there is a free 5v+ and ground connection in the unused holes. I marked them using a Sharpie: Here’s the ethernet card and Wi-Fi module fully connected: With bated breath, I powered on the Mac expecting fireworks – but everything worked perfectly! The link light came on the Ethernet card, and you can see inside from the blue lights that the Wi-Fi card has power! Obligatory IP address screenshot Here’s my 2 Macs with their Wi-Fi Antennae
  3. I’ve had an idea for a while to add Wi-Fi to my Classic Mac. I finally got around to putting it together and I think it turned out really well! I thought I’d post my experiences here for anybody interested. There was no hope of me building a PDS Wi-Fi card from scratch - but I already had a DaynaPort E/SI30 Ethernet card so I thought that I might be able to attach a Wi-Fi Bridge to the existing card via the RJ45 port. My first thought was an Arduino Yun board, which has both an Ethernet port and Wi-Fi built in – but they’re expensive, and to me it seemed overkill to use an entire Arduino/Linux solution for this. Instead, I found this Vonets VM300 Wi-Fi Module on eBay for $25 from China! At that price, I thought it was worth trying: Avocado for scale as I was out of bananas – it’s tiny! It might look daunting, but it’s very easy to set up – you plug in the Ethernet cable and connect to your Wi-Fi network via it’s inbuilt web interface: I did the initial setup on my Laptop and I was connected to my Wi-Fi network in no time. But when I tried connecting the module to my Mac, it just wouldn’t connect - all I got was a blinking link light: After a bit of web searching it became apparent that this is a common problem: modern Ethernet devices use auto-negotiate to detect the speed & duplex of the connection. The old Mac network cards pre-date this standard, so the router doesn’t detect the connection. The only way to correct the issue is to disable auto-negotiate on the router and explicitly set the connection to 10mbs / half-duplex. The issue is that virtually all modern routers don’t allow you to do this, and a first glance the Vonets VM300 was no exception - I couldn’t find any options to manually set the connection type. I thought all was lost and I’d just wasted $25… until I found the “Upgrade Firmware” button – and BOOM a new drop-down menu appeared! The instant I changed to 10mbs / half-duplex, the link light on the Mac went solid! A huge thanks to Vonets for adding this feature as obviously it’s a very niche requirement. My Mac was on the Wi-Fi! Now I just need to mount the Wi-Fi card inside my Mac to make things nice and clean. I bought a small sheet of aluminium from my local hobby shop, and I designed a basic template to cut it to size – I’ve attached the PDF template to this post. Cutting the aluminium was easy, just glue on the template and score the edges with a utility knife: Then clamp the aluminium to keep it flat, then bend the other side back and forth a few times until it snaps off cleanly. Next, I drilled some holes and bent the aluminium into a 90-degree bracket: I bought some 5mm spacers, 15mm M3 screws, bolts & washers from my local Jaycar Electronics (for the Aussies out there), and started assembling everything: Looks good and very sturdy! I then mounted the completed assembly into the Mac: I noticed that the Ethernet cable was precariously close to the CRT board, so I ended up angling up the bracket a few more degrees which worked a treat. The final problem to solve was power to the Wi-Fi card. The card comes with a USB power cable, which conveniently connects via an InLine DC connector (5V) – so I decided to build a replacement cable that would work in the Mac. I already have a SCSI2SD V6 card in my mac, which uses a 4-pin Mini-Molex connector for power - so I found this cable on eBay: Now I can power both the SCSI2SD and the Wi-Fi card. Funny story: I ordered this part on eBay and literally 15 minutes later my doorbell rang and a guy handed the part to me – weird! Molex connectors have both a 5v and 12v line in them, so I was very careful to only wire up the 5v line as otherwise my board would be fried. This was my finished cable: A soldering iron was required, and I insulated the 4-pin connector with a bit of hot glue. If you’re in Australia, the Jaycar part numbers are HM3414 for the 4-pin Mini-Molex, and PS0526 for the DC connector (it took me forever to find these!) I plugged everything in and powered up the Mac – the Link Light came on solid on the DaynaPort card, and the blue lights came on the Wi-Fi card – a quick check in the Open Transport control panel showed that I was on the network – success! I put the case back on, and I now have a Wi-Fi Mac. It works incredibly well – as soon as the machine boots up, it connects via DHCP to our home router and it’s on the network straight away Next Steps I’m a Software Dev, so I’m keen to write a System Extension to display a Wi-Fi icon in the menu bar to manage the connections – just like you would on a modern Mac. I believe that you can communicate with the Vonets module via Telnet to manage the Wi-Fi networks. I’m new to Classic Mac programming though (not a lot of demand haha) – so it will take me a while to brush up on my C skills!
  4. LC 475 Questions

    To All: Hi, I'm Gerry. I'm new here because I come from the Apple II world. I belong (for some 30 years) to the still active OAC (Original Apple Corps) Users Group here in Santa Monica Ca. With much of the group we discuss Macs since that's what people want help with but we also talk about Apple IIs and PCs. I have a couple of Apple IIgs-es, and recently an Apple IIe card for the classic LC series Mac. I bought an LC 475 and added 128 MBs of system RAM and upped the display RAM to 1 MB. So far everything works great. Then, in an effort to replace the noisy boot hard drive, I replaced it with a SCSI2SD card and a 32 GB miniSD card. After a lot of head-scratching and trying to figure out which version of HD SC setup to use (as it turned out Drive Setup 1.5 worked best) I divided the SD card into 4 SCSI drives (0-3) and partitioned drive 0 for 6 partitions, 4-2GB HFS (for compatibility) and 2-32 MB ProDOS partitions along with the other three drives having 2-4 GB HFS hard drive partitions. So there are 12 drives on the desktop. While trying to install System 7.5.3 on the first HD, I had a lot of freezing and crashing issues and had to repair the partitions using Disk First Aid. After completing the install and upgrading to 7.5.5, the system works well except when I copy files from virtual one drive partition to another (for backup), I still get periodic freezing/crashing. Finally, in an effort to get the LC 475 talking to other computers, I purchased an AsanteTalk bridge and got the LC 475 and my iMac G3, running 9.2.1, talking using Appletalk over TCP/IP on my network. So, after all my head-banging I have some questions. I have the iMac on my my network but it doesn't work well accessing the internet due to the age of the included browsers. I also have a late 2008 Mac Pro on the network running OS X 10.11.6 (no more system OS upgrades). I'd like for the LC 475 to access shared files on the Mac Pro so I can easily transfer software images but I can't get file sharing working, even between the iMac G3 and the Mac Pro. So my first question is there any way to share files between the LC 475 or the iMac G3 with the Mac Pro? My research so far says no but hopefully someone will have a suggestion. BTW, I can ping the iMac G3 from the Mac Pro but not the LC 475. Second, Since I have 132 MBs of RAM in the LC 475, System 7.5.5 swallows it all up except for around 3.2 MBs according to the Finder. If I pull out the 128 MB SIMM and reboot, the LC 475 reboots and along with 12 MBs of Virtual Memory, boots fine with again about 3.2 MBs of memory available according to the Finder. How do I limit how much RAM System 7.5.5 swallows up so I can run as many applications as I want? I've searched but, so far, I've seen no comments on 7.5.5 being a memory hog or how to control it. Thank you for any insights you have. Gerry
  5. Three networking card options are readily available to add ethernet to Color Classic via PDS: Farallon Ethermac LC AsanteLite LC Apple Ethernet Twisted Pair LC What I can't seem figure out is which of the three is best and most reliable, not to mention multi system version compatible. Anyone have any advice? I am going to use it on a LC550 upgraded CC.
  6. Divide by zero error

    Does anyone have any idea why my Classic might throw a "Divide by zero" error?, when I try and connect to an iMac G3.Its the classic Mac bomb screen and even if you try and restart it gives the same error. Both machines are connected to a switch, and the Classic has a Dayna SCSI/Ethernet box. The iMac G3 has the Networking CP set to Ethernet and the Classic has the same thing set to Alt Ethernet from a choice of three, the other two do nothing apparently. Both machines have sharing set to on. Louis
  7. OK, so I'm stumped on this one. I've tried to look all over here as well as everywhere Bing and Google would show me and they were not taking me to where I needed to go. I have an Apple EtherTalk NB Card running in my 8MB RAM, 80MB HD, 32KB cache card Macintosh IIci and it wants to connect to the network. It can't get a link. It's running System 6.0.8 with Network Software Installer 1.4.5 installed, and MacTCP 2.0.6. I have to give the Comcast DNS servers rather than making the wireless router the DNS server like Open Transport on Mac OS 8.6 and later. I read that sometimes MacTCP needs different defaults than Open Transport, and so I put the Comcast DNS servers in rather than letting it use my AirPort Base Station as a DNS server the way you can with Open Transport. The current networking hardware setup is a 802.11b AirPort Snow/Dual Ethernet UFO base station along with a 10/100Base-TX Ethernet switch I occasionally use that both of them features System 6 obfuscating features such as auto-negotiation as regards duplex, auto-sensing as regards whether it's 10baseT or 100Base-TX, full duplex (because all other Macs on my network support operation that is supposedly a toxic trio for a System 6 Mac with a 1989 vintage Ethernet card that just barely supports AppleTalk Phase 2.) What happens when I have it hooked up using the best available connection system is that the IIci properly initializes the card and goes ahead and sets MacTCP to connect via Ethernet, and AppleTalk to connect via EtherTalk the way it says you should do under the article about Classic Mac Networking. If I change the settings software or hardware-wise from what I read should work (and does work as much as possible) for my situation, I get the famous error that "There was an error starting your AppleTalk connection. The built-in LocalTalk port will be used instead." According to years of research, if it doesn't say that message, that means your settings are correct for the network you want to use. But since the network is auto-negotiating, auto-sensing, and full duplex (because all my other devices support those three items), the IIci can't light up the link signal on the transceiver. At least that's what I am theorizing. If the transceiver wasn't compatible with the card, then it would fail to get EtherTalk going according to everything I've read. But yet with those three advanced features on the router end, that combination is what to me seemingly not allowing it to establish a connection. It even works well enough that if you disconnect the Ethernet cord, it knows it's been disconnected and you have to zap the PRAM in order to get the IIci to not display the expected error message until you fiddle with it again (i.e by moving it to a different port, such as a port on the external 4-port 10/100Base-TX switch or on a different router.) If I'm barking up the wrong tree here, then I want to know why it seems to work in all areas except getting a link (and of course, through the link that it wants to have but does not, being able to work with my other computers and the Internet.)
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