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Cory5412

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Everything posted by Cory5412

  1. Cory5412

    SCSI to IDE Adapter

    That would be a great addition to the wiki. (unrelatedly: I have the test wiki files, I just need to get them on a more reliable server and configure email so people can sign up for accounts.) EDIT (adding) Missed this. Yeah, that could be interesting. To be honest, the CF AztecMonster and PowerMonster ended their life, by memory, at more than what a SCSI2SD v6 costs, and while they are technically more performant, it's not, if I remember correctly, by all that much. We've got a couple different people in the community who are proficient with Japanese, but I think there's a reason Artmix has discontinued all their CF products and replaced them with SCSI2SD clones. The thing to remember about this particular performance band is that at the upper and of it you have Macs that are (I know i've said this like 7 times) better served by PCI SATA cards, which were manufactured in fairly plentiful bulk, and that can in some cases benefit from going faster. PCI IDE cards also exist, but it would be my fourth choice for a machine from that era, after SATA, upgraded USCSI disk, and SCSI2SD. Then IDE card, then stock disk. (Except stock disk ends up being first choice and in most of my Macs I use them until they kick it.) At the low end, the SCSI2SD v5 both works well and is performant enough for the needs of 68k Macs, so really you're talking about power user '040s and PowerPCs where the v6 or other faster/bigger options are relevant. The CF PowerMonster ended its run at $109, which isn't that much more expensive than the SCSI2SD v6, but there's no gaurantee it would start at that same price if Artmix were to start building it again. If you want to coordinate asking someone to do this, the things I'd consider doing are either setting up a group buy, asking to license or have the design so you can have them built (or so we can have @inertialcomputing build them) or asking what it would cost to buy a large amount of them up front to resell. (Or: what it would cost for them to make a certain number to sell to us directly, but honestly it might be easier to just broker a single bulk order and then resell, and that would be less risk to them as a manufacturer.)
  2. Cory5412

    SCSI to IDE Adapter

    Just to be clear here, that is already the case on PCI PowerMacs, and as has been noted, is also already the case on IDE-having Macs. There's no good reason not to put a SATA card in a PTP unless you already have a UWSCSI card in there for some non-storage task and want to use it for both. SCSI to SATA would be a huge benefit though, in the range of '040 desktops and 601/NuBus PowerPC desktops, which can't run a SIL3112 but can in theory address up to 2TB volumes and use HFS+ for data partitions. The other thing here is it's tough to say whether a new, hobbyist-led/designed SATA/SCSI converter would result in "nonsense" or not. At the very least, it seems like there's a handful of use cases that need to be considered. (50/68/SCA, and 2.5-inch.) Does the PTP have a second SCSI bus in it? If so, you might try putting the SCSI2SD on that bus instead, just to see if that'll help things along. The v6 is a more difficult beast to tame than the v5 family. Last year, a friend and I were doing some benchmarks, me on an 8600 after he helped me update the firmware, and then he got better results himself after updating the firmware. I think I need to pull out the 8600 because now I'm wondering about whether anything can be done about some of the software stability issues the scsi2sd can bring about with faster Macs. In reality though, your PTP and my 8600 would benefit from SATA card installations. (I have a couple on hand at the moment, destined for vtools, I might pop one in for a bit just for fun.) I happen to be using the v6 because I had one laying around and wanted to test it, but it's far from the best possible choice for that group of machines. I'll probably move it to a NuBus machine like my 6100 or Power120, where SATA doesn't exist as an option unless I splash a few hundo down on an existing acard scsi/sata adapter. The CF adapters are good. I need to go look again, the SD adapter was a SCSI2SD 4 or 5 clone last time I looked, if they've got something different then that's worth looking at. The CF adapters were faster than the SCSI2SD, but you pay dearly for the speed and operational simplicity. The SCSI2SD is arguably one of the more successful mac-led vintage hardware projects and that you can buy the v5.1 for $60 a pop is really impressive for this kind of thing. The other thing here is that looking at Artmix's site right now, it appears they've shifted gears entirely into manufacturing SCSI2SD clones under different names, I don't see any CF hardware on their site. If that's the direction even artmix has gone, then I think the issue here is documentation and troubleshooting and not with the scsi2sd itself, given that this vendor is using it to replace their own previous higher performance product.
  3. Cory5412

    SCSI to IDE Adapter

    Idly: I put a v6 in my 8600 and all my issues cleared up when I used a SCSI cable that came with the system, made sure the device was not sitting on any case metal (I painter-taped it to either a big index card or an antistatic bag) and then used silverlining to initialize it with its stock settings. TBH, depending on what kind of build your PTP is, you may consider a SATA Card or a newer/bigger server SCSI hdd. (Though: those server SCSI HDDs are not really a long-term sustainable solution, given that the enthusiast RISC UNIX community still needs them and doesn't yet universally have something to replace/augment storage in their machines. Some of those machines can run SAS cards but not all of them.)
  4. Cory5412

    SCSI to IDE Adapter

    I'm sorry for the confusion. That's not what I suggested. My suggestion was that a SCSI to SATA adapter would be a better idea to build. (EDIT: I'm aware that these exist - my suggestion here is to either clone that design, find a source of them, or design a new one, ideally one with SCSI connections typically used on Macs in tow. Perhaps a board that mounts in a Mac's motherboard SCSI connector and just has a bunch of SATA ports coming out, pre-assigned to each ID, or a db25 external device that spits out eSATA or, IDK, USB so you can just use an off-the-shelf external hard disk, or has a cable going to an external enclosure where SATA disks(s) can be mounted.) The other option might be to clone or replicate, or request another run of one of the SCSI to CF adapters. IDE disks that are "size-appropriate" for anything pre-SCSI 4.3 (030s) are going to be in hot demand from all the other vintage communities that can use them, and newer more reliable IDE hard disks are in the same range as extremely cheap SATA SSDs and low end 2.5-inch laptop hard disks. A CF adapter (or, well, I mean, an SD one) would let you use more reliable media without seek time issues. IDE to SATA does exist, but most of the systems where it's most relevant can also run SIL3112 SATA cards, I tend to believe that things should be "easy" to the extent possible, and perhaps a version of this solution is, as I suggested above, a SCSI2SD pre-configured to just pass the entire SD card through as one disk, and then you partition it in the OS you're using as is appropriate, even if that means 7.1 on '030-or-earlier hardware will only get to use ~2GB of data. (Which is still kind of a lot in all reality.) In my experience, the SCSI2SD does require some configuration, and I think we're as a community making it harder on ourselves by, to be blunt here, not documenting well, in the wiki, what works and how you do things. I suspect that's part of why there's a dozen or so unique web sites with "here's how I did mine". At the very least, an aggregator for those tutorials would be a good start. I know I've said this, but I'm going to say it again: IDE isn't it, in this case. IDE disks aren't being made any more, and I'm not even sure that IDE to SATA adapters are, and to be honest, double bridging SCSI -> IDE -> SATA seems altogether like a bad idea in action. SCSI directly to either some kind of memory card format or to SATA is, I'll argue, the way forward here.
  5. Cory5412

    SCSI to IDE Adapter

    It would be super interesting to see a new storage option like this come into existence! I know this is not what was asked, but: As an idea/recommendation: It might be worth thinking about adapting directly to SATA, as SATA drives are still being built and just sort of era and timeline wise there are more of them. SCSI Manager 4.3 68ks should be able to address up to 2TB disks, and SATA CD/DVD-ROM drives are still being built and in my experience even ~decade-old SATA optical drives are way better at reading old and failing optical media than what's in old Macs. Being able to use those disks directly on a vintage Mac would be hugely advantage, since it's generally pretty easy to give someone an ISO or a bincue they can burn that has a lot of needed tools on it, compared to floppy images. I know this also wasn't asked, but: I'm kind of curious as to what's going on with the SCSI2SD for you. If there's another thread, we should probably take this discussion there, but largely I see SCSI2SD as a more sustainable forward movement for these machines than something like build new adapters for disks that haven't been manufactured in over ten years and are themselves dying off of old age. Another question that might be worth asking generally is whether or not it's possible to make the SCSI2SD easier, perhaps by having "easy mode firmware" be an option, where the device just presents the entire SD card to the Mac, rather than the options the SCSI2SD 5 series and 6 present today, which are fairly comprehensive, but there's also a lot of nerd knobs a lot of people don't need or want. Perhaps we can ask Inertialcomputing whether that's even remotely possible, maybe as a variant. of the shipping product. (The main argument against doing that is that SCSI Manager 4.3 and 7.6.1 or better are realistically needed to make good use of volumes over 4GB, which means that the target machines would end up just being SCSI '040s and 601 PowerPCs. Older machines would get benefit out of the SCSI2SD's ability to present separate devices and LUNs or emulate a specific disk and newer ones would get more out of a v6, a PCI SATA card, or a faster-than-stock SCSI disk.)
  6. [mod note] moved to ppc powerbook/ibook.
  7. Is MacGarden available by FTP? That would be nice, I hadn't realized that. 7.5.5 with opentransport and the right updates can also connect to vtools right in the finder. (vtools also has FPT which should allow make older OSes and non-OT or un-updated 7.5/7.6 setups to work.)
  8. Cory5412

    Which Model SCSI2SD should I get?

    Seconding what Crutch said: a 6 is way overkill for a compact mac. If you want to swap the scsi2sd between your systems, the v5.5 should be fine. The biggest gotcha with any of them and the Plus is that the Plus doesn't supply termination power, so you'll need a phone/tablet charger and a Micro USB cable to power the device on the Plus.
  9. Cory5412

    Nabbed a 6500/300 with a few differences

    Very nice find! My personal theory is that it's not a prototype at all, but rather that the case is just missing the badge -- it looks normal otherwise. The FCC label is probably because of the european modem or TV/FM tuners, which Apple likely wouldn't have submitted for approval in the US. If anything in here is "prototype" hardware, it would only have been the new components to this model. The 6500/275 and /300 are the last of a few different 6500 models, and the 6400/6500 shared a lot, so they wouldn't have need to re-prototype, say, the CD drive (if it was a model already used in a shipping 6400/6500 config) or the case and the audio system. Re the creative studio loadout: The 6400 shipped in the USA as the "VEE" and that's a very similar loadout, I think we got the creative studio edition in the USA, but I don't know if the /300 shipped that way or only either the /250 or the /275. The /300 was available as a small business loadout and a general "fast 6500" config (with like 48 megs of RAM, a 6-gig hard disk, 24x CD and Zip), if I'm remembering correctly. (The service source manual lists the US configs, and I've seen one or two other documents with info about them.)
  10. Cory5412

    Solid State Drive for G3?

    Fair enough! The main advantage to older Windows Server or Linux+Netatalk in this scenario would be if you need a really enormous amount of network-connected storage accessible to older Macs, and didn't want to deal with it being on different disks or partitions. ASIP stands for AppleShare IP (my apologies for the uncommon abbreviation), which is Apple's server product for Mac OS 9. The main reason to use it is if you need email/web or if you need file server for more than ten years. With under ten, and without needing those other services, I'd say just stick to regular Mac OS 9 file sharing.
  11. Generally seconding ASIP5-6 if you're looking for functionality in particular. Let me know if you want my write-up on setting up ASIP, which isn't yet done, but, I need to be working on it more. (EDIT: To clarify, the write-up is "how to run vtools" but would be applicable to anybody who wanted to use ASIP 6 (should apply to 5, more or less) for collaborative or workplace scenarios or was just interested in what that would be like.)
  12. Cory5412

    Solid State Drive for G3?

    That may end up being the best idea. In that scenario, you only really have to make one partition, somewhere under around 200 gigs to boot from, and all the other partitions can be up to the maximum supported volume size for OS9, which is 2TB. I recommend using HFS+ if you do that. How many people would need to connect to the system? If you're interested, I can work on and then share/post my guide to ASIP6. Depending on your interest and needs, linux + netatalk or Windows Server 2003 may also work.
  13. Cory5412

    Wiki/Pages article ideas

    Of late, I've come across two things that would make great wiki pages. This thread is mostly for me to keep track of those things to either ultimately write them or ask for them to be written. Right now, the wiki is in "OK but not great" shape and the long-term The first is documenting the RAM speeds in Wombat motherboards. In particular: What is the RAM speed on the Quadra 800, Q650, and 25/33MHz C650s. The second is information about booting from USB on PowerPC Macs. In particular, what models can boot from USB, what OSes can they boot, and if necessary what commands are needed. Older, but also relevant: Mac hardware and OS disk limit information and testing. Most of the information is gathered, but it would be nice for it to be a page rather than a post in the middle of a thread. Added 2019-01-26: What Macs can boot OS 9 (stock/default). Added 2019-04-04: IIci/IIsi video output system, support for 640x480@60 or no. I still haven't played with the Pages functionality, but we do have it. Please feel free to add more ideas especially if you see forum threads that should be captured or rewritten as articles or anything that doesn't exist yet but would be good reference information.
  14. Cory5412

    Wiki/Pages article ideas

    classic mac networking: hosts file formatting:
  15. Cory5412

    Upgraded my on 11'' lcd screen

    Gonna mirror that this looks great and I imagine it's a huge productivity booster on this machine.
  16. Cory5412

    Major Score! 8600 with Sonnet CPU, 3DFX card, Etc

    It is, and to be honest, this is unrelated, but I'm thinking of asking my telco to give it to me, for hilarity reasons. I've got a small PBX I can pipe a BRI or a PRI into and get some neat calling functionality with. Anyway, the trouble would be, ISDN might not be something the telco has a lot of capacity for, might require line conditioning (though probably not more than DSL), etc. Depends on what you mean by came along. I've got a VDSL2 line at 40/20 and the telco is telling me up to 140/? is available at my home, and that's before looking at upgrades to g.fast. I don't know if that involves bonding or if it's a single pair. There's a certain area where upgrading to a better DSL technology gives you cheap immediate results ahead of The Real Answer which is to lay fiber directly to homes. The physical layout of cable infrastructure makes it easier to just drop newer, higher-bandwidth DOCSIS devices and better responsiveness to simple in-line amplifiers relative to what needs to be done to improve the layout and speeds of a DSL system. (moving to g-fast outside of in-building installations or communities planned up front for it (bad idea) will likely require FITL-style midsized pedestals for every few houses, and by that time you've spent almost as much money installing new equipment and power delivery that you may as well just have dropped fiber in. ISPs who bothered to lay any fiber are enjoying the ability to just replace the endpoint equipment for generational (BPOIN -> GPON -> XGPON) upgrades, but, like, that was never particularly common, unfortunately. (Also: re-factoring split factors isn't typically very difficult.) .... anyway.
  17. Cory5412

    A tale of 3 Tibooks...

    By the way, I feel like the mood in this thread is a little sour. That's definitely mostly my bad, and I apologize. I absolutely don't explicitly intend to blame you for your machine's death. I agree completely that it's "a problem" that a machine with "pro" in the name and sold as a professional product with marketing and imagery designed explicitly to promote its professional usage, and a price tag to match, should probably be able to hold up to that use case. It's very bad that you and everyone you work with managed to get multiple successive bad units and/or repairs that ended up having the same problem. If that were me, I would be at least as angry at that machine as I am at the TiBook, and in another 15 years, nobody should hold it against you for recommending against that machine, even if in the context of 10+ years from now, what happened in 2017 makes no bearing at all. Ironically, that kind of thing is most of why I hated the TiBook, and why after that machine, I never ended up buying another Mac laptop again. (Let's be entirely real: If that Pismo hadn't been so bad or if I hadn't lucked into the single workload that brought the machine to its knees, ironically, it'd seem, without even taxing the CPU that hard, I would probably have bought or asked for a Mac laptop instead of the iMac for school, and would likely even have been less likely to go looking again once Vista launched, which is the start of my becoming almost entirely Windows-based at home, to the extent that I run AD/Exchange/SharePoint on my Hyper-V server). And, this is entirely with the recognition that the people who are buying Macs are doing so for good reason, and I just don't happen to have that reason any more.
  18. Cory5412

    Major Score! 8600 with Sonnet CPU, 3DFX card, Etc

    Very nice looking setup. A couple of LaserWriters were still available in 1997, as well as I think some Stylewriters. The LaserWriter 12/640 and 8500 were the newest laserwriters. The LaserWriter 630, 630 Pro and 16/600PS predate this by a good bit but loads, perhaps even most of the ones sold earlier in the '90s would still have been in service. Those are Canon EX (IIRC) engines, you can think of them as rebadged laserwriter 4s and they take the same cartridges, so it's not unreasonable to keep them running today. At least a few of those have ethernet and can speak TCP/IP as well, so you can use them on modern computers - though they're slow and use a lot of power by modern standards. The StyleWriters Apple ever sold were mostly Canon and HP engines, some going as far to be pretty overtly re-badged HP DeskJets. All of that stuff got discontinued upon or just before the introduction of the PowerMac G3, so you could also reasonably pair this with a Newton, a OneScanner or Color OneScanner and a QuickTake. There's also the quicktime video conferencing camera, which -- purely for interest unless you actually have ISDN or anything that can interface with it -- originally paired with an ISDN telephony add-in card, which would be something really fun to drop in a 7000 or 8000 series machine from this era, at the height of the idea of telecommuting. Also curious: does that microphone you have attached work? It's designed for 68k Macs (outside of the AV Quadras) which used the older microphone connector and there's a good chance it doesn't. The newer large microphone is the "correct" one to use with this machine, if you can find one.
  19. Cory5412

    A tale of 3 Tibooks...

    If you want to read it that way, sure. I can lean into it if you want, for dramatic effect. (Also: I'd forgotten that recall and/or apparently didn't realize it impacted 2016/17 machines as well.) But, largely, if it turns out that, just, any machine subjected to the rigors of that kind of technical and/or multimedia authoring workflow does that, and that happens to be the reason, and not just purely coincidence (i.e. production batches or bad cells from a supplier) then, sure, we can/should absolutely talk about Apple's continued inability to build a machine that can withstand the rigors of professional work. The audience of 15-inch MacBook pro users at the university where I work -- as tech support, so I take calls from the people having these kinds of problems -- is much more diverse compared to the population you described. Many of them are very, very under-using these machines, and many of them are doing things on them that arguably should be going onto the HPC. (Not a Mac, but: we had a faculty repeatedly blow out the cooling on their Latitude E6400 or 6410 doing really long-running analytics jobs in SAS or something similar, for example) (That faculty now has either an HPC account or a special RDP environment that doesn't terminate their jobs, both for speed and reliability.) It's also entirely possible (I'm on a team of 5) that there's loads of these failures at the university, and I just don't happen to have seen any of the tickets, so, like, take all that for what it's worth I suppose. That said: That's a pretty random grouping of machines. If we want to claim it's some kind of design flaw, then it would make more sense if it was, say, all of the older unibody retina machines, or all of the flat-keyboard/type c machines, rather than certain groups from each model. I.e. all machines that share a single particular design, and not just some of the machines from two different designs. Even more interestingly is that the 2013 and 2015 MacBook Pros have the same processor -- the component I singled out as being highly likely to spike power consumption and cause draw from the battery, even when plugged into the wall. The result is ultimately the same: Some of these computers are going to suffer -- badly -- from failed batteries. I suspect that it's not an overarching problem with the macbook pro, however, if none of the 13-inch machines are involved and if the 2012-2014 and 2018+ models aren't involved. To call back to the future collectability aspect that got mentioned: The long-term collecting effect is probably going to be that there'll be a couple fewer 2015-17 machines around. As established elsewhere in the site, the 2013-14 and 15 macbook pros are dang near the same, and the 2016/17 models are quite similar to the 2018/19 models, so it'll be a bummer if by some miracle these are by any measure "difficult to get", but I doubt, to be perfectly honest, that it'll impact total survivor numbers in ten to twenty years that much. Even if it does: interest in "late 2010s era" vintage Macs will need to be proportionally more popular in, say, 2040 than "late 1990s era" vintage Macs is today for it to make a difference. (i.e. if the vintage Mac community doesn't grow at the same rate new Mac buyers has 2000 to 2020, then we'll be swimming in the things.) Basically: I think it'll be fine, and at worst, it's pretty reasonably likely that the 2015-17 machines will run without their batteries, even if they speedstep all the way down and become annoying or useless by today's standards. (Though honestly, at everything except the web I suspect a quad-core 800MHz machine otherwise operating at full modern speed (i.e. SSD and RAM) would be more or less fine to actually use, and it'd certainly stay cool.)
  20. Cory5412

    A tale of 3 Tibooks...

    A generation or two (I believe it was for the 2017 or 2018 models) the MacBook Pro switched from adhesive to screws for some of the internals, so removing the battery has gotten a little better over the past couple years. For 2010/11/12 (or perhaps just 11/12, I'd have to look) the batteries were more or less removable, just not "in transit" swappable as they were up through that point. So generally if you can pull the machine apart, removing the battery isn't the biggest problem. Sourcing a replacement is an issue, and I'm curious as to how the last ~decadeish of MacBooks will run without their batteries. Pre-unibody, the machines would boot and run, but they'd be speedstepped down to the slowest possible speed (around 800MHz typically) largely because burst power usage on a Mac laptop has long been higher than what the power adapters could provide on their own. (Actually, knowing what I do about Intel power draw, I almost wonder if there really is an increased incident of catastrphic battery failure, and not just something weird going on at Gorgonops' office, if it's related to something in the workload these machines are seeing causing a much higher than normal battery cycle/draw rate versus a machine that, say, mostly idles on office applications.) I guess the question is, in 10-15 years, what "surprisingly few" will mean. I feel like the litmus test will kind of end up being how many flat-keyboard era macbook/pros we see hanging around in another ten years, relative to the number of 2008-2012 unibody/not-retina macbook/pros we all still see running around today. If a much smaller percentage of the number of macbooks from the bad/flat keyboard era survive, there'll still be plenty to go around in 2030-2040, because mac laptops are "a bit" more popular in 2020 than they were in 2002. I do suspect most of the survivors will end up being used with external keyboards though. That seems to be the single most inevitable failure. Everything else mostly seems to be luck or perhaps something that happens on the coast but not in the mountains. As far as batteries for vintage machines go: A thing I want to try eventually is getting one of those really huge battery packs with AC outlets on them (for example). I've got a 1400 that's... not great but if I took care, it would be bag-ready, and I would absolutely go hang out in a cafe with it, but getting seating with an outlet isn't a completely reliable possibility. The problem, of course, is that AC-output power banks are huge and you can quickly go from "backpack ready" to "hand truck".
  21. Cory5412

    A tale of 3 Tibooks...

    Incidentally, largely, it almost sounds like the argument is to avoid a laptop from the era at all if you can possibly avoid it. I have literally no recollection about how I got the TiBook now in my posession, and some iBooks (a G3/366 and a G4-12/1.33) were given to me by a local friend, but by and large, I would rather have a desktop machine than a laptop for any number of the reasons you've listed: They're faster, they're more reliable out the gate, they're easier to maintain, it's easier to put modern replacement parts in them (in so many senses), they run OS X even better than a TiBook would, and they're physically more comfortable to use, from an ergonomics perspective. Given that a pismo is now at minimum twenty years old, and the youngest TiBooks are a sprightly seventeen, you're absolutely right, these aren't spring chickens and it might be best not to treat them as if they are. Which is a huge bummer because it basically means that save for the early iBook G3s and any other PowerBooks that happen to have survived, there's not a recommendable, viable on-the-go system 7/8/9 computer. (Ignoring battery issues, although it's not entirely out of the question to find something from this era that claims to still have surprisingly good life. My iBook/366 estimates over 4 hours, something I should test eventually.) That's not to say that bag-ready Mac laptops outright don't exist, just that finding one is essentially random luck.
  22. Cory5412

    A tale of 3 Tibooks...

    Sure, at this piont, you really find what you can get. I say the same thing about LCs and Performas all the time, and I suppose the same applies with late PowerPC laptops, too. Heck, I even have a second 1GHz TiBook that I run some OS9 stuff on, and some of my old-ish photos indicate that for some reason I had not just the one but three in total, so, like, yes, there are more tibooks in existence than pismos. I'm fully aware that my eternal dislike of TiBooks is mostly irrational. I had a bad time because I deigned not to upgrade from a two-year-old professional laptop to a brand new one in 2005 when I got a new peripheral for it, and had a bad time that I didn't know how to diagnose because I was like sixteen and didn't realize that the CPU wasn't the only important part to a computer. I used it anyway because we didn't have the money for a new computer. Later, when the screen broke, I swapped the machine for something still working for what I needed in that moment, which ironically was going to be a laptop as I went to universality. In retrospect, high end chance that was a pity swap, but I appreciated it immensely. It didn't make my photo work better, but the pismo had a screen and it ran OS X well enough. I didn't game and the pismo also had a generous disk and 512mb of ram so my day-to-day was fine on it. I didn't get the TiBook in 2005, I pulled it out of the box new(1) in 2003. 2005 was when I got my DSLR(3). We shouldn't give young cory that hard of a time for having still had a TiBook in 2005. It's well established that literally anything else from Apple's product stack would've been a better choice for me specifically in 2003, but I wasn't aware the machine was coming my way and even though I very very preferred laptops then (and until 2009 at the very least) - a laptop was chosen mostly for physical convenience(2). --- (1) QT2451CEN4M, mine, had been a floor demo at CompUSA, but the model would remain on sale until the 15-inch got brought into the Al fold in September 2003. I believe there was a slight discount for haivng bought it this way, either in the form of AppleCare being included for $0 or around $150 off of the $2800 list price. (2) The backstory there is that we were moving a couple states over, but it's the west and that means ~1500 miles. The four of us lived in a travel trailer a bit smaller than your average city bus (it was 37' long) for around a year. Incidentally, I completely do not buy the story that a PowerBook is better than a Mac mini or PowerMac in space-constrained scenarios, because after moving, we unpacked my mom's minitower computer and LCD dislay, my dad's laptop, my laptop, and we pulled out my iMac/233 and we'd swap between my brother using it and me using both on a small table-for-two inside. We'd stow the iMac on the floor at the back of the trailer between the booth seat and the bunk beds when we needed the table space for something else. If you have room for powerbook and you're worried about connecting it an LCD: you have room for a mini, and you probably have room for a powermac. (3) Yes I'm going out of order. I bought a Kodak DCSPROFESSIONAL and the cheapest possible F-mount lens on ebay and when those things came in, the camera didn't work, so my parents splashed out in a fairly unusual manner for a camera to put on the lens. That one was coordinated a little bit.
  23. Cory5412

    A tale of 3 Tibooks...

    Post TiBook, Apple managed to improve in build quality a lot. I would argue that the TiBook was too ambitious of an early attempt to do something that was pretty clearly possible and reasonable. Though, I'd also argue Apple didn't really get it right until 2008 when the unibody enclosure was introduced. I don't think it's because the TiBook was thin that it was flimsy. ThinkPads from the era are nearly as thin and have almost none of the problems the TiBook did, physically.
  24. Cory5412

    A tale of 3 Tibooks...

    My apologies for any confusion. I didn't intend to imply that a 500MHz G3 with a Rage128 and a 100MHz bus would numerically, on paper, outperform a 1000Mhz G4 on a 133MHz bus with a Radeon 9000. Of course if you get a raw CPU benchmark, a 1000MHz G4 will be much faster than a 500MHz G3. I suppose that seemed obvious enough to me not to have to say it. At the time, I was using SETI@home Classic and, sure enough, the TiBook rocked at fast fourier transforms, which I'd bet fit within its meg of L3 cache. (I believe BOINC had come online by the time I got the Pismo, I don't remember if I ever used SETI Classic on the Pismo, but I did on a blue G3/450 tower, and, the TiBook was, as you'd expect, much faster at raw out-and-out compute that only touches the CPU.) My, admittedly anecdotal, and it appears literally nobody else had this kind of experience, is that the TiBook buckled immediately and hard once you started to do certain types of difficult work on it. Mine was "looking at photos." (In OS X, which was my daily OS at the time, because of convenience and the web.) It was bad in iPhoto with 2-megapixel JPEGs, which were a common file format and size in 2002 when the TiBook/867-1000 launched, and it got worse when I got a camera that could produce 6 megapixel RAW files. The TiBook was solidly "fine" at mostly everything else I did with it. Email, internet, word processing, page layout, and even (because this relies more on achieving a certain consistent throughput, which became trivial in 1999, than random i/o perf) ripping DV tapes and simple standard def video editing with DV files. In retrospect, the problem was the disk drive. The TiBooks (and first-gen AlBook) all shipped with 4200RPM hard disks as stock, because it wasn't until later that there were two suppliers of 5400RPM laptop hard disks, at which point Apple adopted them for PowerBooks. From a technical perspective, I could have worked around the problem by using an external firewire hard disk, or buying my own 5400RPM laptop hard disk and installing it. I didn't have the means (or, to be honest, I was a literal child at the time, so, the knowledge) to do that. It really, really, soured the experience of using a machine that retailed for $2,799 and was under three years old. I've thought for years that the $2,800 would have been better spent on almost any other combination of Mac hardware at the time. The scenario was, I don't know if this is unique, but it was one where the machine showed up one day largely in exchange for my coming along quietly with a big cross-country move into some much smaller living quarters. It's not exactly relevant here, but it's perhaps useful context for why I as a literal child even had a TiBook. It suffered lots of random physical failures along the way, more than any other laptop I've had up to this point, and suffered a display failure I didn't have the means/wherewithal to recover from, so I swapped it for a pismo, which itself did have an upgraded disk installed. Between that and ho-hum normal 5400-7200RPM desktop drives in my 450MHz blue-and-white tower doing my photo work as fast as the TiBook, I don't think it was entirely unreasonable for Young Cory to come away with the impression that G4s were bad machines. That was, of course, bolstered by the bad physical reliability of the G4 I happened to have. And then by the fact that the slowest MacBook Pro that ended up shipping, the 1.83GHz Core1Duo model, also managed to outperform my TiBook at the photo tasks. A faster disk would've resolved a lot for me, but I still think, given that my workload in 2005 isn't even remotely comparable to what most people are doing on vintage OS 9 machines today, that recommending a PowerBook or iBook G3 over a TiBook today for that need is reasonable. You miss out on the upgraded screen and the newer graphics, but you're not really missing out on any real-world performance improvements for OS 9 apps. I'm not convinced that OS 9 gaming on TiBooks is a thing a lot of people are interested in, mostly because we'd hear about it if they were. From what I can tell, most of the vintage Mac gaming people are either fine on Pismos and iBooks, or they're doing "maximum possible" PowerMac G4 configs. And if you wanted to use apps that ran in OS X and needed a lot of horsepower anyway, you could just get much newer PowerPC Macs (such as the last round of G4s, as suggested above, or G5s) or, heck, Macs released up through 2012 will run 10.6, which still has Rosetta. Re Radeon 9250 and Core Image: Whoops, sure enough. I was mis-remembering both some mini specs and the Core Image information. The second group of Aluminum PowerBook G4s supports CoreImage, and the 1.42GHz eMac supports it with a Radeon 9600, but only some (17-20") of the last generation of iMac G4 support it, no G4 minis support it, and on the PowerMac side, of course the MDDs support it, but talking about PowerMac CoreImage support is a little moot as you can install newer graphics cards into any PowerMac G4 minus the Yikes.
  25. Cory5412

    A tale of 3 Tibooks...

    To add: What I'm saying is that the on-paper performance boost to OS 9 from an upgrade from the fastest PowerBook G3 to the fastest PowerBook G4 isn't worth the trade off in physical reliability and flexibility. This isn't relevant today but historically the G3 had a huge operational advantage with the modular bays where you could put two big third party batteries in and get 12-15 hours off-network with OS 9 and 8-10 hours in OS X on wifi. Those figures would probably be boosted today by installing an SSD. The TiBook has a better display, and if you're going to strap it to a desk anyway, having DVI output to run bigger/nicer monitors better is an advantage, but at that point there's no reason not to get a Mac mini or a PowerMac G4, both of which can far outperform the TiBook, even at OS X, because the Mac mini's graphics supports CoreImage. (Ironically, at this exact moment, on eBay US, TiBooks are trending a fair bit cheaper than Mac mini g4s, so if performance wasn't important and having the fastest TiBook wasn't important, you can get a pretty good deal BIN on a working TiBook for under $100, whereas the cheapest mini on US eBay at the moment is $110 BIN. Last year, this was very much the reverse where G4 minis were going for like $30.)
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