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Cory5412

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Everything posted by Cory5412

  1. Cory5412

    Wiki/Pages article ideas

    With thanks to trag!
  2. Cory5412

    Wiki/Pages article ideas

    Of late, I've come across two things that would make great wiki pages. This thread is mostly for me to keep track of those things to either ultimately write them or ask for them to be written. Right now, the wiki is in "OK but not great" shape and the long-term The first is documenting the RAM speeds in Wombat motherboards. In particular: What is the RAM speed on the Quadra 800, Q650, and 25/33MHz C650s. The second is information about booting from USB on PowerPC Macs. In particular, what models can boot from USB, what OSes can they boot, and if necessary what commands are needed. Older, but also relevant: Mac hardware and OS disk limit information and testing. Most of the information is gathered, but it would be nice for it to be a page rather than a post in the middle of a thread. Added 2019-01-26: What Macs can boot OS 9 (stock/default). Added 2019-04-04: IIci/IIsi video output system, support for 640x480@60 or no. I still haven't played with the Pages functionality, but we do have it. Please feel free to add more ideas especially if you see forum threads that should be captured or rewritten as articles or anything that doesn't exist yet but would be good reference information.
  3. Cory5412

    Macintosh Performa 5200CD

    The TAM isn't a bad computer, it's a really good computer, even, it's just not a good deal from a pure price-performance perspective. The 603e/ev machines got really good reviews from the Mac magazines back in the day. They made no bones about the PCI-based consumer Macs being lots better than the upgraded Performa 630s, in almost every way. They typically said that day-to-day performance was comparable to a 604e of approximately the same speed, so a TAM/250 or a 6500/250 was absolutely a respectable computer to actually use. Executive desk accessory isn't meant to imply the TAM wasn't performant enough to do real work on, because it absolutely was - just that if you're putting multi-thousand dollar desks into an executive suite or conference room, a TAM is one of the classiest available Macs to add to it at the moment. The next best would have been to get an Apple Studio Display, which launched at $2000 in mid-late 1998. (Making it really more contemporary to a beige g3 than a 6500 or TAM, but, just for comparison's sake.) The TAM's price did ultimately float downward, too. I believe you could ultimately pick one up for around $3999 or so, which is a lot more in line with what it was as a product, in terms of being a fashion accessory version of a machine that was $2,599. (Even up to, say, $4,399 or so I'd agree, in part because I don't think the 6500/250 config I listed above had the video/TV+fm kit, and then you have to consider the buy-up in sound and to an LCD display, even if you'll argue that the multiple scan 15av is a better monitor with sound that's about as good (and I don't disagree.) You can make the exact same argument about a Libretto, because in the day those were typically based on older hardware that had been miniaturized and made to run with less power, and were more expensive than larger machines with
  4. Cory5412

    Macintosh Performa 5200CD

    Spicy in the sense that most people really like the TAM and most people don't have much love for the rest of the 5000/6000 series, even the 6360 and x400/x500 versions with the updated architecture. I agree completely that at its original price it didn't make financial sense. The TAM was absolutely an enthusiast/fashion statement, or something like an executive desk accessory.
  5. Cory5412

    Macintosh Performa 5200CD

    I feel like that's a fairly spicy take, but, man, at its original price tag, the TAM is such a bad value, despite actually kind of being a reasonably good computer. Granted, it's hard to get the TAM down to what it "should" have cost, in-itu, because LCDs are so expensive and they used the best available one at the moment, so you have to look at, say, the 6500/250 and the TAM and realize that the reason why even a non-delivery TAM was a grand more was really because of the display and audio systems. (For comparison, in early '97, a 6500/250 in 4/48/33.6 with a business performa bundle (incl. office 4.2) was $2,599 and a multiple-scan 15av was $449.)
  6. Cory5412

    Macintosh Performa 5200CD

    Pretty nice find! A little cleaning to do, but I think that's par for the course. I would like a 5200 one day, but I've got a 6200 and that'll have to be good enough for now. 6200s are also nice specifically because they usually go for very little. They are one of the least expensive "starter" vintage Macs, and because they used IDE and the CD-ROM drives often still work in them, they are easy to get running again. They're not really that bad. My apologies if you've already seen all this before: The 5200 and 6200 bench, for all practical purposes, identically to the 6100/60 in macbench 4 from 1998, and with newer OS releases (8.1/8.6, for example) fewer parts of the OS are emulated and as such you can avoid the main weak point in the entire system, which is the low amount of cache, which hurts the 68k emulator more than anything else. The whole "right 32, left 32" thing is stuff that Low End Mac authors made up in the late '90s, for no identifiable or good reason, and became The Default Narrative. The entire thing about the serial ports and "hardware handshaking" is also all entirely fictional. The 6200 uses the same serial chip as (surprisingly) the 630, which uses the same serial chip as "every other Mac from the Plus to the G3". In reality, the architecture is "Performa 630, but with a pre-integrated 603 upgrade chip", similar to 486 architectures that had Pentiums bolted on in the mid '90s. More: https://www.taylordesign.net/classic-macintosh/the-mythical-road-apple/ As you said, they run a range of OS versions and you can add ethernet to them and the a/v kit is a cool party trick that not all other Macs have and these being slightly newer are usually fairly reliable,and the 5200 (vs. the 5260 in particular) have pretty midrange 832x624 displays, which is also an upgrade (at least in terms of working space) from what most people had on their 68k Macs 15+ years ago. I've got a 6200 myself and it's clearly not as fast as the other machines that came after it and compared with something like an 8600 (or even a 7200, or what you can put in an x100 PDS slot) the graphics aren't great, but they're suitable machines. It would be a good machine to put 7.6.1 or 8.1 on and putter around with IE/Netscape 4, clarisworks/appleworks 4-5, and hypercard 2.x, plus oregon trail, which is most of what people want to do.
  7. Cory5412

    Wiki/Pages article ideas

    Article ideas: Machine code-names Architecture names/code-names
  8. Cory5412

    File size EXPLOSION when one HDD icon dragged onto another!

    Just to be clear, you were copying the contents of one disk (a 160 meg disk) onto an empty larger disk (the CF card)?
  9. Cory5412

    File size EXPLOSION when one HDD icon dragged onto another!

    Yes. Not really - drag and drop is fine normally. Disk Copy 6 should be able to image the contents of a disk to a file, provided the source disk is small enough. I've seen some people talk about using it to image systems they get and/or make steady state copies of systems. (I believe 4 gigs is the threshold) Retrospect would be the next best option, most likely, but I don't know how it actually handles with large datasets.
  10. Cory5412

    File size EXPLOSION when one HDD icon dragged onto another!

    This is a big part of, though technically incorrect, why people claim system 7 can't address large disks. For reference: I'm curious as to what you meant by "tied together" - did you drag the contents of one disk to another? The difference in size might be eplained by two systems worth of information being on one disk.
  11. Cory5412

    Mystery Icon?

    Good idea, and that is definitely what it seems like. It appears the Paladin had fairly few ports on it: https://www.journaldulapin.com/2011/11/01/prototype-le-paladin/ has a photo of the backside.
  12. Cory5412

    Mystery Icon?

    Just to be clear, the lock I was thinking of would install in the slot above the audio ports.
  13. Cory5412

    Mystery Icon?

    What system or device is this from? It doesn't look lke this matches up with the CC/5x0, or, well, any machine I can remember seeing. Ports of approximately that shape and size did get used for a couple different things- ADB and serial (printer/modem) for starters, as well as S-Video in some scenarios (although not many s-video ports were directly on the motherboard, 840 was, IDK about the 660.) When this cover is installed, what port is it? Is it possible it's a labeling oddity and that icon is for the Kensington lock slot above?
  14. Hi Everybody, Quick note on an error signing in. I posted to the bug report thread and I'm going to be notifying our tech person about it.' Sign-ins using an email address may not currently be working around it. The forum will tell you your user name and password are wrong if you try to sign in using your email address, even though the interface says it is a valid option. For the moment, the work-around to this is to sign in with your user name. One of us will post an update when we have more information about this. Best, Cory W.
  15. OP isn't on the forum, but I'm kind of interested in one of these - mostly to safegaurd against potential failure of the original power supply for vtools. Especially because my intent there is to ultimately be running 8 SATA hard disks (and the attendant four SATA cards). (This will go along with a re-casing.) So, part of it's to avoid moles to SATA power adapters, and part of it's for reliability, and part of it's to make sure I have sufficient power for all the cards and disks I intend to run.
  16. Cory5412

    VGA TO HDI-45 DIY?

    That adapter will let you use the AudioVision display on a vintage Mac. You can further adapt this adapter to VGA to use on a Mac such as the blue-and-white Power Macintosh G3 and some PowerBook G3s, whose VGA ports can handle the old fixed-sync Apple displays, but it will not let you use it on anything more modern.
  17. Cory5412

    Picked up some old machines from a friend

    Hey - sorry for the delay on this. Spent some time mapping things out on the ol' goog yesterday and ended up deciding on a route. That's, admittedly, pretty far out of the way. The trip is for a job interview and cash is a little tight at the moment, so I'm going to say no on that diversion for now, but at some point in the next couple years I need to get out that direction, and I'll definitely make a post when it happens.
  18. I picked up a few machines from a local friend. Here's what I know so far: iBook "SE" Indigo, 366MHz, 320MB/10GB, probably Combo. (Firewire!) - works, great condition, but needs its hard disk replaced probably. Gonna use this as my main mobile OS9 machine, esp. for vtools admin & dreamweaver. Have an original restore set. I could use one of the a/v output cables if someone's got one. iBook G4 12-inch 1.33GHz. 512MB/100GB, probably Combo. Also works, need to reformat. Unsure what I'm going to use this for yet. Possibly use it instead of a Mac mini for vtools file transfers w/ orig 10.4 install + patches, or 10.5. PowerBook 145B - unsure of details on this, except that I have a SCSI adapter, it looks like it has a modem, and a microphone. MacBook Pro (Late 2007 or early 2008) GF8600/2.0 - probably dead. iMac 'DV" 400. Probably 64/10, has box + accessory kit, original CDs. iMac Core/2Duo 2.0/[forgot] - also still in the car, is reported to be dead. Depending on how much time I have and what they look like when I finally bring them in, I'll probably recycle the MacBook Pro and the iMac. Tough saying what I'll do with them if they work, because I've not got a handful of machines from that particular era. If it ends up working, I'll likely use the iMac for some 10.5/10.6 utility stuff, perhaps the file transfers I mentioned above, but we'll see. There were also a couple spare ibook/powerbook AC adapters and a few zip disks in the lot. At least one serial cable, an HDI50-CEN50 SCSI cable, (might be the target disk mode cable, I need to look) and one or two firewire and USB cables from random peripherals the previous owner had. I'm going to swap a newer PC laptop I'm not using to them, since they mentioned being interested in repairing the macbook pro to give to a friend who is using something even older. (ouch). They might have some more stuff laying around, I'll put out a casual reminder to consider sending any e-waste to me.
  19. Cory5412

    Picked up some old machines from a friend

    I have just learned I am going to be traveling to northwestern Nevada for an appointment this coming week. @CC_333 - are you interested in coordinating a meet-up to pass off the Intel iMac and the MacBook Pro? Incidentally, if anyone in the area wants a project, I also have another slotloading iMac G3 that doesn't turn on at all, and I have the pink iMac that turns on but has problems (Though: at present moment I'd also kind of like to get the pink/strawberry iMac fixed up for my own use.) The best timing for me would be to hit up California before Friday and then decide after how I'll get back to Arizona (via Utah perhaps?).
  20. Cory5412

    Picked up some old machines from a friend

    I don't know - I just like having the packing material for something like this, if the need to ship it or move it comes up. It's a 15-incher, it's got the GeForce 8600, and if I remember correctly it's 2.0GHz. I'd be willing to send it to you. It's in okay physical shape. I don't remember, but I might put my iPhone on a tripod and record the bootup. It seemed to change at random, and it also seemed like it might have changed based on activity. For exmaple (machine booting 10.4.11) when I opened system preferences to try to change the resolution, things got weird. Incidentally - no change in overall behavior at the three different available/supported resolutions. I think this one has the VGA port at the bottom, I haven't tried plugging anything in there, yet.
  21. Cory5412

    Picked up some old machines from a friend

    imac G3 report: It's a 400/dv "Strawberry", 576 megs of RAM installed. Has the box - and more importantly, the original foam. I've got most or all of the original CD set plus a few printer driver discs. Plus, a red keyboard/mouse and an iMac power cable. Gotta have the essentials after all. Plastics are mostly good It turns on, the display lights up, but extremely inconsistently. It wiggles around and lights up and dims down. Plus it falls out of focus/convergence. I've never personally witnessed a display doing this. Flyback/capacitors? MacBook Pro report: I haven't tried an external display yet, but I'm around 90% sure this is dead. I might TDM boot it to wipe the disk, or just take the disk/RAM out to use them in things like ThinkPad R61s and an old Core1 Vaio I have hanging around. It also has its box and foam, and a power adapter, which has a frayed end, so I haven't tested it. (Used witha known good 85w adapter from work.) Probably destined for recycling as, to be honest, I don't know that this machine is salvageable per se.
  22. Cory5412

    You can never have too many storage options...

    I should clarify Re MO: By 1998, which was admittedly a couple years into Zip being available, MO was less expensiver per gig, for the cartridges, but with the up front cost of a drive, there's obviously a particular crossover point at which you either have under or over a certain amount where one of the options is, in total, more eocnomical than the other. I haven't put together information on what that looked like in, say, 1997, or 1996. Of course, in the US in particular, a lot of what made Zip "win" was that you could buy the cartridges at Wal Mart and Staples. That late 1998 issue of MacWorld was the one where MacWorld correctly identified "add more hard disks" as the msot viable and cost effective general purpose storage solution, and that's pretty much been where we've been since. Relatedly, the big disadvantage of MO is traditionally performance. Cartridge systems have existed since, but the advent of USB and Firewire meant that the need for a storage platter to be removable from the actual "mechanism" is essentially long gone. Without removable systems, you would previously have had to turn off your computer and re-wire internal or external peripherals to change what particular set of data you were working on, especially for any piece of information bigger than a floppy diskette. EDIT/add: In 1998, the other-other thing is that 640-meg 3.5" MO cartridges are less expensive than both Zip and Jaz per-meg, but if Zip filled a need for relatively small datasets. Older 128/230-meg MO cartridges would have worked in a 640 mechanism, but I don't know at that moment how that would have changed the cost.
  23. Cory5412

    You can never have too many storage options...

    Iomega was intentionally selling the Zip drives at or below cost, and was selling the disks for a relatively healthy margin. The intent was to, essentially, simulate the razor blade/ink printer markets. Theory theory was that with the drives and disks priced just so, they'd be able to generate near infinite demand. In reality, the costs for the disks were high enough that the storage market for '90s data-hoarders didn't really materialize the way Iomega thought it did. The other thing is Iomega spent a lot of money getting Zip into as many retailers and pre-built systems as possible. It was a successful plan to build something that defacto ended up succeeding floppies until USB flash disks became possible/reasonable in 2003, but. As far as disk production, Fuji and I believe possibly Imation (I'd have to check) produced their own. Fuji was building the internal magnetic media, so Iomega licensed the rest of the cartridge design back to them. This is moderately ironic because Iomega made at least some of the money that made it possible for Zip to exist and for Syquest to stop existing by (along with Nomai) cloning SyQuest 44/88/200 cartridges, due to a technicality in the way SyQuest's patent was written and the actual physical design of the way their drives and cartridges were built. The other frustrating thing is that Iomega had better technologies, but Zip is just what ended up being cheap enough to sell like that. Even worse is that ultimately MO was actually cheaper per megabyte than Zip if you had more than just a couple disks worth of data. Fun and nostalgia is pretty much the only reason to use any of these formats for anything. SCSI2SD v5.5 is arguably better and more reliable as a removable or swappable media format for any kind of "actual use". I picked up an EZ-135 and a Bernoulli 230, mostly because they're Neat. I have some Zip stuff, but I dislike it a lot, aesthetically, mostly because I believe Iomega behaved very badly as a company.
  24. This was only ever true for writes, and even then mostly stopped being true for mainstream computer SSDs a decade ago. For the type of work a Quadra 660 is capable of, a good high end SD card, which is recommended, will last for Quite A While. The other aspect of this is that with sufficient memory, even with virtual memory turned on, Classic Mac OS does almost no random disk writes for no good reason, the way modern computers do. (For example, most modern web browsers, near constantly write data to your hard disk, which is what allows quick crash/tab recovery, and continuous updating text editors like Atom and VS Code do something similar.) More importantly, there's a dwindling supply of working mechanical SCSI HDDs that are suitable for these machines. The 660 with 7.6.1 or 8.1 will happily run very very large disks, so if you found the right chain of adapters and a 300 gig server disk, for example, it would work, but as has been mentioned, cooling will be an issue, especially if your 660 has a CD drive and any cards installed. If your 660 has a working disk now, it's not a bad idea to get a SCSI2SD to use as a backup, or back up important data on it to a server (whether that's an a2server or something off-site such as vtools) and make sure you have bootable media to recover/reinstall from. A future project I'd like to do, unless someone else wants to do it sooner, is to build, say, 7.1 Pro, 7.5.5, and 7.6.1 media that has the necessary upgrades pre-integrated on the CD. (Ideally: it's just a pre-patched installation distribution, but in reality it'll most likely be a set of SimpleText documents showing what to install, along with some other common getting started items, such as Stuffit and Disk Utility and an FTP client or web browser.) If you were feeling really extravegant or you had several old Macs you wanted to reinstall often, a SCSI2SD v5.5 with one or more SD card set up to do installs on a few different types of Macs would be a neat addition to a toolkit, and would ease the pain of having dying/dead CD or floppy drives.
  25. Cory5412

    You can never have too many storage options...

    At first I was like "I'm glad I'm not the only one who calls my software share "sw"" until I read this. Very nice! 7.5.5 and 7.6 should be able to do 4-gig partitions on an LC III. Most '040s minus PowerBooks and the 630/580 should be able to do up to 2TB volumes over SCSI. Bernoulli!
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