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BadGoldEagle

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About BadGoldEagle

  • Birthday 04/18/1996

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  • Website URL
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXC7eF1qRzavpcrWPjtG2gA

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Compact Macs and post 1998 Macs (PPC and Intel)

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  1. BadGoldEagle

    Apple CD SC question

    Should work.
  2. BadGoldEagle

    Apple CD SC question

    The lens on mine was pretty dirty as well... I had to take it apart and clean it with isopropanol and a q tip. What type of CDs did you try it with? Give plain Audio CDs a go. They tend to work better with units that need servicing (something to do with the surface being easier for the laser to read compared to pressed data CDs or CD-Rs, the latter being really difficult to get working...) And bibilit is again absolutely right. Sound does NOT pass through SCSI. You need a pair of speakers connected at the back. It also won't start playing immediately. So you definitely need software to interact with it. You can get it here: http://macintoshgarden.org/apps/applecd150 (The 150 is the successor to the successor of the CD SC) but that program is backwards compatible and works with 6.0.5 or later And finally, yes, unfortunately, caps are a problem on these units...
  3. BadGoldEagle

    Laserwriter / Laserwriter Plus refurbishment

    I’m also interested. I don’t have a Laserwriter yet but I’d like to have one some day. There are a lot of guides on how to refurbish floppy drives, cases, logicbords etc but surprisingly none are for printers. I have an original ImageWriter that has some serious issues (foam degradation, rust, lack of lubrication in general). I have managed to find the service manual (which wasn’t easy back when i originally searched for it!) but there’s no real how to guide for any printer...
  4. BadGoldEagle

    No sound from Color Classic

    Yes but that will be temporary. You just fixed some of the shorting traces. It will happen again. And again, and again. Only a proper recap: bath or really good scrub and new capacitors/solder can fix it. Then it’ll be good for another 20 years hopefully.
  5. BadGoldEagle

    No sound from Color Classic

    Yes. http://www.maccaps.com/MacCaps/Capacitor_Reference/Entries/1994/2/2_Macintosh_LC_550.html
  6. BadGoldEagle

    SE/30 RP12 replacement part, bourns filter

    uniserver uses this part # to replace the original filters. It works as it should and as you mentioned, it’s a drop in replacement. I need to get one for my SE 1/40.
  7. BadGoldEagle

    SE/30 RP12 replacement part, bourns filter

    Topic already discussed here: 4120Rs are 20 pin packages and 4116Rs are 16 pin packages. 4120R-601-250/201 are available on farnell.
  8. BadGoldEagle

    Craigslist Mac SE, Mac SE, and Mac Plus

    Great job there. It looks magnificent. I personally use scotch tape to stick the speaker back in. Doesn't look elegant but at least it's easy to remove it for future retr0bright sessions. This is an early SE: stepper motor HD and squirrel-cage fan. Those are loud but they're period correct. If I were you, I would upgrade both or leave it as is. It's up to you though. My M5010 SE (twin floppy model) once had the squirrel-cage fan but the previous owner upgraded it. I might go for a Noctua and a SCSI2SD to make it completely silent. As for the video issue... could be a number of things. Something as simple as a bad solder joint can cause this. I would refresh every single one before moving on to recapping it. Those boards kinda need it nowadays anyhow.
  9. BadGoldEagle

    Iomega Jaz SCSI cable

    Can you post a picture of the drive's connector?
  10. BadGoldEagle

    Cloning old SCSI drive to SD for SCSI2SD

    Hello To sum things up, you first need to find a way to plug the SCSI2SD and the old hard drive to your Classic II simultaneously. You need an old hard drive enclosure (can be costly and perhaps you don't have the desk space for it...) or one of these adapters. Either way, you're going to need a cable to connect it to the Mac. Be careful as most HD enclosures use a Centronics SCSI connector. The Mac doesn't. You'd need a C50 to DB25 adapter if you choose to go that way. If you go for the small PCB adapter (which is what I recommend), get this cable (not a centronics cable...) and a male/male gender changer. The only problem is that those cables are also used for serial and not all pins are connected when that's the case. It might be worth checking with the seller before you buy it. Once the hardware part is covered, you have a few options to do the backup... 1/ Just copy the HD's contents over to a new partition on the SCSI2SD. The system folder may need to be blessed (common issue, google it for more info...). 2/ Use Shrinkwrap (you can install that on the SCSI2SD. I have a partition ready with System 7.5 and Shrinkwrap on an SD card. It's become my backup station.) and create a disk image of the old hard drive. You can use disk copy 6 too but I've had really good results with Shrinkwrap. This later enables you to transfer the image from the SD card to your modern computer and use it with mini vMac or Basilisk II. I covered this method here. Good luck!
  11. BadGoldEagle

    Mac SE FD/HD score, minor quirks

    According to Larry Pina, this could be caused by a bad scsi chip
  12. BadGoldEagle

    My Maccon didn't survive the right angle operation...

    Thanks Joe! You are right, it is B25, not B24. My bad, sorry! And the real 'issue' I'm having tonight is that A22 isn't connected to 5V anymore. That's good but why was I getting a reading earlier today? My multimeter beeps every 5 mins or so if you don't use it. It makes the same high pitched sound as if the two prongs were connected. That could be it... Tomorrow I'll go hunting some more traces, but this time, I'll be armed with the pinouts! I had completely forgotten that the upper PDS connector mirrors the one on the LB. Somehow I got into my head that there was some conversion involved. But even if that was the case, ground and power should still be at the same locations.
  13. BadGoldEagle

    Universal Install vs SE/30 install

    Hi all Most of the things I tried to do yesterday and today with my SE/30 fail miserably... Now I've got a IIsi ROM installed and Mac OS 7.5 gets stuck on the Welcome to Macintosh screen. I remember reading somewhere I should have an Universal installation for this hack to work properly. I don't want to reformat the entire hard drive or change the system folder too much. So, what kind of files in the system folder are specific to the machine? Which ones should I switch for new ones?
  14. BadGoldEagle

    My Maccon didn't survive the right angle operation...

    I went digging and found that these were connected. Doesn't look good. And I can't desolder most of these joints. As if my iron isn't powerful enough... I remember having issues with those rows when I desoldered the old connector. Any idea what can be wrong on that front?
  15. BadGoldEagle

    My Maccon didn't survive the right angle operation...

    Hi Bolle It has and always had two jumper wires near the original PDS connector. That didn't change. I checked individually every connection going from the old PDS to the new one. All of them work. I didn't do the greatest job ever, and apparently there's one line that connects all three rows. I don't know if that's normal or not. The legs aren't bridged together... That leaves the pads on the other side (as you pointed out) or the chips themselves... I removed the connector by sucking every solder joint one at a time. The connector was a that point a bit loose so I jittered it a bit and it literally came apart. I was left with pins all over the board that I had to remove manually. I don't think it tore apart the pads but I guess that's a possibility. I tried my hot air gun but the solder just won't melt, even on the highest setting. I don't have a flux pen but I guess that would help. If I start over with the sucking method I might break that other connector and as you know, they tend to be quite costly.
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