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trag

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Everything posted by trag

  1. At some point I thought they changed the power supply connector in the desktop 7X00 machine. I thought it was with the 7600, but it might have been with the 7300. In any case, I would not expect the 7300 to have the same pinout as all the other metioned models. The 8600/9600 certainly don't.
  2. trag

    8100 and 8500 PSU pinouts

    I'm pretty sure the 8500 and the 7500 have the same power connectors. It's the same circuit board (logic board) populated slightly differently. So if you can find a power supply diagram for the 7500, it applies also the 8500. There's a good chance the 9500 uses the same scheme as well, but I'm less confident of that. The 8600 changed the power connectors a little. I think the 7600 did as well.
  3. trag

    Problem with FloppyEmu

    Remember, it's 64 Kbits. While probably still overkill, it may have been the smallest thing economically available at the time. And yes, definitely the SCC chip. 85C3008 specifically, IIRC.
  4. trag

    Problem with FloppyEmu

    Correct. The Outbound has it's own circuitry. Not a Plug logic board in there. Also, one could use either Plus or SE ROMs.
  5. trag

    Problem with FloppyEmu

    28 pin interface back to the logic board. I don't know how the pins are used or even if they are all used. 28 pins for the external floppy, which uses essentially the same interface board. 44 pins or some such on the internal connector. Whatever an IDE hard drive + power connectors would use. Also, that 28 pin external cable/interface is used both for the external floppy and the external SCSI adapter (one or the other). Both boards have an 85C30 at the input end, facing that 28 pin connector. The SCSI adapter pretty much just has a 53C80, and a GAL in addition to the 85C30. I can't remember if it also has a flash. I should check my notes at home. I've always assumed that the ROM is there as a simple logic translation device. If I have an input of 12 give me an output of 4F. That kind of thing. Again, would need to create a schematic for more information. Yep, no pictures on line that I've ever seen. Next time I did one out I'll take some photos. I wish I still had a scanner. Scans of circuit boards on a flatbed have always turned out better than my photography efforts, even when I remember to put the camera in Macro mode.
  6. trag

    SCSI Voodoo HowTo

    I saw JT's mention of the need for this thread here: http://68kmla.org/forums/viewtopic.php?p=163030#p163030 so I decided to start rolling that ball. I posted a lot about this topic back in the 90s in the comp.sys.mac.* hierarchy in the news groups, so at first, I'm just going to quote some of my old postings as I find them. After a week of desultory searching in Advanced Google Groups Search, I've found my first useful posting, quoted below Early SCSI History: Okay, that's rather incomplete because it's so out of date and not very concise. But I don't have time to write something short and to the point at the moment. Oh, I also found this useful link: http://www.scsifaq.org/ I'm still looking for my old postings on configuring SCSI chains properly and the finer points of mixing wide and narrow drives. As I recall, those had some nice ASCII diagrams included.
  7. trag

    Problem with FloppyEmu

    That can't be the 85C30 for the serial ports, because the Outbound has serial ports and it doesn't always have a floppy drive. There's only room for either an internal floppy drive, or an internal hard drive. Not both. So when the hard drive is installed, there is no 85C30 in the drive cage. Circuitry on the Outbound is a load of logic ICs and probably some PLDs, but nothing is much bigger than 20 pin DIPs. I think there's an 85C30 actually on the board, though. No 53C80 because SCSI is an external option. I've always assumed that the Xicor chip is playing games with the voltage that drives the floppy motor to vary the speed in 800K mode. I really need to create a schematic some day. Without the controller board, the floppy mechanism is certainly fixed speed, and there are no special connections visible. It's always possible that Outbound opened every floppy case and did surgery prior to installation....
  8. Compatibility with SCSI cards was an early problem with the Nubus G3 upgrades. Newertech solved it before Sonnet did. Is it possible that you have an older version of the upgrade? I seem to remember that compatibility with the JackHammer was fixed first, but I might have that backwards. Does your 7100 boot okay without the SEIV. I've found that pretty much all 7100s need their CPU/Heat Sink grease cleaned off and replaced othewise they overheat shortly after booting up.
  9. trag

    Problem with FloppyEmu

    Someone might, but I don't. What I do know is: The floppy mechanism is a standard (unless stealth modifications were done) laptop style PC floppy mechanism manufactured by Citizen. Between the floppy interface and the Outbound is a circuit board. The circuit board contains an 85C30 (I think this handles whatever comm protocol that goes between the laptop and the floppy assembly), a WD37C65 floppy controller, a WD92C32 data separator, a 64Kb flash chip and a single 20 pin GAL PLD. Oh, and there's a Xicor (XC9030, IIRC) digital potentiometer, which almost certainly plays some part in the variable speed control of the floppy spin speed. On the Laptop itself, in addition to the Apple ROM on a SIMM, there are two 64Kb Flash/EEPROM chips which contain configuration code of some kind. These chips are updated when the Outbound installer runs. I know that they contain information on what internal device is installed (floppy vs. 20, 40, 60, 80 MB hard drive) and hte data is different for each size hard drive. They could also contain an extended floppy control routine. All the components are fairly simple, and there's only the two places where code could be stored in Flash (counting the pair of chips on the Laptop as a single place).
  10. I put the contents of the CDROM I used to ship with hacked R7000 cards in my web space. Has some rudimentary instructions for using the card with 8.6. https://www.prismnet.com/~trag/R7000/ATI R7000 Parts/
  11. trag

    Problem with FloppyEmu

    The Outbound Laptop Model 125 also adds 1.44 MB floppy support to a machine with Mac Plus ROMs.... I have an AEHD+ in the attic somewhere... Back when I got it, I opened the case, saw a giant (~88+ pin) PLCC FPGA and closed it right back up again.
  12. I know I got the R7000 working under 8.5 or 8.6. I had to hand install some extensions, IIRC. The card works fine under 7.6.1 but one may not be able to load all the drivers to enable acceleration.
  13. trag

    Macintosh Portable Video Adapter

    Thank you, techknight. I have several hundred little LCD displays (probably unused Pager stock) in the attic that have a chip-on-glass controller that looks like one of the standard Epson ones, maybe a 1335. I have the datasheet on an old drive at home that would tell me which controller I deduced it was. And an embedded flat flex cable to the controller. My (very old) plan has been to trace out the cable connections to the chip bumps with a microscope and then experiment to get it working. I can afford to blow a few in the process. On the other hand, I haven't started any projects that require a bunch of displays, so little motivation, what with all the life and procrastination going on. Kind of silly of me to buy the displays in the first place, but it was one of those Ebay lots one used to see (not so common any more) where it's something like 648 LCD displays; current bid $10.83. Heck, one might find a use for them some day, right?
  14. trag

    Problem with FloppyEmu

    It was capable of reading and writing standard 1.44 MB floppies. I guess it might also have supported some other odd size, but the point of the thing, IIRC, was to give the old Plus compatibility with the new big floppies. Did it really need a driver? For some reason I thought it was a bootable device, but my memories are old and flimsy.
  15. trag

    Macintosh Portable Video Adapter

    Techknight, do you know of any good primers on how to interface with LCDs. I guess there may be such a variety of methods that it doesn't lend itself to a summary. But maybe they all have enough in common that it does. If I knew, I wouldn't need to ask.
  16. trag

    Problem with FloppyEmu

    Time to find the Applied Engineering AEHD+ and figure out what magic it used to make 1.44MB floppies work on the Plus.... IIRC, there's a big (for the time) honking FPGA in the thing.
  17. The one time I had a bad JackHammer card it was one of the two inductors. Those two cylinders in the lower left corner of the board in the photo. Cheap and easy to replace. It was some common value like 100 UH or some such. I might have it written down or posted it somewhere long ago.
  18. trag

    Connecting an Imagewriter II to a OS 9 Pismo?

    If you can find the LocalTalk Option for the IWII then the task is relatively easy. If the Pismo has serial ports, just configure Appletalk to use one of the serial ports and network the Pizmo to the IWII. If the PIzmo has only Ethernet, then you'd need both the LocalTalk Option for the IWII and a LocalTalk to Ethernet bridge of some kind. There were software versions and then there were dedicated boxes like the AsanteTalk and earlier MicroAsantePrint.
  19. trag

    SCSI Voodoo HowTo

    It sounds like they may have used those 110 ohm SIPPs you referenced above and just tied the signals directly to ~3 V. It is good that you double checked. ============================================== Later Edit: And now that you've set me off... Found this document. See page 2. It describes the style of termination that your drive must be using. Page 1 describes the original 330/220 style. Everywhere I wrote ~3V in this message, change it to 2.85V. https://www.analog.com/media/en/reference-design-documentation/design-notes/dn034f.pdf =============================================== I just reread http://www.bourns.com/pdfs/scsitermap.pdf referenced several messages above and it states that there are 18 signals to terminate. Three eight-pin SIPPs of the 330/220 variety would provide that, because they lose one pin each to 5V and GND, leaving six signal pins on each SIPP. Three times six is then eighteen. However, two ten pin SIPPs just can't terminate eighteen signals using 330/220 SIPPs. There are only 8 signals lines per SIPP, yielding 16 signal lines. Two 11 pin SIPPs could terminate eighteen signals using 330/220 SIPPs, but that's not what we've got here. So, my best guess is that pin one of your RP1 and RP2 are a regulated ~3V. All the other pins are signal pins and when the SIPP is installed are tied through a 110 ohm resistor to pin 1, giving you 9 signal pins per SIPP and yielding the full 18 signals. In this case you want the 101 circuit (See Figure labeled "Bussed Resistors (101 Circuit)" on page 2 of https://www.bourns.com/data/global/pdfs/4600H.pdf). You will want the 110 ohm version. The part number should be something like 4600H-101-111 or in more modern terms, something like this: https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Bourns/4610X-101-111LF?qs=sGAEpiMZZMvrmc6UYKmaNfXDPPK60BkBqMgbUjJrIUk%3d Actually, any of these should work: https://www.mouser.com/Passive-Components/Resistors/Resistor-Networks-Arrays/_/N-e89l?P=1z0wo93&Keyword=bourns+101-111&FS=True If you really want to be certain, get a copy of the pinout for the 50 pin SCSI connector. Identify the 8 data lines, 1 parity line, and 9 control lines. Check that each of those eighteen lines has unique continuity with one of the pins in RP1 or RP2 and none of them connect to Pin 1 of RP1 or RP2. That would make it certain that when using the 101 style SIPPs each signal is simply being connected through 110 ohms to a ~3V source. For Future Reference: Given that 18 signals must be terminated: 1) If your hard drive uses three 8 pin SIPPs, then it is probably using the 104 circuit, 330/220 style SIPPs. 2) If your hard drive uses two 10 pin SIPPs then it is probably using the 101 circuit 110 ohm (?) style SIPP. (still a little uncertain about what resistance the SIPP should be and what voltage pin 1 should be regulated to). 3) IF your hard drive uses two 11 pin SIPPs then it is probably using the 104 circuit 330/220 style SIPPs. Guide to part numbers for the above situations are in https://www.bourns.com/data/global/pdfs/4600H.pdf In all three cases go to https://www.mouser.com/Passive-Components/Resistors/Resistor-Networks-Arrays/_/N-e89l/ 1 & 3) Search on "Bourns 104-221/331" Then select "220 ohms, 330 ohms" in the "Resistor Values" field., For Case 1, select "8" and for Case 3 select "11" in the "Number of Pins" field and click on "Apply Filters". 2) From the link above, search on "Bourns 101-111". Select "10" in the "Number of Pins" field and click on "Apply Filters". Moderators: Is it possible to change my May 8th 2013 message. This part is wrong, " For the 10 or 11 pin (2 required) SCSI termination pack use Bourns 4311-104-221/331. Or if it's 10 pin then 4310-104-221/331. " Maybe insert a note that if your hard drive uses 10 pin SIPPs look down to this message.
  20. trag

    SCSI Voodoo HowTo

    Simple enough to check. Just check continuity on the pins at the ends of the two connectors. Again, a connector that expects the 330/220 style will have 5V at one end and GND at the other end. Should be able to use the power connector for the other end of hte test, most likely, unless they put a voltage regulator in between. The configuration you show in the picture would just have GND, probably, at Pin 1. The other nine pins would be connected to SCSI signals.
  21. trag

    SCSI Voodoo HowTo

    That should be the thing. It's possible that I went down a rabbit hole and didn't know it, but I don't think so. Proper SCSI terminators connect each terminal to ground through a 220 0r 330 ohm resistor and the same terminal to 5V through the other resistor value (don't remember which is which). And looking at https://www.bourns.com/data/global/pdfs/4600H.pdf that's what that part does. For added confirmation you might confirm that the first and last terminal for each resistor pack connects to either GND or 5V and that none of the intervening terminals do. Oh, they (intervening terminals) will probably have connectivity with some resistance, but they won't connect with near zero resistance.
  22. trag

    RAM contact pads pitted , can I repair?

    If you want to get fancy, you can electroplate the contacts. Not much point if the RAM has solder contacts, but if they are copper or gold, it probably still isn't worth it, but I just wanted to mention the possibility. https://www.caswellplating.com/electroplating-anodizing.html#
  23. The connector, hardware-wise, looks like one of the Hirose DX series. Connectors manufactured by Hirose whose part number starts with DX.
  24. trag

    Boxed iMac G4 + PowerBook 1400CS

    I expected that was the case, but also imagined the scenario where you decide to clear the space after some period, and I had not spoken up...
  25. Thank you for sharing the solution here. I appreciate it.
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