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Any 68k-capable web browser where SSL can be entirely disabled?

aperezbios

Well-known member
Hi folks, is anyone here aware of any of the standard web browsers which were available in the System 7/8 era, which either have no SSL support at all, or have the ability to entirely disable it?
 

AndiS

Well-known member
This has me thinking back pretty hard. But wasn't it possible to disable SSL (v1, v2) on Netscape 4.x as well as IE 4.x. iCab offers the same function too AFAIR.

I can check If you want to, but not before tomorrrow.
 

BacioiuC

Well-known member
Because modern SSL/TLS just isn't compatible with legacy SSL, and I'd rather have a browser that just failed to make connections to SSL-only websites.
My thread on WebOne died back with the data loss the forum suffered BUT you can get modern SSL to work with netscape 3.x and iCab! Check this out:


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IMG_1613.JPG
CNN with Images

You can install WebOne on a raspberry pi in the network and set it as a proxy. It will allow you to browse modern HTTPS websites. Just keep CSS disabled because poor ol' macs have less ram than macrumors.com uses for a background.
 

AndiS

Well-known member
I had time to check in the meantime and was able to disable SSL on iCab 2.6.x (last 68k version) as well as Netscape 4.x. On IE 4.x i did not find a setting regarding SSL though.

But if you connect to any modern and incompatible server with old SSL enabled, the connection will just fail. It is the same as disabling SSL from the start so why bother?
 

Daniël

Well-known member
But if you connect to any modern and incompatible server with old SSL enabled, the connection will just fail. It is the same as disabling SSL from the start so why bother?
Haven't tried in a while, so this might be inaccurate, but I do believe when it tries to establish an SSL connection to a modern TLS-protected website, it'll sit around doing effectively nothing for longer as it desperately tries to connect, than if you'd disable SSL altogether and it fails immediately.
 

AndiS

Well-known member
This is probably true. At least if it tryes to negotiate compatible cyphers. On old systems ihat would take some time for sure.
 
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