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Retrobright retrobrite tub idea


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On 4/6/2021 at 10:20 PM, davidg5678 said:

It does reasonably well, but there have been a few instances where I have found the paint to begin flaking off after the treatment. This hasn't happened to me every time, but I had a IIsi that lost about half its silver paint. Overall, the compact macs have done okay. I'm personally happy to lose a bit of paint if I can lower the risk of "marbling" the computer with a failed cream retrobrite. I have also noticed that metal shielding tends to corrode, so I always remove it first. This often means I have to cut the melted plastic holding it in place and glue it back down afterwards.

 

Fortunately, this isn't a super exact science. Typically, the higher the concentration of hydrogen peroxide, the faster things go. Highly concentrated peroxide isn't great to get on your skin, but once it is diluted with several gallons of water, this becomes less of an issue. (I would still recommend wearing rubber gloves) SalonCare comes as both a paste and a liquid depending on the exact product variant. Pool oxidizer is essentially the same 7% hydrogen peroxide, but rebranded. It is a bit cheaper than the 12% beauty/3% first-aid products, and works equally well.

 

+1 to all of this. I personally haven't noticed issues with the metal paint on my compacts. On anything with a metal shield, remove it. I use the 30 proof clear stuff from Sally Beauty. They've never asked what it's for, they just sell it to me. I have been meaning to try the pool oxidizer thing. As for concentration... I just wing it. The more concentrated it is, the faster things go!

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On 4/11/2021 at 5:01 AM, cannfoddr said:

I’ve invested in a cheap fish tank heater that seems to work well at heating the liquid to around 30 degrees C

 

Same! Mine gets the temperature up to about 32°C (90°F), which isn't quite enough for the reaction to happen quickly, but it gets the liquid closer to the right temperature. The sun takes it from there. Once I see about 40.5° (105°F) things really start happening.

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On 4/11/2021 at 7:13 PM, PotatoFi said:

 

Same! Mine gets the temperature up to about 32°C (90°F), which isn't quite enough for the reaction to happen quickly, but it gets the liquid closer to the right temperature. The sun takes it from there. Once I see about 40.5° (105°F) things really start happening.

I can push to around 32 degrees C - no chance in the UK of the Sun doing better than that.

 

I have a SE/30 ADB keyboard and mouse ready to go our in the sun tomorrow (if we get any).  Going to use Cream and clingfilm for this one as it has worked well on my 6400 panels and the 6400 keyboard and mouse.

 

Its interesting that on the SE/30 keyboard only the space bar seems to have yellowed - the rest of the keys match top and bottom after cleaning off all the crap.

 

The keyboard mainboard seems to have some yellowing around the chips and caps - do I need to be worried?

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19 hours ago, cannfoddr said:

Its interesting that on the SE/30 keyboard only the space bar seems to have yellowed

 

As I understand it, space bars are often made from a different plastic from the other keys for, if I remember correctly, rigidity reasons.  I have several computers of several kinds where the space bar has yellowed disproportionately compared to the other keys

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19 hours ago, cheesestraws said:

 

As I understand it, space bars are often made from a different plastic from the other keys for, if I remember correctly, rigidity reasons.  I have several computers of several kinds where the space bar has yellowed disproportionately compared to the other keys

64002150268__37819FCF-F203-4C0E-B10B-12FCD7E79A67.thumb.jpeg.6c466d85b0558a5c0611ae40e0a5b572.jpeg

 

Only going to retrobrite the spacebar - I have the same situation on a second ADB keyboard.

 

Do power cables suffer from the same Yellowing?  Mine are quite Yellow.

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20 hours ago, cheesestraws said:

 

As I understand it, space bars are often made from a different plastic from the other keys for, if I remember correctly, rigidity reasons.  I have several computers of several kinds where the space bar has yellowed disproportionately compared to the other keys

 

That's frequently the case on keyboards with PBT keycaps, the spacebar will still be the prone-to-yellowing ABS. Cheaper keyboards often just had all caps be ABS, though, like the AppleDesign keyboard.

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19 hours ago, Daniël Oosterhuis said:

That's frequently the case on keyboards with PBT keycaps, the spacebar will still be the prone-to-yellowing ABS. Cheaper keyboards often just had all caps be ABS, though, like the AppleDesign keyboard.

 

That's what I was thinking of, yup.  Thanks for the added precision, I couldn't remember what the plastics were :-).

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Looks great! If you can, get some 303 Aerospace Protectant, and wipe it down with that. Wipe off the excess with a clean rag. So far, none of mine that have been treated with that have re-yellowed.

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@cannfoddr That looks wonderful!  I think I'm going to have to dip my compacts this summer, if they are going to come out the other end looking like that :)

 

@PotatoFi Thanks for bringing that up.  I remember that spray being mentioned in an episode of Adrian's Digital Basement, but I couldn't remember what it was called or which episode it was mentioned in.  I'd definitely like to spray that on my plastics after retrobrighting.

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Just thought I’d chime in here and add that UV light is not a requirement.

 

I read up a bit on all the different techniques and theories a couple of years ago and decided to make an attempt with hydrogen peroxide + heat. My old Mac equipment is still in good condition, but I have an old IKEA clock that I’m fond of, as well as an inexpensive digital indoor/outdoor thermometer, both with white plastic parts that had yellowed badly on one side after being exposed to sunlight from a window continuously for many years.

 

I purchased a bottle of 12% pure hydrogen peroxide and submerged them in it (undiluted) over a water bath on the stove for three hours, keeping the temperature of the liquid at 65 °C / 150 °F . After the treatment they came out completely restored, without any trace of the yellowing. I’ve had them in the same spot by the window for three years now and they are still in good condition.

 

Of course, the size of the items is a factor here, as well as the amount of liquid, but keeping them at 65 °C might not be too difficult in a water bath even with larger objects (adding boiling water to the water bath now and then to keep the temperature around 65 °C could be enough).

 

Just thought I'd share my experience for potential improvements or new ideas :)

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I filled my tub from the (very) hot tap in my house before adding the hydrogen peroxide and that certainly seemed to speed the reaction.

 

Subsequent items at a much lower temperature 34 degrees C seem to be going a lot slower - the fishtank heater only goes to 34!

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