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Modern PSU for the SE/30


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@Crutch Did you measure voltage levels (specifically, the 5V line) at the Floppy connector and at your internal HDD power connector when you had your Turbo040 inside?  I ask because in my experience, prior to my epic blunder which caused my Turbo040 to stop working, I would only get freezes with the Turbo040 when there were software incompatibles.  That's a lot of software that just locks up with an 040 but which works fine with an 030 processor.

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On 2/8/2019 at 12:46 PM, ants said:

@Crutch your solution of wiring the soft power of the Seasonic to the original switch is very elegant - I wish I had of read your post in more detail before I did my upgrade!

That is how I wired mine as well. The only downside though is I'm still hesitant to leave the computer plugged in when I'm not using it. If I had wired the PSU AC power to the physical switch I probably wouldn't think anything of it as turning the Mac off would mean it's off, full stop. 

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38 minutes ago, superjer2000 said:

...If I had wired the PSU AC power to the physical switch I probably wouldn't think anything of it as turning the Mac off would mean it's off, full stop. 

That's how I have my SEASONIC wired.  When the mechanical switch is flipped OFF, the PSU is 100% OFF and has no possibility of ever going ON.  I didn't think anything negative about doing it that way since that is basically how the stock PSU works.

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There's definitely pros and cons of both methods. I think for a novice like me, wiring the soft power would have been easier and less scary. I guess I'm just paranoid!

 

Although I was wondering how hard it would be to get the soft power running to the power key on the keyboard?!?

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  • 6 months later...

The closeups of my Seasonic PSU ATX connector in my earlier post on this topic (Nov 25 2018) may give you what you want.  The colors are ATX standard: yellow = +12v, red = +5v, black = common, green = PS/ON, blue = -12v.  Of course it’s also very easy to just power the thing up and test each pin with a meter to make absolutely certain (this is what I did...).  Also see this helpful link from Von: http://bylenga.ddns.net/index.php?page=SE_ATX.php 

 

 

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6 hours ago, Overlord said:

For a fee, would someone be willing to wire up one of these for me?

If I lived in the US, I will would be more than happy to do it, but since I live in Japan the 2-way shipping cost would be cost prohibitive.  But since many of our forum members live in the US, I have no doubt that someone will probably stand up and offer to do the job. 

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  • 2 months later...

Just curious, does anyone know just how much current is being drawn on the -12V rail of the Mac SE (or SE/30)? The original PSU is rated 0.5A which is not a lot, whereas something like a picoatx is 0.1A generally. I can probably measure this on my own using a Mac SE but I don't have an SE/30 at all. 

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  • 10 months later...

Bringing this great thread back from the dead as I'm trying to resolve some PSU issues with my SE/30s the lazy way by swapping them out for SSP-300SUBs (apparently the new equivalent to the SSP-250 discussed here).

 

@Crutch you mentioned you drilled and tapped holes for standoffs to support the Seasonic PCBA in the original Astec housing's sheet metal. I was planning on doing this, but wondered if you needed to do anything to get enough material for the threads to bite. Often I think tapped sheet metal holes are preformed with a mandrel before tapping so that the threaded part ends up being greater than just the sheet metal thickness, if that makes sense. See any of the original tapped holes in the housing for an example. It's possible that undersizing the holes and forcing the tap in will deform the sheet metal in the right way, but I figure I'd ask and see if you ran into any issues doing that by hand.

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@ttb that wasn’t really an issue as I recall. I think the screws actually did “bite” fine, but if they didn’t it would be ok since they were screwed into standoffs on the other side, which held the PSU board in place with nuts on the far end. So, the pressure of the screw screwed into the standoff would hold things in place even if the drilled hole was slightly “loose” on the screw. 

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Oh, of course. I was thinking of the male-female ones that I @joethezombie used earlier in the thread. It sounds like you used female-female standoffs or maybe had it with the male end fastening the PCB? Anyway, I ended up using male-male M2.5 standoffs with screws on both sides:

 

IMG_1588.thumb.jpeg.b329b6ac2daaafccc24ecf242e876c19.jpeg

IMG_1589.thumb.jpeg.b99965076e289581698cc958eeef16a4.jpeg

 

Finished product (I just pulled all the pins out of the 26-position receptacle, crimped pins on a used SE power supply cable, and put them in the appropriate positions):

 

IMG_1587.thumb.jpeg.fd88694e2a8cf4dd0eb76660005e7f8a.jpeg

 

The good news is that this successfully resolved my accelerator issues so now I've finally run out of things to fix on my SE/30s :)

 

EDIT:

 

Might be helpful for the next folks, this was what I measured for a pinout on my SSP-300SUB. Pin numbers are top and bottom rows, 0 values are GND and PW shorted to GND for power enable.

 

image.png.5e63ff02e275069e31bc9cff45cc6996.png

Edited by ttb
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On 10/19/2020 at 9:00 AM, ttb said:

I've finally run out of things to fix on my SE/30s :)

In my experience, there's always something to work on.  For example, have you recapped your SE/30's floppy drive, mouse and keyboard?  :-)

 

By the way, what price did you pay for your higher end SEASONIC?

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Too funny. Speaking of floppy drives, I realize one of them does need to be cleaned, so there is always that. I’ve got a few Color Classics that need attention, too :) 

 

I picked up two SSP-300SUBs from Newegg for $63 USD each: https://www.newegg.com/seasonic-flex-sub-ssp-300sub-300w/p/N82E16817151212?item=N82E16817151212
 

I couldn’t find anything cheaper than that in the US for either the -250 or -300. 

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