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Networking a Powerbook Duo: serial -> OS X/unix -> internet


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Thanks! I will have a go at this!

 

 

If you have Linux with AF_APPLETALK stack enabled then pppd should help you out.

 

 

How would I know if I have the stack installed? Does netatalk have this?

 

I would need help figuring out what I need in the pppd command. This is what I have that can probably help: Connecting with the internal modem on the iMac G3, internet is connected through the Ethernet port (IP is 192.168.0.174), speed is 38400 baud. Once I get this working I will post a tutorial somewhere.

 

 

 

EDIT: Well I got ARA 3.1... It will only work with 8.1 or higher. I cannot find ARA 3.0, only updaters. I can't seem to find it on the kdx server as well (It might be there, I just can't find anything!). If I just had a Mac with a PCI or Comm slot that I could shove an ethernet card and localtalk bridge onto...

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How would I know if I have the stack installed? Does netatalk have this?

 

Not sure how pppd and netatalk play together, you may or may not need netatalk, I've never done this myself. The AF_APPLETALK enabling is part of the Linux kernel.

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The AF_APPLETALK enabling is part of the Linux kernel.

 

Okay, I searched for information about this and I came up with this:

 

8.2 Appletalk (AF_APPLETALK)

 

The Appletalk support has no special device names as it uses existing network devices.

 

Kernel Compile Options:

 

Networking options --->

<*> Appletalk DDP

 

 

Appletalk support allows your Linux machine to interwork with Apple networks. An important use for this is to share resources such as printers and disks between both your Linux and Apple computers. Additional software is required, this is called netatalk. Wesley Craig netatalk@umich.edu represents a team called the `Research Systems Unix Group' at the University of Michigan and they have produced the netatalk package which provides software that implements the Appletalk protocol stack and some useful utilities. The netatalk package will either have been supplied with your Linux distribution, or you will have to ftp it from its home site at the University of Michigan

 

It appears that netatalk is needed.

 

UPDATE: I probably know why I can't get it connected, Linux might not have the modem init string... Maybe, but does anyone know the modem in the iMac G3 350 MHz and where to configure the modem string or add it in the command?

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Slightly OT but I just had a thought.

 

Let's say you have a Duo 2300 motherboard, and use a SCSI internal disk, leaving the IDE header free. (Yes, it's been shown that you can use both at the same time). Then attach a 2.5" IDE to CF adapter.

 

Let's say also that you can find a Compact Flash format WiFI card that has the same chipset as a PCMCIA WiFI card that's known to be usable under OS 9.x and/or earlier (like the Proxim/Lucent/Avaya Orinoco).

 

Trick the installer to put the appropriate drivers on the Duo's hard drive. (ie using SCSI Disk Mode from a 1400 or other Powerbook with a PCMCIA slot)

 

Does it seem even remotely possible that the CF card would be recognised?

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I just want to get TCP/IP on there for FTP, IRC, and basic web. What I think is happening is that there is no init string on the iMac.

 

And remind me again why you're trying to do this through two modems sans phone line? Can't you connect the powerbook to the linux box via a null modem cable on the serial ports?

 

equant

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Pardon the thread necromancy, but is there any compelling reason that would prevent jcassara's original solution from working over a wireless serial adapter? For example, the following unit, to a Bluetooth-equipped Mac:

 

Bluetooth SMD Module - Roving Networks

This Bluetooth module is designed to replace serial cables. The Bluetooth® stack is completely encapsulated. The end user just sees serial characters being transmitted back and forth.

 

Features {selected}:

 

* Fully configurable UART

* UART Data rates up to 3Mbps

* Over air data rate of 721kbps to 2.0Mbps

* Compatible with all Bluetooth® products that support SPP (almost all do)

* Includes support for BCSP, DUN, LAN, GAP SDP, RFCOMM, and L2CAP protocols

 

Then it hit me -- I have a UNIX based machine sitting in front of me. One that surely has a PPP daemon. / Would you believe it worked right out of the box?

 

I am now cruising the internet, telnetting, FTPing, and other wonderful things on the Powerbook Duo 280, courtesy my own private non-dial-up dial-up ISP.

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Why not? The unit above is designed for industrial and embedded applications. It appears to the host as a standard serial connection. As far as the OS is concerned, there is no "Bluetooth", just a serial port that goes ... somewhere. jcassara's ppp setup takes care of the rest - provided a serial tty can be opened on the receiving Bluetooth Mac.

 

At least that's how I read it.

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Hey everyone, I've been trying to follow along with this thread with no luck :(

 

I'm trying to hook up my PowerBook 180c to an intel Mac-Mini with 10.6 to no avail... I have a USB-to-Serial adapter that is recognized by the system, but I'm not sure what to do in order to connect the two.

 

The only network-related programs I have available on the PB is the standard MacTCP and TCP/IP control panels. I have no way of transferring any files to the PB unless I get this working.

 

Any ideas?

 

Thanks

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Hey everyone, I've been trying to follow along with this thread with no luck :(

I'm trying to hook up my PowerBook 180c to an intel Mac-Mini with 10.6 to no avail... I have a USB-to-Serial adapter that is recognized by the system, but I'm not sure what to do in order to connect the two.

The only network-related programs I have available on the PB is the standard MacTCP and TCP/IP control panels. I have no way of transferring any files to the PB unless I get this working.

 

Any ideas?

 

Thanks

 

Do you have a terminal program of some sort (MacTerminal, Microphone, ZTerm, anything that uses the Apple communications tool box) for the PB? You need to get MacPPP on your PB if you want TCP/IP access, or a terminal program if you just want to transfer files without using disks.

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a question

 

Do you have a terminal program of some sort (MacTerminal, Microphone, ZTerm, anything that uses the Apple communications tool box) for the PB? You need to get MacPPP on your PB if you want TCP/IP access, or a terminal program if you just want to transfer files without using disks.

 

I have both ZTerm, MacPPP and FreePPP on my PB, and I've been trying to follow the steps on the first post as closely as possible.

The only problem I'm having really is with step 3.. I'm kind of a noob when it comes to networking so I'm not sure how to setup the DNS.

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Does it seem even remotely possible that the CF card would be recognised?

 

I would have thought IDE devices were driven in a very different way to PCMCIA.

 

IDE (ATAPI) are basically storage devices, end of story.

 

Actually, the very original PCMCIA memory cards were descended from micro-card ATA memory cards with the pins and form factor that later became PCMCIA. When PCMCIA became a standard (and later became "PC Card", which evolved into "CardBus",) they kept the old ATA compatibility.

 

And Compact Flash cards are just reduced-size PCMCIA flash cards. And thus, retain 100% ATA compatibility.

 

That's why a Compact Flash-to-IDE converter is just a simple wire converter, with no active controller chip.

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I have both ZTerm, MacPPP and FreePPP on my PB, and I've been trying to follow the steps on the first post as closely as possible.

The only problem I'm having really is with step 3.. I'm kind of a noob when it comes to networking so I'm not sure how to setup the DNS.

 

Don't worry about the DNS for now. Typically, the ppp server on Mac OS X will forward the DNS requests for you. I have used a similar setup before and have never had to specify a dns server in either the MacTCP control panel or in the /etc/ppp/options file on Mac OS X.

 

Here is a post that will give you more specifics on getting the terminal connection running. Once you do that, it is easy to get ppp running using the terminal in FreePPP or MacPPP.

http://68kmla.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=11335&start=25#p117254

 

Using that way you won't have to manually type in the long pppd command every time you want to log in.

 

--Eric

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