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aplmak

Connor Mac Portable 3045 40MB Drives

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Ok so I have 3 working drives.. I de-gooed them and sealed them with some good silicone adhesive. They are in perfect shape. The problem is the boards... I've got a pile of connor hdd boards that are bad... I assume it was during when people tried to fire them up while capacitors were leaking everywhere and it did something to a chip on the hdd boards. If I swap boards from a good unit it they power up and run just perfectly fine. If I only knew what to fix on this pile of bad connor CP-3045 hard drive controller boards........

IMG_0869.jpg

Edited by aplmak

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I think those fail for the same reasons the PC on the IDE versions of these drives do. One of the machines I am very fond of is the Compaq SLT/286, which uses the IDE version of this drive.

 

The reason the PCB fails in the IDE versions is the foam insulation between the PCB and the drive frame degrades, causing the PCB to short-out to the metal drive body, rendering the completely non-functional. To this day I have still never fixed one after that has happened. I replaced the foam on my working drives with a piece of thick, rigid paper, and they have continued to work so far.

 

This is likely the reason these 3045s are failing too, so I’d remove the PCB from your working ones, dig that old foam off, and replace it with a piece of thick paper (or you could use foam again if you could find the right thickness).

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Hmmmm I have several drives with absolutely no foam. And are working normal. Aren’t the metal standoff’s long enough to clear the bottom of the drive?? I’ll have to check that out.. 

 

The other question about fixing the goo is a lot of patience and to be very careful. As long as the goo hasn’t hit the heads or the platters yet. I use a qtip and go around and around the edging.. and then use qtips with 90% alcohol to thoroughly clean. There are two tricky spots where you get close to the platter. Also if you have a drive with black head bumpers that has to be removed and thrown out. You can only use the ones with the clear bumpers. I’ve also seen where the goo or chemical reaction lifts the coating off the magnets for the heads and flakes.. it will stop the head from moving.. and you certainly don’t want flakes flying around inside. Not all can be saved but some can!! I keep bad ones for parts like the bumpers or boards. Everyone can say replace it with SSD... but some collectors like original parts. 

 

Of course dont forget to clean the cover edges.. and remove the little filter if it’s got goo in it.. and finally silicone it carefully back together after you have tested it.

Edited by aplmak

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On 6/25/2020 at 6:31 PM, PB145B said:

I think those fail for the same reasons the PC on the IDE versions of these drives do. One of the machines I am very fond of is the Compaq SLT/286, which uses the IDE version of this drive.

 

The reason the PCB fails in the IDE versions is the foam insulation between the PCB and the drive frame degrades, causing the PCB to short-out to the metal drive body, rendering the completely non-functional. To this day I have still never fixed one after that has happened. I replaced the foam on my working drives with a piece of thick, rigid paper, and they have continued to work so far.

 

This is likely the reason these 3045s are failing too, so I’d remove the PCB from your working ones, dig that old foam off, and replace it with a piece of thick paper (or you could use foam again if you could find the right thickness).

I’ve used a paint brush and the foam just comes right off easily.. 

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8 hours ago, aplmak said:

Aren’t the metal standoff’s long enough to clear the bottom of the drive?? I’ll have to check that out.. 

Not entirely. There are several areas where the circuit board can make contact with with drive body. That foam is there for a reason. 
 

I remember on the first replacement I got for a CP-3041 IDE drive, I installed it (with no insulation), sparked and fried instantly. Second one, used some thick paper, been working ever since.

 

It’s likely the raised area where the spindle mounts that’s contacting the circuit board. 
 

They even started putting a piece of paper along with the foam on the newer revisions of these Conners, so they must have felt the foam itself wasn’t quite sufficient.

Edited by PB145B

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Ok so here’s some photos.. the three drives work I just need working boards.. 

 

And also the silicone seal I use when they are all cleaned.. also is a picture of a bad head magnet! The black bumpers always turn gooey and sticky.. you can also see the magnets flaking..

518AD47A-55F8-4F92-8997-5F7EAC0A69CD.jpeg

261C98EC-8D61-4B39-B23F-29763FABEDB4.jpeg

37E9262F-A47D-4E72-BF04-55A83EF7C6F4.jpeg

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9 hours ago, PB145B said:

Not entirely. There are several areas where the circuit board can make contact with with drive body. That foam is there for a reason. 
 

I remember on the first replacement I got for a CP-3041 IDE drive, I installed it (with no insulation), sparked and fried instantly. Second one, used some thick paper, been working ever since.

 

It’s likely the raised area where the spindle mounts that’s contacting the circuit board. 
 

They even started putting a piece of paper along with the foam on the newer revisions of these Conners, so they must have felt the foam itself wasn’t quite sufficient.

I’m just surprised.. because even when that foam was new I can’t see a solder lead not piercing through it.. now if it was plastic that would make sense.

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8 hours ago, aplmak said:

I’m just surprised.. because even when that foam was new I can’t see a solder lead not piercing through it.. now if it was plastic that would make sense.

It’s what a lot of hard drive manufacturers used for PCB insulation, so I guess it’s fairly effective (when it’s not rotten).

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