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Bendix

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Northern Germany
  • Interests
    old computers, outdoor activities, guitar playing, song writing, cats and dogs

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  1. Bendix

    My screen is blue (Radius Pivot SE/30)

    If you look at this post of bigmessowires‘ and his following one in the same thread, you will find that he was stuck with the 1152 resolution at a time and finally solved this with a) the right drivers and b) grounding the right sense pins of his card. So I thought the same should be possible with the pivot SE 30 card, too. Bolle has posted here, which pins are sense pins (4+7), so grounding those would mean connecting them together and then to for example pin 1? And which software would we need?
  2. Bendix

    My screen is blue (Radius Pivot SE/30)

    Well, I think the original resolution of the radius pivot SE 30 grayscale is 640x864/864x640. The Eizo Flexscan L885 in the pic has a native resolution of 1600x1200 px.
  3. Bendix

    My screen is blue (Radius Pivot SE/30)

    But no matter which dip switches I choose on my vga adapter, I always end up with a resolution of 1152x864 like Bolle. Is that due to a lack of radius drivers or a problem with the vga adapter?
  4. Bendix

    My screen is blue (Radius Pivot SE/30)

    Thank you so much for digging out that old thread! Will browse/read through it more thoroughly in the next couple of days. From what I have read so far I understand that ar least some radius software is needed in order to leave the 1152x640 resolution and get 640x864 or 864x640. Do you have an idea, where I can get that software and which version I would need for my grayscale radius pivot SE 30?
  5. Bendix

    My screen is blue (Radius Pivot SE/30)

    Last night I tested connecting sense0 and sense1 (pin 4 and 7) with no effect at all. So can we conclude, that only connected to an original Radius pivot monitor the monitor can do it's magic during rotation on some sense lines on the card (which we do not know) and there is no way, to simulate this with, say a switch, and all we pivot SE/30 owners have to live with the stretched portrait mode on modern vga tft displays, except for those, who own the HDMI scaler? End of story, hmm?
  6. Bendix

    My screen is blue (Radius Pivot SE/30)

    If this (above) is the pivot SE 30 pinout, then l connecting 4 + 10 like with the Pivot IIsi (below, quoted from the above mentioned WTB: Radius Pivot IIsi cable thread) is obviously nonsense, since with the Radius pivot SE 30 only 4 is sense and 10 is 69hz vsync. But what if I were to connect sense0 and sense1 (pin4 and 7)? Could this lead to the desired permanent landscape mode in the SE 30 pivot?
  7. Bendix

    My screen is blue (Radius Pivot SE/30)

    Forgot two things to mention: That looks absolutely great, Thanks ,Trash80toHP_Mini, for the Scaler Pics! And I did like JT737 did and bought 2 Micron VRAM chips on ebay.de for 6€ (+1,10€ delivery!) and now I enjoy luxurious 4 bit gray scale, an update that Radius charged 150$ for back in those days. For future reference, the name of the chips is Micron MT42C4256Z-7 256Kx4 70ns PZIP-28
  8. Bendix

    My screen is blue (Radius Pivot SE/30)

    Guys, it must be possible to convince the Pivot SE/30 Card, that it is connected to a landscape radius pivot monitor at boot time, i.e. displaying something like 864x640 on VGA. I found these two thread with a Radius Pivot IIsi card, indicating, that connecting pins 4 and 10 on the pivot side might do the trick. @Bolle, what do you think, might this work with our SE 30 cards?
  9. Bendix

    My screen is blue (Radius Pivot SE/30)

    So I did and it worked.
  10. Bendix

    My screen is blue (Radius Pivot SE/30)

    I found another pic of JT737's card on the bay and a pinout of a female db-15 connector. From these two and 9166188's table above I gather, that I have to solder red and green to pin 2 and 5 of the db-15 connector, right?
  11. Bendix

    My screen is blue (Radius Pivot SE/30)

    So in this thread I found a pic provided by 9166188 of the pin situation between DB15 and VGA pinout Bolle described the pinout of the 12 pins on the Radius card and JT737 seems to have connected the missing green and red lines on the card to the female DB 15 on the Radius clamp. But to which pins? And this approach is different from all the posts before, where the blue signal line was connected to the empty red and green pins/lines on the vga cable side. Since radius monitors are very rare I think it would make sense to manipulate the cable from the card to the clamp on the Mac side in a way, that you get a non blue pic with a standard db-15 to vga adapter. I am scared to destroy anything by connecting the wrong lines and would greatly appreciate, if someone could point me into the right direction how to best solve the blue screen problem practically.
  12. Bendix

    My screen is blue (Radius Pivot SE/30)

    JT737, could you pretty pleaaaaase elaborate a little more on the red-green-blue cable hack! After much reading I finally could persuade my Pivot SE/30 to make me blue. How exactly did you connect the cables?
  13. My SE/30 with a recapped logic board makes noise through the speakers, whenever the hard drive is active. It is a kind of scraping and it is loudest right after startup. It disappears after some minutes and might be gone for days. When I do not use the Mac for a couple of weeks, it comes back. The guy, who did the recapping, thinks, that the power supply probably might need a recap. What do you think, any experience is greatly appreciated?
  14. The drive still works, so the fault seems to be fixed for now
  15. I found this on the net a while ago (dunno where) and was able to fix my drive with it: „Larry Pina's books often have procedures for aligning floppy drives without lots of the specialized test equipment that Sony requires for a factory calibration. Try checking your local library for The Dead Mac Scrolls or any flavor of Macintosh Bible that he's published if you want a good walk through. From my memory, the basic procedures (for Sony manual inject only, though it should work on auto inject drives): You'll need a certified good Mac floppy for testing, either factory produced or formatted on a known-good Mac, to use for alignment. Make sure the disk is LOCKED or you will ruin it and/or screw up the alignment process. You will need full access to the drive while it is operating so don't try to do this in situ on a SE or Color Classic; you really should use an LC or II of some sort, better yet if you can fabricate a very long floppy cable so that you can have the drive connected outside of the computer and thus have lots of room to work on the drive. Also, clean the drive first, including the heads, to eliminate dirt as the cause of your problems. This procedure assumes the drive hasn't been damaged and isn't missing pieces. For track-0 alignment (generally only necessary if the drive has been completely disassembled and the drive asks to format every disk): There's a post on the side of the head assembly (an interrupter) on the side opposite of the motor, and it slides into a slot in a black plastic thing (the optical assembly) toward the back of the drive. The interrupter interrupts an optical beam when the head assembly moves into position, and when this happens the drive knows that it is at track 0. To adjust this, mark the current position of the optical assembly, slightly loosen the screws securing the optical sensor assembly, move the assembly slightly forward or back, tighten the screws, and then insert a disk. Repeat the process until the computer attempts to read the disk rather than simply saying it's "not a Macintosh disk." If the head alignment hasn't been bothered, this should be all you need to do as the drive will be properly aligned to track 0 and thus be able to read a good disk. However if the computer has problems reading the disk even after adjusting the setting for track 0, you'll need to adjust the head alignment. For head alignment (for a drive with new heads, that has been completely disassembled, or regularly has problems reading manufactured disks or disks formatted on other computers/other computers can't read disks formatted in this drive): There are two hex screws on either side of the stepper motor that drives the heads. Mark the current orientation of the drive chassis to the stepper motor body. Loosen these screws slightly and turn the motor body slightly one way or the other. Insert a disk and wait for the computer to respond. If it says the disk has problems, eject the disk, twist the drive motor body a little more in that direction, and reinsert the disk until the computer reads it reliably. If it instead says the disk is unreadable, try rotating the drive motor in the other direction until the drive attempts to mount the disk. Usually you would rotate the motor body until the drive starts to read the disk well, mark the position, then keep rotating it until it no longer reads the disk, mark the position again, and then rotate it back to a middle point between where it starts and stops reading the disk properly before tightening the screws. This usually ensures the best drive performance and is as good as it gets without getting into crazy test equipment.“
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