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ian1035nr

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  1. ian1035nr

    Goofy Line on PowerBook 180c Display

    Washing out is the symptom I usually see when an LCD has bad caps. I guess in those cases they take a while to store a full charge. I ordered new caps along with a good soldering iron/hot air station combo. I've been making do with a large, ancient soldering iron for years but that's simply not going to cut it for these tight quarters.
  2. ian1035nr

    Goofy Line on PowerBook 180c Display

    Just realized that those look nothing like rectangular, surface mount, electrolytic capacitors. And whoever had a 180c with gap goo in the cables likely had the laptop stored on its side, letting gravity slowly pull expelled electrolyte from the other side of the board into the cables. The fact that it took me so long to realize that is sad. I knew I was dumb/out of it, but I didn't realize the situation was this dire. That makes my life easier, just going to grab the appropriate caps and get this thing fixed. I just found a Reddit post of someone with exactly the same same problem as my unit, someone in the comments apparently had the same issue and fixed it by replacing the electrolytic caps on the back of the board, so I'm hopeful.
  3. ian1035nr

    Goofy Line on PowerBook 180c Display

    Sutekh, you are an absolute legend. Thank you so much! One last question: There's these capacitors here that I've "circled" in red. Are these something I need to replace as well? I'm worried about them because they're running right next to the delicate ribbon cables
  4. ian1035nr

    Goofy Line on PowerBook 180c Display

    Yes, that's it exactly, it's an active matrix panel that's acting like a passive matrix panel I was trying to think where I've seen that kind of look before; it's been so long since I've used a passive matrix panel that I've practically forgotten what it's like! Last time I had used a PowerBook with a passive matrix screen was a 150 I had repaired for someone back in 2010. A visual inspection of the display cable doesn't show any obvious tears or breaks, but I'm wondering if some cap goo might have gotten into the array of short cables that run from the screen itself to the control board. Any references I've seen to this phenomena resulted in the traces being eaten away and the screen having lines that were just missing, so hopefully I got to this before anything got under the cables. Only problem now is finding out what caps are on the board. I had posted about it a while ago, but the only concrete I answer I got was as follows: 47 uF 16 Vx 4 10 uF 16 V x2 10 uF 25 V x2 The rub is that my screen has 7 caps in total at that end of the board, not 8, but there also wasn't any indication as to where those caps actually go. And the ones on there right now don't have any markings to aid in identification. If only the 180c had been more popular, either during it's actual production run on in recent years with collectors. Other models have lists of the exact caps people bought from mouser/digikey. But oh well, c'est-la-vie, I chose to go after one of the (if THE least) popular model in the 1xx series of PowerBooks. Only thing left to do is work around the obscurity
  5. ian1035nr

    Goofy Line on PowerBook 180c Display

    That’s exactly what I was thinking. Any damaged display cables I’ve seen resulted in very different forms of visual artifacting compared to what I’m seeing on the 180c Thanks for chiming in, makes me feel better. I wasn’t keen on trying to find a display cable; 180c specific parts like that aren’t easy to come by
  6. Howdy, everyone. I’ve been working on a PowerBook 180c and I’m about to tackle the part I’ve been looking the least forward to: recapping the LCD Before I get into it, I’d like to get some confirmation is these lines are likely caused by faulty capacitors/damage from cap goo Anything colour that’s adjacent to a window is coloured darker than its supposed to be, and these bands extend from one edge of the screen to the other, and they only happen where there’s the edge of a window with very light contents. I had found a post elsewhere with a similar-looking problem, but someone said it looked more like an issue with the display cable. The capacitors are getting changed regardless, but I’d just like an opinion on whether or not In should start searching for a replacement display cable
  7. ian1035nr

    PowerBook 180c That’s Picky with RAM

    Good to know mine isn’t the only unit that prefers lopsided 10mb modules. I’m tempted to bend the pins a bit as suggested by sutekh, but my hands aren’t all that steady anymore, and I don’t have a spare upper motherboard in case things go sour. Oh well, it’s fine as is for my own use
  8. ian1035nr

    PowerBook 180c That’s Picky with RAM

    So apparently I posted too soon. I was fiddling with the 10mb module and found that the PowerBook would POST successfully if the module is held at a very specific angle, a tilt of about 10 degrees. I placed a folded up business card between the top case and the module to act as a shim, and everything’s fine now. I don’t know why it’s like that with only this one specific RAM module, but I’m not about to look a gift horse in the mouth; this is good enough for me. I did notice a bit more friction when putting the 6mb RAM module back in my 170; I wonder if the 10mb’s connector wasn’t really manufactured to proper spec. Who knows, I sure don’t.
  9. Howdy everyone, I have a PowerBook 180c that isn’t cooperating with a 10 megabyte RAM module I have. I plugged the module into my PowerBook 170, and it works perfectly. System 7.6 boots fully, and I ran it like that for a while and it never gave any trouble. The 180c however, refuses to cooperate. It shows a gray screen, plays the death chime, and doesn’t do anything else. It works absolutely fine with a 6 megabyte module I have, along with some 2 and 4 megabyte modules. It’s just this one 10mb part that doesn’t work with it. The 10mb stick in question came from another 180c that was working (I bought it 13 years ago, and it had problems with the interconnect cable, it’s long gone now so I can’t try it with this stick), so it’s absolutely, 100% compatible with the 180c I just can’t figure out what the problem is. I tried the obvious things like cleaning the socket on the motherboard and the connector on the RAM, I made sure it was fully inserted. I’m stumped. If anyone has any other options, I’ll try anything
  10. ian1035nr

    PowerBook 180c Capacitor Map

    Thanks for the replies, guys. Looks like I'll have to do some fussing around to figure out what goes where. I'll grab a few capacitors for the 165 and see how they compare to what's in the 180c. The I've found a few pictures of the screen's PCB, and it's definitely a lot more crowded than its passive matrix siblings, no surprises there. It's definitely something I won't be tackling for a little bit, I want to have the time and room to do it carefully, so that just gives me more time to try and dredge up more information from anyone who's recapped this screen. I should also recap my 170 at some point. I keep checking the screen for evidence of leakage, and nothing yet. I doesn't even have the "tunnel vision" issue that plagues so many B&W active matrix PowerBooks, I can run this thing for hours no problem. But my luck can't hold out forever. Sooner or later, those caps need to be replaced.
  11. ian1035nr

    PowerBook 180c Capacitor Map

    Howdy, everyone I found a machine I've been wanting for a very, VERY long time: A PowerBook 180c. I bought a used one back in 2006, before I started high school. But the screen almost immediately stopped working. I've been waiting for a decent price on another one ever since, and one popped on eBay last week, so that was an insta-buy. It hasn't gotten to me yet, I'm hoping it comes in the post in time for the weekend. The last thing I want is for the screen or logic board to get damaged by old, leaky capacitors, so I'm planning to recap the whole thing. Does anyone have a map, or even a list of which capacitors I'll need to do the job?
  12. ian1035nr

    PowerBook 14x or 170, 180 Battery NiMH recell

    That’s sensible, especially if you don’t plan on using it untethered too frequently. I bought a 3rd party battery back in 2011 that used 10 NiMh cells. When that one died, I just bought identical cells and copied their layout. The cost was about $80 Canadian. Definitely pricey, but I still use my 170 on the go a lot. I wouldn’t have invested that kind of money if I didn’t have that aftermarket battery to show how to build something similar in performance to the original battery. I used the PowerBook to play music and transfer files over serial while I was at work last night, and it was still going strong after 3 hours, so at least I’m getting my money’s worth out of it. Too bad there aren’t any companies making 1xx series batteries anymore, it would make our lives a lot easier.
  13. ian1035nr

    PowerBook 14x or 170, 180 Battery NiMH recell

    I'll be honest, I have no idea how to modify the system's power meter. But would you mind sharing which cells you used and how you wired them up? I just recelled my PowerBook 170's battery last week with NiMh cells, and the power meter seems to work okay, I don't get any warning chimes until I've used the machine for about 2 hours or so. Mine has 10 1.2V cells in total, but they're divided into 2 banks of 5 cells, so that might send out a more constant voltage?
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