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    • LOL! I have an LC case with an LC II Logic Board in it, and a LC II with a LC Logic board in it. I managed to get these systems separately and months apart, so they were not from the same seller. It just happened to happen that way. I could switch the boards around to get them into their appropriate cases but for now I have not.   But as stated, the LC Logic board need that plastic piece with the fan and speaker on it, and it is there inside the LC II Case.
    • Heh. I wouldn't mind one myself. My Power Mac 6100/66 has a Sonnet G3 250 MHz installed (not quite as fancy, but still much faster than stock).
    • In my basement, along with the 2.6 you were looking for. I will try to see if I remember how to make images of them. Send me a message with an email address and I will try to get them to you.
    • IDK about the LCI/II/III as I never got the card I have working on my LCII beyond maybe installing the drivers and a green light of some sort.   But I will note that I had similar trouble with my Power Mac 6100/66 not playing nice with a more modern 10/100 Mbps (Fast Ethernet) switch or hub, whereas interposing a 10 Mbps hub in between it and more modern hardware solved that problem (probably a similar auto-negotiation/duplex problem).
    • I wouldn't necessary rule out sudden failure of some critical PSU component, these machines are 25 years old after all.   A multimeter is okay for simple voltage, resistance, and continuity checks, but not generally useful for determining if capacitors are dead (at least not while they're in-circuit) or the overall health. IDK if there are any good test points, but it wouldn't be a bad idea to verify that the inputs/outputs of the regulators seem as expected and that where the electricity enters the board the voltage also seem correct. Also capacitors don't have to look bad or be leaking to be dead/out of spec, or at least that's my understanding.   Does it matter whether you leave the battery out or not?   P.S. I really doubt it matters here, but compressed air is pretty cold coming out.
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