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SCSI Zip drive

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I used the Zip back when it was common place basically as a quick and dirty sneakernet solution between machines, especially between home and school where floppies werent big enough to hold a full powerpoint presentation, and school newspaper documents. 

 

Then I also used them for quick backing up of machines before formatting, etc... 

 

I feel Flash drives basically are what killed the zip. It was for me anyway. I use USB sticks today like I did Zip back then. 

 

But Zip now is perfect on my old machines. They still make a good sneakernet solution in my environment because I have a USB Zip drive that I have connected to a more modern Mac, and of course I have a Zip module in one of my G3 powerbooks, as well as the SCSI Zip drives on my old compact machines. So its a quick easy way to dump files on there without the whole "chicken and egg" scenario of stuffit... 

Edited by techknight

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I use Zip disks for my old Macs, because a) I have a bunch of them, and B) being a contemporary of many of my Macs, it seems to be more "real" somehow.

 

And also, if you're going to use one as a startup disk, you can format it using the patched version of Apple HD SC Setup, and the system will treat it like a normal hard drive (no auto-eject at every restart, either!) I like formatting my disks this way so I don't have to worry about any compatibility issues with, say, the Plus (disks formatted this way work equally as well on a Plus as any other spinning disk; a disk formatted using Iomega's drivers are known to be tricky to use on a Plus due to limited support).

 

c

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My internal (Pismo) VST zip drive works pretty well. I get >1MB/sec of write speed and I can read/write most disks.

 

I was able to get NTFS-3G/MacFUSE installed under OS X 10.4.11 and can read NTFS formatted disks just fine. Only have a couple...

 

 

I loaded the latest Iomegaware 4.0.2 tools under both OS X and Classic and don't have any issues. I've only seen the "Click of Death" on parallel port units over the years.

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I might have to try the ZIP250 swap idea... That would add some functionality, but, I don't think I have any ZIP250 disks left hanging around. Need to check.

 

My wife had a couple, but, I don't think we left any data on them... moved it to CD-R a while back.

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Zip750 drive can read but not write zip100 media. They can both read and write zip250 media.

 

There's not a particularly good justification to have a 750 anyway, and you can have both drives connected to one system, but there's a migration path if you find a bunch of 750 stuff and want to use that instead of 100, or you're mostly reading archived data off of 100 cartridges.

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Yep, read/no write to 100MB media is what I meant when I said they didn't work fine (in a Zip100/68k environment) with Zip100 media. Zip750 drives are not very useful in that environment.

Edited by Trash80toHP_Mini

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Sure, but perhaps more important than "won't read 100 media" is that the 750 was only available in ide, usb, and firewire variants.

 

Sticking with 100 or 100 with some 250 mechanisms would of course be better for that environment, unless you also had a lot of PPC systems that you needed to sneakernet stuff with, at which point it would probably be worth having 750 mechanisms and media. (Although 750 is different enough, in that it won't write to 100 cartridges, that it could be worth examining whether a syquest, castlewood orb, LS-120, or Jaz system would be better -- of course, you can buy 64-gig flash drives and USB SD card readers and SD media very inexpensively these days, depending on what you're using and what you want to do, that may be just as well.)

 

Kind of unrelated: why bother mentioning 750 at all? Nobody else had for several days. The mentions of 750 made earlier were pretty specifically in the context of what was available and reasonable to use in the early 2000s when data was growing and when having something that had some kind of migration path made sense.

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It was in the context of fancyfreddy's concern (I might have been mistaken) that he didn't have Zip250 media, only Zip100 media while considering the drive swap I suggested he do to bring his VST Zip 100 up to Zip250 status.

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Other than avoiding the click of death by moving off zip100 entirely onto zip250, is there a good reason to upgrade a working 100 module to 250 like that? It's not like this is 1999 and 9 (USCSI) or 10 (IDE) gigs is the biggest we can get  an internal hard disk in from Apple, and so we need it for projects or to offload data.

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I had a ton of SCSI Zip drives that I got from various surplus events, but I passed most of them on to other people...I am down to a couple internal drives, and maybe one or two externals.  I never used them much.  Most of my friends and business acquaintances were/are using Windows and it was not a convenient way to transfer files from my Mac systems.  It was easier to set up an FTP server at my house and transfer stuff that way.

 

I also made a point to have Ethernet cards installed in every machine I have, unless there was a hardware limitation preventing it.  Even extremely slow file transfers over Ethernet are faster than file copies and drive swapping.

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On the usefulness of networking, even slow networking:

 

I've been doing some work transferring files between some PowerBooks (a 180 and a 1400) and I was originally going to try to use the SyQuest EZ-135 drive, but gave that up when I realized that the Internet-faring powerBook is the 1400, and it doesn't have enough disk space to download a lot of stuff, then shutdown/reboot to switch to the EZ135, then copy, then move the whole drive over to the 1400.

 

I ended up connecting the 180 to the 1400 (which has a 30-gig disk, so I don't even need to use the Syquest drive) via a serial cable, and using Ethernet (Micro EN/SC) on the PowerBook 180 to download stuff from my home http server directly to the 1400's drive.

 

It has been an adventure. It's quite slow, but probably less slow than having to take everything down and put it back up. Perhaps the biggest problem is that it would actually be much better for me to get the 6100, 840, or beige G3 out and put it where the 1400 is. Use it as the server, and let both the 1400 and the 180 connect to it in their ways.

 

I have kind of been on an "if only I'd had a superfloppy!" kick of late, but the thing I very much wanted was good networking. That would probably have been more valuable, unless I was able to get a whole raftload of different drives.

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The only machines in my house that are not connected via Ethernet are my LC475 and the two Pluses.  The LC475 has a IIe card installed so no free slot for a network card, but everything I need to do thus far can be accomplished with an external CD drive, floppies, or serial connection.  As functional removable disks (and internal hard drives, for that matter) are becoming more scarce, I have been making a point to weed out flaky drives and cartridges that I know I won't be able to replace easily, and concentrating on more common removable media.

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I've got a cable harness for the AppleDisplayUnit that's braided Power,Video, ADB, 10bT and PhoneNet with Router and Bridge on a four way ADB/Video switchbox leading to the OmniView Mac/PC selector. I haven't hooked up Networking since moving almost seven years ago. SneakerNet/Zip is just soooo much easier for anything I really need to do. Then again, consider the fact that I despise networking. ::)

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Does anyone here know if a 2GB Jaz drive can use 1GB Jaz disks? I finally tested the one I got from a thrift store and it works, but all I can find online are 1GB disks.

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It looks like they can.

 

Update/sidenote: I was reading a review of the Zip250 drive in the April 1999 issue of MacWorld. They generally liked the drive, but they did mention that using a Zip250 drive to manipulate 100MB media is slower by a measurable and perhaps noticeable amount (it was like 10 or 20%) than using a 100MB mechanism to do so.

 

If you have good working Zip100 drives and media, and you don't plan on migrating entirely to 250, then I only personally recommend getting and using a 250 in any primary capacity if you are utterly and direly desperate for a mechanism, and there are no 100s to be found anywhere.

 

Given that much less common drives can be had in spades on eBay, I'm guessing this isn't going to happen.

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