Jump to content

EvilCapitalist

68000
  • Content count

    1177
  • Joined

  • Last visited

1 Follower

About EvilCapitalist

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Northern Virginia

Recent Profile Visitors

330 profile views
  1. EvilCapitalist

    Ricoh chipset PCI to PCMCIA adapter card - possible?

    I have to imagine it wouldn't be terribly expensive to have a new run of CSII risers done. It appears to be just a dumb extender with no logic on the riser itself and there's certainly a market for them given how fast they tend to go if they pop up for sale.
  2. EvilCapitalist

    Ricoh chipset PCI to PCMCIA adapter card - possible?

    I don't think there is one. The Service Source manual essentially just called it a closed system and left it at that, though someone was good enough to do a teardown of their TAM and post it on iFixit. You've got it. The ports bracket on the right side (if you're looking at the back of the machine) supports whatever cards are installed so they don't just flop down and then that bracket is supported by the fat back itself. You can't use either slot (PCI or CSII) without the risers as whatever cards you'd install would hit the sides of the case and won't go in all the way. This is borrowed from that TAM teardown but it shows how the cards are right on top of each other. Here's a side view borrowed from the Mac512 website (which is presently dead): You can see how the ports bracket (the recessed part) holds the PCI/CSII cards and then the whole fat back supports that. The fat back definitely ruins the lines of the machine but without it you're limited to SCSI for expansion, LocalTalk for networking, and you can't install any CPU upgrades.
  3. EvilCapitalist

    Ricoh chipset PCI to PCMCIA adapter card - possible?

    You can see the offsets in both the CSII riser and the PCI riser and why the two slot card from the 64xx/65xx series wouldn't work (pics of those below for comparison), and on a side note, I didn't realize that there was a difference between the 6400 riser and the 6500 riser but there definitely is. 6400 riser 6500 riser
  4. EvilCapitalist

    Ricoh chipset PCI to PCMCIA adapter card - possible?

    Here we go, pics-a-plenty: Comm Slot II riser / PCI riser / PCI riser from a 5500 for comparison Detail of the CSII riser CSII back PCI riser front PCI riser back
  5. EvilCapitalist

    Ricoh chipset PCI to PCMCIA adapter card - possible?

    I think someone here tried using the two slot PCI riser from a 64xx/65xx machine and it worked, but it introduces new problems: - To use the two slot riser the hard drive bracket / cooling fan has to be removed. With the standard riser the installed PCI card is resting on the HD bracket so installing the two slot riser necessitates removing that if you're trying to use the lower PCI slot and then I still think there are clearance issues with the top slot blocking the CSII riser, making you worse off than when you started (single PCI slot, no HD bracket, no CSII) - When the PCI riser has a card installed the weight of the two (PCI riser and PCI card) is supported by the fat back ports bracket and the HD bracket. A two PCI slot riser wouldn't work with that (the offset is wrong) so it would be unsupported and putting a fair amount of stress on the PCI slot on the motherboard - When the whole shebang is installed it's too tall to reinstall the fat back (I think) so you'd have to run with the cover off
  6. EvilCapitalist

    Ricoh chipset PCI to PCMCIA adapter card - possible?

    I've got my TAM out for some testing, I can get pics of both that and the PCI riser tonight.
  7. EvilCapitalist

    Vince's Conquests

    '95 does a whole lot of disk thrashing during the installation when it's trying to detect non Plug and Play hardware though it's only supposed to be ~60 second max.
  8. EvilCapitalist

    PB145B’s finds

    You might be thinking of Chicago build 58, that definitely had a lot of 3.1 in it. Build 73 wasn't much different, and it wasn't until Beta 1 that you could "Start" (heh heh) to see what the finished product would look like. Chalk it up to not having played around with these builds in a long while but I should have suggested build 2257 not 2250. They're much the same but 2257 is a bit more polished and less likely to eat it.
  9. EvilCapitalist

    Vince's Conquests

    There's got to be quite a lot of bloatware on there because '95, even if you get to '95 OSR2.5, doesn't take up all that much space on its own. I ran '95B on a 486DX2/66 that only had a 730MB HD for a good while and never had much trouble with free space.
  10. EvilCapitalist

    PB145B’s finds

    Oh man, Windows betas. That takes me back to my days at the OSBA forum and trying out just about everything I could get my hands on. Since that says it's a 2003 build I'd guess it would be either 4015 or 4029, both of which were pretty stable. I'm definitely more of a fan of the 4xxx builds (pre-reset). Tried 5048 later on and was not impressed, and I continued being not impressed for the rest of the 5xxx builds (just not a fan of Vista overall). As for Whistler builds, try 2250 and 2410. Also, just for the heck of it give Neptune 5111 a go.
  11. EvilCapitalist

    Vince's Conquests

    I seem to recall maybe F4 or F12 getting you into the BIOS. It's been a while since I've mucked with my Presario as it's stored away in another city. Are the drives you're trying set up jumpered as Master/Slave or Cable Select? I know many of the PCs I had of that vintage needed to have drives jumpered specifically as Master or Slave and putting them on Cable Select would have the machine either refuse to boot (hanging on detecting the drives) or would boot with no drives found.
  12. EvilCapitalist

    Vince's Conquests

    Wow, that's quite a conquest! Congrats! The LaserActive with the Genesis/SegaCD units I've seen on eBay tend to go for quite a pretty penny and it is interesting seeing just how many non-Sega devices had a Genesis crammed into them. I had forgotten that Compaq kept making their crazy Presario All-in-ones after the 386/486 versions. Doubly weird that from the front it looks like an actual all-in-one but from the back it's clear that they literally just took a desktop, glued a CRT to it, and called it a day. You even have to plug in the "built in" monitor with a VGA cable no less! Given the build date of July '96 I'm guessing it's a Pentium 166 at best. Still, a cool machine nonetheless. If you still haven't been able to get into the BIOS something I had luck with on my Presario 4840 was to "force" it to give me the option of entering the BIOS by just holding down a bunch of keys on the keyboard at power on so it threw a keyboard error and gave me the prompt to enter the BIOS or continue booting.
  13. EvilCapitalist

    Another Abomination - LC 580 DOS

    That second picture looks exactly like the Quadtel BIOS my Gateway 386 has, which is strange because if I'm not mistaken Phoenix Technologies bought Quadtel. 640x480 is pretty good for a 486 though, especially if you're staying with Windows 3.1 and not going to '95.
  14. EvilCapitalist

    PB145B’s finds

    That they were, and they didn't get any better when they merged with Elitegroup Computer Systems. I've heard they're not as bad today but I will never trust anything that has PCChips or ECS markings anywhere on it. I had a custom built machine that had a PCChips motherboard (M571) and it had some of the absolute strangest quirks I'd ever seen like not supporting RAM it was supposed to support, only recognizing part of a stick of RAM (My 128MB of RAM ended up being between 96 and 112MB depending on the day), random crashes tracing back to the SiS chipset, and a front side bus that wouldn't work reliably at 75MHz (though it was supposed to) but would work at 83MHz (which it wasn't supposed to) but only at certainly multipliers. That was one machine that when it got retired it got recycled instead of being re-used for something else. It was that atrociously bad. Then I had a late model Gateway machine that didn't seem to play nicely with all the Core 2 Duos it was supposed to support, had some strange quirks with what memory it would recognize (only 2.5GB of my 4GBs of RAM being recognized at the BIOS level), and was generally an unstable machine...lo and behold it was an Elitegroup motherboard OEM'd for Gateway. Really a shame what happened to them, they were IMHO one of the best PC vendors until they bought eMachines at which point they started a very quick slide into low end junk which ended when they got bought by Acer (Acer -> Always can expect repair) and finally, thankfully, Acer put the brand out of its misery.
  15. EvilCapitalist

    PB145B’s finds

    Packard Bells weren't too bad as far as name brand PCs went in the early 90s, at least until they got busted putting used parts in machines that were marked as new. This was also around the time their quality started to go downhill (mid-late 90s I want to say). All that being said, I've seen some that were rock solid reliable and I've seen others that could be outdone by a custom built PC using a PCChips motherboard. For $4 though, you got a solid conquest.
×