Jump to content

trag

68030
  • Content Count

    3649
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by trag

  1. Necro thread, but someone might find this question and need the answer... Latest ATI drivers. With the ATI drivers which are installed with the OS 9.2.2 update, QuickTime 6.0.3 will lock up the machine during extension loading. The mouse will move but clicking the mouse and typing on the keyboard will have no effect. The culprit is ATI Video Accelerator 4.8.5. Update to 4.8.7 by installing the January 2005 ATI OS 9 Mac Software Update. If you have an nVidia card, this probably isn't a problem. This experience occurred with a Radeon 9000.
  2. Some of the Atmel (now Microchip) ATF15xx family are also still available in 5V. https://www.microchip.com/design-centers/programmable-logic/spld-cpld/cpld-atf15xx-family
  3. trag

    Solid State Drive for G3?

    Just to nitpick a bit. Not supported on **built-in** IDE. No such limitation with PCI-PATA/SATA cards.
  4. trag

    Solid State Drive for G3?

    I have a lot of those (senior moments)....
  5. I sell a set for the IIci for $10. There are a few IIci's out there with 11 47uF caps instead of 8, so you should check your board. They're pretty rare though.
  6. trag

    Solid State Drive for G3?

    I think the Beige G3 only has three RAM slots... Max RAM is 768MB; 3X 256MB.
  7. trag

    FPGA Mac

    I must not looked at specific models of Spartan 6 in my post a while back. The LX100 or LX150 cost between $120 and $200 at Digikey, just for the chip. I had to be looking at the smaller versions when I saw prices between $30 and $80.
  8. trag

    FPGA Mac

    Having thought it over last night, I think the Pano is a good option if you want a Spartan 6 (G2) or Spartan 3 (G1) development board. Much cheaper than paying Xilinx or a third party the hundreds of dollars a development board costs. Also, much less well documented, though. I doubt development could be done fast enough to make basing a new product on surplus Panos a good idea. Anyone looking for one, note that there's a G2 model and a G1 model, but Rev. C of both models. The G2 has a Spartan 6. Externally (according to the documentation linked to here) it has a DVI connector. The G1 has a Spartan 3. Externally, it has a VGA connector. The Spartan 6, in addition to being a larger FPGA, has built-in DDR2 controllers. The Spartan 3 does not have built-in DDR2 controllers. They must be instantiated out of available logic (thus shrinking available FPGA space) using the MIG tool from Xilinx (or roll your own, heh). Looking at Ebay, most of the largish lots right now seem to be made of G1s.
  9. trag

    FPGA Mac

    I started looking at some of the old documentation I collected back when and at the Pano Github page you referenced for the reverse engineering work.. I was looking at Spartan 3 family back when. More recently I took a brief look at what I think they're replacing Spartan 3 with, as hte affordable less powerful but still pretty powerful line. Anyway, it's a rabbit hole. I'm not going in there. I did find that the Memory Interface Generator is the Xilinx tool to use. One gives it parameters and it generates the required memory controller, at least, according to "InterfacingXilinxFPGAwithMicronDDR.pdf". Not sure where I downloaded it. Also, that may be for FPGAs without a built-in dedicated hardware. It sounds like the Spartan 6 has four dedicated DDR2 controllers built in and two of them are used by the Pano. IIRC, some chips only pin out two of them. So, the MIG might be the thing to use. But with the on-chip dedicated controller, it might not. I guess when I wrote my earlier post, I was thinking in terms of someone who programmed a custom DDR2 interface at the assembly language level for 8 years and debugged it on new development boards. I was just kind of assuming the folks working on the Pano would have someone with that level of experience. Then you mentioned that you were just starting to look at it, and that put things in perspective. It's not trivial to get DDR2 working. I shouldn't have called it that. The interface from the DDR2 controller cell to whatever larger computer they're building should be relatively trivial (compared to designing a computer) but even when one has a pre-built IP package for the controller, there can still be a dizzying array of timing parameters and such to configure in registers to actually make the interface work in practice. One of the programs I wrote for our custom chip walked through the settings for the timing parameters to the DDR2 chips and tested where they worked and where they didn't to find the "window" of parameters where the DDR2 actually functioned. Then it reported back the parameters for the center of the window and set the internal registers to those center values. Some IP has that initialization routine included in the hardware. Most that I've seen don't and expect the end user to have some kind of initialization on boot routine to find the data eye. In practice, once you've found it for a particular piece of hardware, it seems to stay put. So one could probably get away with just finding the working timing parameters once. But all that said: If the FPGA is wired to the DDR2 chip properly, it should be relatively easy for someone familiar with DDR2 to get it working. The controller doesn't even need to be instantiated, because it's built into the FPGA as an immutable cell. Ah, read a bit of the "Hacker News" link from the OP and someone did get the DDR working with about 9 hours of work, they reported. Dug in a little deeper. Most of the quantity on Ebay seems to be the G1 with Spartan 3 rather than the G2 with Spartan 6. Spartan 6 on Digikey, if it was available would be $30 - $60. They have one model available right now for $85. I didn't check any other sources. I've been wrestling with the age old question, "Should I stock up because I might want some, someday." Which, for me, is a foolish bet. I should just say no. The FPGA on those systems is nice, but it's not a $400 Virtex. It's a $50 - $100 (tops) Spartan. It does have the advantage of already being soldered to a board and including a DDR2 chip and video output chip. But it's not such a wondrous deal that I can't pass it up.
  10. trag

    iPod 1G repair attempt

    Sorry for the distraction. You'd think there'd be someone who had worked on the scroll wheel.
  11. trag

    Fun with colour on my SE/30

    Interesting. Thank you for indulging my curiosity and for the link to the 7053.
  12. trag

    FPGA Mac

    They may have pulled it, but Xilinx used to have a configurable DDR2 controller cell included with their free stuff, IIRC. There definitely was such IP, my only hesitation is regarding the memory that it was available in the free distribution. It's been years since I looked at it. Their new line of "budget" chips have dedicated DDR2 controllers built-in which are limited to 16 bit width and there are pre-written cells for those available. I don't know if they pulled the old configurable IP when they added the dedicated stuff. The nice thing about the configurable version was you could set it up for anything from a single X4 DDR2 chip up to a 64 bit wide DIMM. Anyway, it would take a little HDL to add in such an auto-generated cell, but if you're already laying out a ocmputer of some type, adding an auto-generated DDR2 controller should be trivial. I guess I should take a look at the documentation you linked and see what's going on. But commenting from this armchair is so much more comfortable. I appreciate the info in your other comments.
  13. trag

    iPod 1G repair attempt

    There are 44 pin ATA to almost everything adapters available. I like MSATA myself, over CF. The newer M2 might be a better choice now.
  14. trag

    Fun with colour on my SE/30

    Have you tried it with just the UniMacfly adapter?
  15. trag

    iPod 1G repair attempt

    If the 1st gen is the one with the LIF/PATA connector for the tiny 1.8" LIF hard drives, then folks have used a LIF to MSATA adapter to install MSATA storage on the things. Or was that the fifth generation? Appears so from this listing (240 GB hard drive with the PATA LIF interface): https://ebay.us/JADUYR
  16. trag

    FPGA Mac

    I would be hesitant to try to develop on a discontinued FPGA. Is the Spartan 6 still in production? The reason being that tool support disappears. Reading about the gymnastics the blogger went through to get the tools working sounds like a pain. On the other hand, much of that effort could probably have been avoided, if he weren't committed to avoiding running Windows. It can be hard enough to get the development environment working for supported FPGAs. Obsolete ones may be a bargain, but they can make development problematical. On the other hand, I'm more of a hardware guy than a software guy, so all that Unix'y manipulation he did doesn't come naturally to me. Anyone know if the Pano Logic G2 has available I/O pins on that Spartan 6 that aren't being used? If one wanted to add things like serial ports, ADB ports, floppy port, or SCSI, there's no way to do that on that system short of USB adapters, unless there are unused I/O pins on the FPGA that can be accessed. I'm surprised someone hasn't sussed out the connections to auxiliary chips. Should just be a matter of killing a board by removing the chips and then tracing the pin connections, unless the auxiliary chips are not marked and are unidentifiable.
  17. So did any software use them? I remember purchasing a PAS16 way back when because it was very cheap. It came with a free copy of "Out of This World" which claimed it would make use of the PAS16 if present. The sale was so good, it was actually a pretty good way to get the game... I don't recall being able to tell any meaningful difference in the game's sound, though.
  18. trag

    how to remove cpu from Quadra 840 AV

    I use the long edge of a metal PCI slot cover. The 68040 is held in the socket by friction. It often pops loose quite suddenly. So, you start applying enough force to get it out of the socket, suddenly it's loose, and the edge/corner you were prying on lifts up into the air, leaving the other end in the socket. Voila, bent pins. A special tool that lifts all edges straight up, simultaneously would be ideal. Lacking that, use something that is not a long lever (like the PCI slot cover's long edge). That way, even if the chip does suddenly come loose, you can't lift the edge any higher than the length of your lever. Note: If you're using the long edge of a PCI slot cover, then the length of your "lever" is the narrow width of the slot cover. Another option is to pry by gently inserting a flat head screwdriver and then gently twisting the screwdriver. There, the length of your lever is only the width of the screwdriver.
  19. On a related note, what did adding a PAS16 card to the Macintosh really get you compared to the built-in sound capabilities? The four-input mixer? Anything else?
  20. Some leakages, such as from an alkaline battery will be basic instead of acidic and so vinegar is an appropriate neutralizing agent. I'm not sure where the pH of capacitor goo falls, or Lithium batteries for that matter. I think the 1/2AA is some kind of lithium chemistry, or am I misremembering?
  21. trag

    Solid State Drive for G3?

    The thing to know about most (all?) power supply connectors is that they are a plastic housing filled with pins. The pins and the housing are sold separately. The pins crimp onto the ends of wires. Then the pins snap into the housing. There's usually a little "latch" or prong (or two) that hold the pin in the housing after it has been inserted. So, if you want to rearrange the wires on a connector, you can carefully remove the relevant pins from the housing (depending on the brand/model of housing there are often dedicated tools available, though improvising works too) and insert them in the hole to which you wish to move them. Of course, new pins can be bought and crimped onto the ends of cut wires and new housings purchased. The trick in the latter case is knowing which housing/pins you need.
  22. trag

    PRAM won't zap?

    That's what I remember. You should double check though, because my memory is hazy.
  23. Thank you for the links. You are indeed correct. The Hardware Developer Note says that Heathrow contains a MESH controller. Color me surprised. I thought/expected it was basically CURIO with extra stuff brought inside. Although, CURIO was an AMD chip, so maybe Apple didn't have access to all the rights/designs, or something and had to make Heathrow from scratch. On the other hand.... Wandering into speculation country.... The separate Fast SCSI bus first showed up on the NuBus PowerMac 8100 and 9150. It was based on the 53CF96 which was made by a number of folks. I'm not sure where the design originated, maybe NCR. But AMD also sold one and I think Zilog might have as well. NCR mutated into Symbios (?) and later LSI Logic. The separate Fast SCSI bus on the next generation, the PCI PowerMacs, used the MESH controller, in exactly the same package as the 53CF96. I strongly suspect that the MESH is just a licensed version of the 53CF96. Or, perhaps, Apple's home rolled version to avoid licensing fees? In the volumes they were using, it may have paid to roll their own. One of these days, I'm going to replace a MESH with a 53CF96 or vice versa and see what happens. Meanwhile, the CURIO chip which first appeared in AV Quadras and was used in both the NuBus and the PCI PowerMacs, contained a 53C94 or 53C96 cell. In all those machines the CURIO chip provided the slower internal/external SCSI bus, as well as serial ports and ethernet. The 53C94/96 is closely related to the 53CF96. So, I wonder, if Heathrow was an Apple design, and they put a 53C94/96 in Heathrow, would it be inaccurate for them to claim that Heathrow contains a "MESH-based SCSI controller". I am also now curious to see what SCSI Probe says about the Beige's built in SCSI bus...
  24. trag

    PRAM won't zap?

    The Beige G3 can run off of a standard ATX power supply. There's a jumper on the motherboard to switch it between expecting the Apple PS in the desktop case, or an ATX style supply, which, IIRC, is in the tower case. Look up the detials somewhere reliable before trying it. My memory is vague except that the jumper exists.
  25. trag

    Fast 601: PowerComputing Power120

    It's really a pity that Powerwatch.com went away. There was so much collected wisdom on the Power120 on that forum. It might be worth contacting Jeff Keller (of Digital Camera Resource Page fame) to see if he still has an archive of PowerWatch. It would make a nice addition to the materials here. Pretty much every nuance of Power Computing machines was poured over in those forums. Jeff Keller ran PowerWatch before his Digital Camera page. https://www.dpreview.com/about/staff/jeff.keller I would recommend replacing the heat sink grease as well. Carefully, don't want to shatter the CPU. Also, I have this really faint (unreliable) memory of reading reports from folks who found a coin cell in the power supply that needed replacing eventually. Might make sense as the power supply is a weird hybrid between AT and ATX. Even when new, the Power 120s ran hot. Do you have the flat griddle heat sink or the raised cage heat sink? The former allows you to put longer NuBus cards in the lower slots, but the latter provides better cooling, according to PCC back in the day. I ran one as my main machine for several years back when they were almost current. They got cleared out at the beginning of the PCI era for, IIRC, $600 (or was it $1200, might be confusing the S900 price with the Power 120). Anyway, I had a JackHammer in there with two ST32550W drives, an ST32550N on built-in internal Fast SCSI and another ST32550N on the internal/external slow SCSI bus, with FWB's RAID ToolKit tieing them altogehter into a four drive striped array. The weird thing was, I had tried four ST32550W drives on the JackHammer, but after two drives, I didn't get any improvement in performance. Adding each of the narrow drives to the other SCSI busses bumped it up another 2 or 3 MB/s. As it turns out, even though the ST32550W/N was a "Barracuda" drive and spun at 7200 RPM, it was one of the very first in that line. It only delivered about 6 MB/s regardless of what kind of interface one connected it to. In a RAID there were diminishing returns, such that all four drives together only delivered about 14 MB/s. Boy, those early 7200RPM drives were noisy too. I ended up buying some speaker sound batting and installed a layer on the side covers of the Power 120 case to absorb the noise from the Barracuda drives. I had two 20" Radius Intellicolor monitors, IIRC. One on the HPV card and the other on a Radius IV GX 1360. Those monitors were huge and needed about 1' to 18" between them to avoid interfering with each other. Good times.
×