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Patater

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Everything posted by Patater

  1. Howdy comrades, I was asked to build Dhrystone for 68k Macintosh, just for fun. I felt I should share it with you all. This ancient benchmark will measure the integer performance of your Macintosh. Let us compare results, if feel so moved. Dhrystone for 68k Macintosh Results: Macintosh SE/30 40000 Runs Dhrystones per Second: 2666.7
  2. Patater

    Dhrystone for 68k Macintosh

    If you are interested in benchmarking with your cache disabled, I wrote a tool to help you disable the cache. Disabling the cache should make a big difference on Dhrystone results.
  3. Patater

    Dhrystone for 68k Macintosh

    I sold my Macintosh IIfx to a cool dude about two years back. It was missing a rubber foot or two. I told him that I thought I had seen one around and that I would send it to him, but I didn't find that foot until last month. He was happy to finally receive it. I also asked him to run Dhrystone for me. Here are the results from his wicked fast Macintosh IIfx, with 32 MiB memory, running System 7.5.5. 100000 runs: Microseconds for one run through Dhrystone: 130.0 Dhrystones per Second: 7692.3 200000 runs: Microseconds for one run through Dhrystone: 125.0 Dhrystones per Second: 8000.0 500000 runs: Microseconds for one run through Dhrystone: 128.0 Dhrystones per Second: 7812.5 Unfortunately, it isn't over 9000.
  4. Patater

    MacTCP Documentation

    I'm looking to make some Internet applications for System 6. I'm having trouble figuring out where the MacTCP API is documented. I'd like to use MacTCP because it should allow my application to work with System 6 through 9 (with Open Transport being backwards compatible with the MacTCP API). I know of one fellow who has done MacTCP development recently. Unfortunately, on his web pages, there doesn't seem to be any mention of MacTCP books, manuals, online reference materials, or web pages. I can see that he is using MPW. I'd like to use Think C 5, but I can use MPW if I have to. This probably means making custom header files or modifying the MPW ones. Fellow comrades, do you know of any books, manuals, online references, or web pages that document the MacTCP API? Your assistance is much appreciated.
  5. Patater

    MacTCP Documentation

    Thank you very much. The MacTCP Developer Kit is exactly what I needed. It even contained the document entitled "MacTCP Programmer's Guide", referred to by Falkenburg, which I couldn't find on the Internet. Thank you comrade!
  6. Patater

    Stellar specimen of a TiBook! [PICS]

    That's a very pretty machine you have there. It's rare to find one in such nice condition. I picked one up new back in 2003, but it broke. It came with annoying stuck pixels. I've had to send it into Apple for various reasons. About a year ago, the hinges made a funny noise when exercised and the bottom half of the display was stuck displaying white. I got about 6 years of use out of the bugger. It was the most fragile, prone to failure Mac I've owned. I hope yours is longer lived.
  7. Patater

    My Latest Restoration

    Hello, I am new here. I am happy to join up with my many like-minded comrades. I wish I would have discovered this place earlier. Here is my latest restoration, my first one in a while. It turned out to be a pretty easy one. The computer was missing a hard drive and only had on-board memory. I couldn't find my floppy disk stash, so I recovered the computer without any floppy disks; I was very happy to have an AppleCD 600e drive to help out. The LC III now has 36 MB RAM and a 40MB SCSI HD with System 7.5.3. Don't you wish modern computers had as much RAM as hard disk space? Well, maybe you don't care about modern computers at all. http://patater.com/files/pictures/lciii.jpg I'd like to put a IIe card into the LC III, but I haven't found any for sale that come with the cable. My next project is restoring a SimasiMac SE/30. I haven't opened the case yet, but the machine looks to be in pretty bad shape. It will be quite an adventure. http://patater.com/files/pictures/simasimacse30.jpg Nice to meet you all.
  8. Patater

    My Latest Restoration

    Be sure to replace those old and prone to leaking caps. Max out the RAM, too. She's a beautiful machine.
  9. As this Conner hard drive I have seems very noisy and about to die, I'd like to try building a dual floppy Macintosh Portable. I have never owned a dual floppy Macintosh, but I think it would be very nice. I love the sounds that the Sony floppy drives make. To have two of them going at the same time would be aurally delicious, aside from being useful. I have two Macintosh Portable floppy drives with lower deck brackets. I don't know what the upper deck floppy bracket looks like. I can mount the floppy drive I have into the upper deck hard drive bracket, but it leaves the top of the floppy drive unshielded and exposed. I also need very long floppy drive mounting screws, as the floppy drive is a little less wide than the hard drive. Even after I do get the mounting issues solved, there will be the problem of being able to insert floppy disks into the drive. The removable plastic face plates I have are from hard drive Macintosh Portables, so they don't have a slot for floppy disk insertion. It has been recommended that I use a steel template and a rotary Dremel in order to add a slot to one of my face plates, but I don't have a model to base my cut on. Where I do the cut might stray from the model, depending on where the floppy drive ends up after my upper deck mounting job. So, in summary, I humbly request assistance from the army in procuring pictures of the original dual floppy Macintosh Portable face plate and the upper deck floppy drive bracket. Any help or advice is much appreciated.
  10. I took apart my Macintosh Portable this evening to make a count of the different capacitors I'll be needing to replace as part of the standard "holy crap this is old I need to replace the caps" operation. I updated the capacitor replacement wiki page with my findings. To my surprise, I discovered that this Macintosh Portable has the nastiest case of electrolytic corrosion I've ever seen on a logic board. I know some people on this forum want to know what leaking electrolyte's effects look like; and boy do I have a treat for them. Naked Pics Nasty Pics
  11. Patater

    Building a Dual Floppy Macintosh Portable

    I replaced all capacitors on the Portable, including the through-hole ones. The Macintosh Portable through-holes are plated through-holes. This means that solder is supposed to go down through the hole along the sides of the lead. It is easy for me to see that I had proper fill (at least 75%) when working on the axial capacitors, but it is harder for me to verify this with the radial capacitors.
  12. Patater

    A Naked and Nasty Macintosh Portable

    I had two dead Portable batteries. I wanted to re-cell them, so I attempted opening one with a screwdriver, but that totally messed up and and bent the plastic. I have one remaining, but I don't know how to open it cleanly in order to install new cells. I'd appreciate any advice you could give on rebuilding the Portable's battery. I acquired a flaky Portable in 2003. It would often crash or sad mac, but it could boot and do stuff more often than not. When I tried to play with it again around February of 2010, I found that my PowerBook 100 adapter had failed (by no longer outputting any current; i.e. as soon as a load is present, the voltage goes to zero). I replaced all the capacitors and hooked up an alternate battery, but currently all I can get out of it is a sad mac. Your battery opening advice might also help me to open and fix my power adapter. My goal for this Portable is to get it running solid with a good battery and a good power adapter so that I can do software development on it. I am reading Inside Macintosh now to prepare for this. Eventually, I'd like to boost its RAM to the max, and that will probably involve creating new hardware.
  13. Patater

    A Naked and Nasty Macintosh Portable

    If you installed any backwards, that is exactly the problem. You have a lot of Portables. What do you do with them all? Do they all have batteries that work?
  14. Patater

    Building a Dual Floppy Macintosh Portable

    It is great to know that the PowerBook 100 adapter is good for charging as well as running without the battery. It is also good to verify that it is a switching type. There doesn't seem to be any special rigging required in order to run off of a 9V supply. I was able to boot into a sad mac with just the 9V battery. A lot of 9V supplies are meant to replace 9V batteries and so come with a 9V battery connector on them. The only 9V power supply I have is a 300mA type, so that won't do me any good on this. With my PowerBook 100 adapter dead, I'm now on the market for a compatible power adapter. I had this 6V battery laying around, so I decided to hook it up. The cables for the Macintosh Portable battery didn't give me much slack, but I was able to hook it up and run the machine without the case on. This experiment should validate whether or not the sad mac is due to flaky power. Unfortunately, I still get the sad mac. However, the code is pretty consistently 03001300:00001FFA. This $1300 code might be a CPU exception code, indicating that I'm receiving an interrupt too early in the boot process (as per myoldmac). That in turn might mean that an interrupt line is being permanently asserted. As I'm not sure which caps are in the interrupt path (if any) I'll just look over all my work again carefully and hopefully I'll find something.
  15. Patater

    A Naked and Nasty Macintosh Portable

    Yes, trag's caps are great. I need to get some more from him. I am missing one capacitor in order to complete the replacement on my SE/30. I am also missing one capacitor in order to complete the replacement on my LC III. I was hoping to finish the SE/30 this weekend, but it looks like I'll have to wait until I can get my capacitor fix from trag again.
  16. Patater

    Building a Dual Floppy Macintosh Portable

    When the computer first boots up, it displays a funky pattern on the screen. This pattern goes away in less than a second. This is probably a typical memory check or something. In attempting to photograph that, I discovered that some other sad mac codes are displayed before the final code is reached. These transient codes do seem to have a meaning, but maybe not one that makes sense; do they really matter or are they just noise before the correct code is shown? I've found that a few different codes are displayed over my few attempts to start up the machine. The code is of the form "0030017xx:00001FFA", where xx can be one of 01, 38, 39, 3E. This major code 17 doesn't seem to be documented anyplace, but perhaps I just don't know how to read these errors. This is one of a few possible final sad mac codes. Here is my best guess. One of the sad mac major codes shown is 14. I suspect that because I'm attempting to boot from the 9V battery, the power manager is complaining. Because there isn't much power available, the sad mac changes around until it reaches some equilibrium on some invalid code. I'll have to try with a new battery and power adapter to see if this not enough power guess is on the right path. I'll be thankful for any guesses you have or recommendations for tests I should run.
  17. Patater

    A Naked and Nasty Macintosh Portable

    I finished capacitor replacement a few nights ago. Here are some pictures.
  18. Patater

    Building a Dual Floppy Macintosh Portable

    After I finished replacing the capacitors in this guy, I assembled it with the second floppy drive in place, connected with a self-made ribbon cable. The drives stack very well and are firmly in place. The upper drive could slide around if I forced it hard enough, but it is held in place with significant amount of metal squeezing metal friction. Unfortunately, I am currently experiencing some undocumented sad mac action; this may be due to attempting to boot from a 9V battery by not having the battery cover on. My PowerBook 100 power adapter is dead, so I'll need to explore alternate powering methods. I have a replacement battery I'll be wiring up to try out tomorrow, but I don't have a charger for it yet. By the way, if a PowerBook 100 adapter were available to me, could it be used to charge the Macintosh Portable without causing damage? I'm not familiar enough with the charging circuitry on the logic board (or possibly in the adapter) to say. It would also be nice to verify that the power adapter is a switching supply (as it feels pretty lightweight to me) or something else. Thanks for the information, comrades. I enjoy learning about these wonderful marvels of engineering. Your help is much appreciated.
  19. Patater

    A Naked and Nasty Macintosh Portable

    I finally got my tools in order and took the time to do some work on this smoking hot babe today. First off, I removed all the nasty caps with my new diagonal cutters. Some of them very easily came off from the PCB all on their own. Others I tugged at a little bit. Some left leads behind that I later had to desolder; the best way to desolder these seems to be to clean them, flux them, head up the lead only (not the corroded solder), and push on it a bit. Sometimes, you can find a bit of shiny late 1980s solder under these leads. The leads that came out with no problem had corrosion even within the footprint of the removed lead. To clean the board after removing the capacitors, I used 91% isopropyl alcohol (although I'd prefer 99%), a non-abrasive lint-free wipe, and a small brush. I'm still waiting for a horsehair brush, so I used one of those disposable (pre-pasted) toothbrushes instead of what I'd have preferred to use. I splashed a bit of alcohol onto my wipe and proceeded to rub the PCB through the wipe. Most of the crumbly brown and white stuff came off the board with the alcohol and brushing. Even after the alcohol, she wasn't looking so good yet. It was time for the flux. I applied flux with a Kester #951 ("no clean", but I clean it anyway) flux pen. Then I heated up the pad with a 750 degrees Fahrenheit iron tip, to try and melt what solder was there. I could often push the surface corrosion away from the solder after I got into it. While the pad was hot, I applied fresh new solder and left a nice wet hump of solder on the pad. I got out my solder wick and wicked the hump away, while at the same time taking advantage of the oft maligned property of solder wick: that it is abrasive. With a few (2 or 3) swipes of the solder wick, the pad became much cleaner. To get things really pretty, I applied flux again, put down more solder, wicked it away, and then cleaned with alcohol (in the same manner as before). With the exception of a few light scratches, the pads looked pretty much new. They'll be much easier to work with and much more receptive of new parts now. She is looking quite a bit better after this work, as you have seen. Her pads are shiny and fresh. The next step is putting on some nice new orange tantalum capacitors.
  20. Patater

    Building a Dual Floppy Macintosh Portable

    I suspect that most of the solder is directly under the capacitor: the rest has been mostly corroded away. I do see some solder on the outside, but I can't tell if it liquefies when I apply the iron. I don't think it is liquefying when I do apply the iron. This is less a problem with HighK solder (which I don't believe it is) and more a problem with an old corroded away solder joint, which I don't have experience reworking, yet. This is the oldest and most corroded circuit board I've attempted rework on.
  21. Patater

    Building a Dual Floppy Macintosh Portable

    The Macintosh Portable web server is interesting. I won't be doing that, though. I am currently attempting to remove capacitors from my Portable's logic board. I used some flux to clear away most of the corrosion on the capacitor leads. There isn't much solder left. I took my soldering iron to the solder. But the solder won't melt! After I pick up some wire snips, I will try out the method documented here: http://450.servehttp.com/reference/caps/.
  22. Howdy all, I bought a 14" 233MHz Wallstreet (or maybe PDQ, can't tell yet) a few days ago. The machine smells of smoke and most likely belonged to a smoker at one point in its life. Before I opened the case, I could hear some rattling going on inside whenever I moved the machine. It also had a loose power connector, which preventing it from working. I bought the machine to act as a bridge between older peripherals and data and the modern world of peripherals and data. In order for it to serve this purpose, I had to do some work on it. I replaced the sound/AC board and gave it a bit of a cleaning this morning. During the replacement, I found what was rattling around in the computer: a ball of tar. Unfortunately, the display still rattles so I may need to open it and clean it, too. I share with you pictures of my adventure into the heart of the smokerstreet. The keyboard and heatsink and modem have been removed. There are many air holes plugged with gunk. Even the hard drive got gunked with tar. I used a toothpick to scrape away the tar. This is what the power connector's solder joints can look like when the power connector is loose. These are close ups of the bad solder joints on the sound/AC board. Perhaps years of smoke dissolved the solder. I replaced the sound/AC board with a different board. You can see that these joints have a healthy amount of solder on them and look smooth, without cracks. Here are some of the treasures I removed from the smokerstreet along with the toothpicks I used during the light cleaning (i.e. scraping away at crap). The machine now runs happily. However, it is running OS 9 and has a password protected login screen. I can only log in as a child user (Eva or Tabby), as the Mom account is password protected. The child accounts log into "Panels" instead of Finder. I can see in the Apple menu that the name of the computer is "Steve Landon's Computer", but I can't do too much else with the thing, I think. I want to look in Apple System Profiler to find out what this machine is (PDQ or not). I'd like to backup all this nice software and start fresh, so my plan is to use dd to image the hard drive after I hook it up to a modern computer (with a mini IDE to USB 2.0 adapter). I'll probably run Mac OS 8.6 on the guy, as I have a disc for Mac OS 8.5. I wonder if there is a Reader Rabbit wad for Doom...
  23. Patater

    Building a Dual Floppy Macintosh Portable

    For those who don't read Japanese, the procedure is pretty simple. I had taken off the floppy drive cover, but I didn't need to. I just needed to unscrew it so that I could fit it into the hard drive bracket with the floppy drive cover on (without the screw heads getting in the way). You just place the floppy drive with cover (but without the screws) into the hard drive bracket. The floppy drive cover has some bent metal on the side, so it keeps things snug. There are no places to put screws to secure the floppy drive into the bracket, but it seems to be enough snug as is. So most of my problems were solved by this guy. There are some amazing people out there that the English speaking world just doesn't know about due to all of our search queries being in English. All we ever see of the Internet is the English stuff, but the Internet is truly global. I need to send this guy a big thank you after the project is done (so that I can send him pictures of it completed). Now my only remaining issues are that I don't have another floppy drive cable and I have no experience putting holes in plastic in a professional way. I've only hot-knifed things, and they didn't look pretty afterwards. It'd also be nice to see how the original dual floppy Macintosh Portable did the upper floppy disk mount. Thanks all for your help.
  24. Patater

    Building a Dual Floppy Macintosh Portable

    Holy crap I found some more pictures. http://square.umin.ac.jp/~itoh/dual_fdd_2.html This guy is seriously awesome.
  25. Patater

    Building a Dual Floppy Macintosh Portable

    Holy crap I finally found some pictures. http://square.umin.ac.jp/~itoh/dual_fdd_1.html That guy seems to be a serious Macintosh Portable nut. I wish I had found his page sooner. This covers it for the removable faceplate stuff. I'm still looking around for information on the brackets and the best ways to rework this plastic.
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