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mdeverhart

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  1. It’s hard to say for sure, but if the battery in the 165 is leaking, yes, I’d be a concerned about potential logic board damage. It looks like you’ll need a T8 and a T10 to get the bottom case off. I know the Duos need a T8 and a T6. You’ll probably want to get a set of small “precision” screwdrivers for PowerBook repairs - I’d guess T6 to T10, #000 to #0 Phillips, and a few small flat blades. Here’s the service source document for the 165, which has instructions on disassembly: https://tim.id.au/laptops/apple/powerbook/powerbook_160.165.180.pdf And he
  2. For the 165, it’s possible that the battery has leaked and is stuck to the contacts and frame. This post has some instructions on removing the bottom from the machine so that you can extract the battery: For the Duo, I’d try pushing on the left side of the battery cover while pushing the battery button in - that may relieve enough pressure so that you can push the release button in and get it to unlock.
  3. I’d originally posted this on another duo thread, but figured it would be better off here — Duo PRAM battery fabrication: I ordered 2x of these from Amazon. They’re 3V lithium rechargeables, with solder tabs to make the job a little easier, and hopefully keep too much heat from the soldering iron from reaching the cells. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07W4NWHJ8/ The first image shows the battery I took out of the machine. The red wire is connected to the positive (+) terminal of the top battery, the white wire is connected to the negative (-) terminal of
  4. @sutekh Unfortunately, the partial pin out on pgs. 58-59 of the DN is the only one I’ve found. I’ve been following your WiFi modem project with interest, and one of these days I want to spend some time with a multimeter to see if I can uncover some of the missing pins. I’ll definitely let you know if I come up with anything.
  5. Based on the service guide and the design note, I’m pretty sure it’s a PCB with the two power buttons on it (rear and keyboard), and a few traces. According to the design note, the pin out of the connector includes GND, unswitched 5V, a couple of keyscan lines to the power manager for the power buttons, and a CPU on/off signal to the power manager. I’ve not seen one, but a crummy picture is here: https://www.macrepaircentral.us/powerbook-200-series-duo-210-duo-230-250-270c/series-upgrade.html
  6. Hopefully it’s not fried. My recollection is that the power button above the keyboard may not work if the PRAM battery is flat dead. At least on mine, the power manager wasn’t in a good state with a dead PRAM battery, and the power button above the keyboard just signals the power manager to turn on the system, rather than actually turning on the power supplies. The power button on the back will actually turn on the supplies, allowing the entire system (including the power manager) to boot even if the PRAM battery is dead. That could be what’s happening if the seller is pushing the power button
  7. @Challenger 1983 Thanks! I was happy with how it turned out. I don’t have a lot of mileage on my Duo yet, but I’m pleased so far. Disassembly sure is easy, especially compared to the horror stories about the 500 series PBs. There’s a post in the Trading Post for a couple of Minidocks for sale, asking $100 each:
  8. PRAM battery fabrication: I ordered 2x of these from Amazon. They’re 3V lithium rechargeables, with solder tabs to make the job a little easier, and hopefully keep too much heat from the soldering iron from reaching the cells. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07W4NWHJ8/ The first image shows the battery I took out of the machine. The red wire is connected to the positive (+) terminal of the top battery, the white wire is connected to the negative (-) terminal of the top battery and the (+) terminal of the bottom battery, and the black wire is connected to the (-)
  9. Here’s a link to the Duo Service Source guide: http://tim.id.au/laptops/apple/powerbook/powerbook_200_series.pdf (Not my website, but I think that’s where I originally found it).
  10. Getting the logic board out to do the caps isn’t bad at all. The most important thing is to get the latch inside the battery compartment (on the front left inside of the battery compartment) unhooked, and you can see that one and use your fingers to get pressure in the right place. Fortunately you don’t need to take the center clutch cover off in order to get the logic board out - that one is a pain. For the logic board you can remove the CPU stiffener and display assembly as one piece. You only need to remove the center clutch cover if you need to disassemble the display or take the display o
  11. I’d second that. I have a 230 I’ve been restoring, and I’m really enjoying it. That said, like all vintage Macs, there are things to be aware of: 1. Capacitors are absolutely necessary. There are two main groups of leaking caps: (1) In the power supply section of the main logic board, and (2) in the display assemblies (varies depending on the model - my 230 has some on the display board around the LCD but none on the inverter board for the backlight, but my understanding is that some models do have them there). The main logic board ones are the biggest concern. Due to the battery c
  12. Saw this blog post earlier this week - author built a SW controlled, super capacitor based UPS for his RaSCSI to protect the Pi from unexpected power-down when the host computer shuts down: https://www.smbaker.com/supercapacitor-uninterruptable-power-supply-ups-for-raspberry-pi
  13. I'd try a power manager reset if you haven't already: http://www.jacsoft.co.nz/Tech_Notes/PP_Manage.shtml#faq7
  14. Here's a good thread on the 2400c and maintenance it might need, PRAM battery being the main one: Look out for leaking capacitors on the 2300c - the Duos have some electrolytic capacitors in the on-board power supply and battery charging circuit that have either leaked already or will soon. The conductive goo that leaks out can cause shorts, which on the Duo is particularly bad news - it can short the high voltage charging circuit (12V+) to the low voltage logic devices (5V), causing fatal damage. There are several threads around here on recapping Duos. There's also a good
  15. Glad it’s working! Looks like you’ve got quite the set up there!
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