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Garrett's Finds


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19 hours ago, olePigeon said:

Micro Center, on the other hand, is an absolutely fantastic store to build custom PCs.  I dearly miss them.  They have the absolute best deals around, especially their CPU + motherboard combo deals.   Usually got either a heavily discounted or sometimes even free motherboard with the purchase of a bundled CPU.  They were all in-store only, of course, to drive traffic there, but I didn't mind.  Beat the pants off anything you could buy online.

Amen to all of that.  I've got two that are "reasonably" close to me but when I lived within 3 miles of one of them that was seriously dangerous.  Every TV in my house ended up with an HTPC attached to it because of how close I lived to that Micro Center.  Even back in my CC days we'd always (quietly) recommend going there for accessories and whatnot since they didn't charge an arm and a leg for cables, adapters, etc.

 

On 1/24/2021 at 8:19 AM, Garrett said:

I may go back, hopefully on a less busy day.

I wish you the best of luck on that endeavor.  If yours is anything like either of mine it's rare when they're not busy.

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I went with a friend (I loathe driving in big cities) so I didn't want to stay too long to avoid boring her. Interestingly, she told me she is good at soldering and has done some light programming work with Arduinos. I was shocked to see how busy it was, and to see the diversity in people there. I was thinking the only people there would be "geeks" like myself, but that wasn't the case.

 

If I went by myself, I probably would've got lost in there for hours. The prices on everything was pretty reasonable. Online I took a look at their processor/motherboard combos and they are super cheap. I definitely know where to go if I ever want to build my own computer and have one nearby. Unfortunately, the one in OPKS is the closest one (~60+ mile drive) and the only other one in MO is in St. Louis.

 

Returning to my Macs, I'm now trying to find a way to make a backup of the SuperSE files. Since the SE has the 030 accelerator installed, I can't use the FloppyEmu in HD20 emulation mode. I tried using AppleTalk file sharing with my Classic as the "host" (System 7.1) but the SuperSE (System 6.0.5) doesn't "see" it, even with AppleTalk active. Will I need to buy a SCSI-2-SD to transfer files with the SuperSE?

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6 hours ago, Garrett said:

Returning to my Macs, I'm now trying to find a way to make a backup of the SuperSE files. Since the SE has the 030 accelerator installed, I can't use the FloppyEmu in HD20 emulation mode. I tried using AppleTalk file sharing with my Classic as the "host" (System 7.1) but the SuperSE (System 6.0.5) doesn't "see" it, even with AppleTalk active. Will I need to buy a SCSI-2-SD to transfer files with the SuperSE?

 

Any kind of external SCSI HD or Zip drive?

 

If it's too big to fit on one floppy, there's one of the file compression utilities that can break archives up into floppy sized chunks, and then re-assembles them when you extract. I just can't remember the name right now! :-(

 

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Interesting that the SE doesn't see the classic server. I networked my SE back when I had it on 6.0.8 with a 7.1 and 7.5.3 mac without issues. I presume you managed to network your other macs before without issue, right? In order to rule out that as a problem.

 

What port did you use? Modem or Printer port, to connect them?

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6 hours ago, BacioiuC said:

Interesting that the SE doesn't see the classic server. I networked my SE back when I had it on 6.0.8 with a 7.1 and 7.5.3 mac without issues. I presume you managed to network your other macs before without issue, right? In order to rule out that as a problem.

 

What port did you use? Modem or Printer port, to connect them?

On both, I believe I used the printer port on both machines. The Classic was the machine being used as the host, so that I could transfer files from the SE to the Classic and onto a folder in the FloppyEmu. (The Classic booted into System 7.1 from the FloppyEmu.)

 

6 hours ago, LaPorta said:

What sort of cabling are you using between the two?

Just a standard Apple serial cable. Even has the little Apple logo on the ends.

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I visited the Micro Center when I was in SoCal a few years ago (2017), and it was FUN!

 

I got some parts for the file server I was building at the time (cables, drives, etc), and I picked up a souvenir Micro Center-branded flash drive which I still use (since it's 64 GB at USB 3.0 speeds, it's one of the fastest ones I have).  Also picked up a nice little keyboard (sorta like the numpad-less Apple Keyboard, but not).

 

I'm going to have to go back to SoCal at some point once the pandemic's over for some important business, so maybe while I'm there I can go back and have another look around!

 

c

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7 hours ago, CC_333 said:

I got some parts for the file server I was building at the time (cables, drives, etc), and I picked up a souvenir Micro Center-branded flash drive which I still use (since it's 64 GB at USB 3.0 speeds, it's one of the fastest ones I have).  Also picked up a nice little keyboard (sorta like the numpad-less Apple Keyboard, but not).

My "file server" back at home currently only has 290 GB of storage - a 250 GB hard drive for storage, and 40 GB drive for Linux Mint. When I get my own place, I plan on either upgrading that server or building a completely new one from the ground up. The hard drives I saw at Micro Center were really decently priced, and I was contemplating buying a drive right there. But I currently don't have a use for that server because its at home and I can't (easily) connect it to our WiFi and use it as a network server of sorts.

 

250 GB is nothing.

 

7 hours ago, CC_333 said:

Regarding serial cables, doesn't one need a special crossover cable for direct machine-to-machine LocalTalk?

AppleTalk, LocalTalk, etc. is still slightly confusing to me, even after reading about it. I thought you could directly connect two machines together and have them talk to each other, but I guess not? I knew you needed a special dongle to be able to use AppleTalk/LocalTalk for larger networks, modems, etc.

 

I might buy a SCSI-2-SD at some point for the SuperSE... not sure if I should go for an internal one and replace the old, loud Maxtor hard drive (which seems to work fine, and I like because of the noise) or an external one that simply plugs into the back of the machine. 

 

I'm about to post a "WTB" for a power supply for the PowerBook 165. I'm not sure if the PB 165 will even power on... the original owner who gave the machines to me said they hadn't been powered on in over a decade. With that said, is there an easy way to extract the battery from the PB 165? The door on the front left side of the machine slides forward a little bit, but doesn't want to slide all the way off or come off. Is that normal? I don't want to break anything so I stopped while I was ahead.

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Today I popped the bucket off the SuperSE again in another attempt to remove the logic board and get a look at the Mobius accelerator card. As per LaPorta's recommendation, I discharged the CRT and removed the neck board. While this didn't make accessing the power connector as easy as on my other (dual-floppy) SE or my Classic, it made it much easier and less stressful than before.

 

Removing the logic board is easy, as always. I got to get a look at the Mobius accelerator card and the Motorola 68030 that makes this thing a powerhouse. I looked at the battery while inside. Unlike the Varta battery in my other 1988 SE, this one is stone dead and has a concerning white spot near one of the legs. (On the back of the board, there's some white stuff surrounding the hole for one of the battery legs.) I have a friend who says they're good at soldering (the one who went to Micro Center with me) so I may have them assist me in pulling these PRAM batteries out of my SEs so I can sleep sound knowing they're gone. (Are there any other ways to remove the battery if you don't have a soldering iron?)

 

Unfortunately, getting the logic board reinstalled in the machine was hell. While the logic board on my other SE slides right back in both rails, for some reason (perhaps the accelerator card?) this logic board doesn't want to. It only wants to slide back into one of the side rails, but won't easily go into the other - as if the space between the two rails is too narrow. I actually had to (as carefully as possible) force the board back into the slotted rails and shove it down.

 

Got the machine almost entirely buttoned up and forgot to reconnect the external monitor port connector to the accelerator card. DOH! Instead of tearing the machine back apart, I just put it back in there but didn't reconnect it for now. I'll likely have the logic board out sometime in the near future to remove that battery and perhaps send the boards off for recapping. Plugged the machine back in and it works fine without it plugged in, though.

 

My next goal is to get the PowerBooks working.

 

lb.thumb.jpg.7a1b4eb67d8c297f4bfccb1a18a3b5cc.jpg68030.thumb.jpg.8e9f9f31b01b763f84083b56d5cf8189.jpglb_battery.thumb.jpg.1045425721cbccd70a097c187ca2e4d8.jpg

 

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That looks really nice!

 

I think that smaller socket just above the '030 is for an FPU.  Most software doesn't use it (I think some spreadsheet software and scientific/mathematical programs use the FPU extensively if one is available), but if you come across one (for the '030, I think either a 68881 or 68882 would work if you can find one in the proper form factor), it might be a neat thing to install "because you can" :)

 

c

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6 hours ago, CC_333 said:

That looks really nice!

 

I think that smaller socket just above the '030 is for an FPU.  Most software doesn't use it (I think some spreadsheet software and scientific/mathematical programs use the FPU extensively if one is available), but if you come across one (for the '030, I think either a 68881 or 68882 would work if you can find one in the proper form factor), it might be a neat thing to install "because you can" :)

 

c

I think you're right. I don't think I'll ever come across a 68881/68882 math coprocessor in the wild, and even if I do I'd have little use for it. Majority of the software I use probably wouldn't take advantage of it and run just fine on the 68030 itself.

 

Somewhat random question, but wasn't the 68030 and other Motorola processors fabbed at Motorola's facility in Austin, Texas? The original owner of this machine bought it (and the PowerBook 165) during their time at the University of Texas in Austin.

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On 1/26/2021 at 1:42 AM, CC_333 said:

Regarding serial cables, doesn't one need a special crossover cable for direct machine-to-machine LocalTalk?

 

On 1/26/2021 at 5:31 AM, Garrett said:

I thought you could directly connect two machines together and have them talk to each other, but I guess not?

 

If you use a standard Apple serial cable, the same as you'd use to attach a computer to a printer, it should work.  As far as I can tell, quite a bit of the confusion here is that there are cables out there that look like standard Apple serial cables, but aren't; they're either missing pins or are wired up differently.

 

On 1/26/2021 at 5:31 AM, Garrett said:

I knew you needed a special dongle to be able to use AppleTalk/LocalTalk for larger networks

 

Yup, the dongles just contain the necessary electrics to turn a point-to-point connection into a long bus with more than two computers on it.  There's nothing complicated in them, it's pretty much just to stop the computers from being able to knacker each other and to keep the signal nice and clean at the ends of the chain.

 

Your mention of modems here is a bit of a red herring; modems don't need anything special.  It's only if you're connecting more than two macs together that you need the dongles.  In all other cases, you can just use a standard serial lead.

 

9 hours ago, Garrett said:

(Are there any other ways to remove the battery if you don't have a soldering iron?)

 

If you just cut the leads with a pair of wire snippers, the battery ought to just come off.  It's not been glued down or anything in any of mine, anyway.

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Yes, as stated above, just cut the battery out if you don't want it. As an aside, in all the machines I have come across (I know, never say never), but I have NEVER seen one of those permanent, soldered-in VARTA batteries explode. Every last one I have seen was the removable type.

 

I think that is so neat that you found that accelerator. To date, with the exception of an external projector card in a Plus and an ethernet card in an SE/30, I have never come across a Mac with anything exciting. In fact, pretty much everyone that I find only has its base RAM. I am excited to see what you will do with this.

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13 hours ago, Garrett said:

Unfortunately, getting the logic board reinstalled in the machine was hell. While the logic board on my other SE slides right back in both rails, for some reason (perhaps the accelerator card?) this logic board doesn't want to. It only wants to slide back into one of the side rails, but won't easily go into the other - as if the space between the two rails is too narrow. I actually had to (as carefully as possible) force the board back into the slotted rails and shove it down.

When I had an accelerated SE I had to bend the frame and take the motherboard out essentially straight down.  The instructions specifically said to do so as there wasn't enough clearance to slide the motherboard back in with the accelerator attached.  If you got it in one of the frame rails and pulled the other out to pop the motherboard in everything would *just* fit.  It's very annoying to have to do so, but since Killy clips haven't been made in ages and whatever's left isn't going to be super strong (not that they ever were in the first place) it's the best option available.

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22 hours ago, LaPorta said:

I think that is so neat that you found that accelerator. To date, with the exception of an external projector card in a Plus and an ethernet card in an SE/30, I have never come across a Mac with anything exciting. In fact, pretty much everyone that I find only has its base RAM. I am excited to see what you will do with this.

The battery is still coming out, at least on this SE. I'm thinking about buying a new PRAM battery holder for the SuperSE so I can install a new PRAM battery that can be easily swapped out. While I don't really care about having to reset the time/date settings on my stock SE and Classic, there may be some settings on the SuperSE that may need to be retained for proper operation. (The 1988 Varta battery still holds time perfectly on my stock SE. So far it hasn't even drifted off by a minute. Regardless, I'd like to remove it. I may also install an aftermarket PRAM battery holder on that board when I get it recapped.)

 

This is the only Mac that I have that came upgraded. Both my stock SE and my Classic were stock. I have since upgraded the Classic from 2 MB to the full 4 MB of RAM.

19 hours ago, EvilCapitalist said:

When I had an accelerated SE I had to bend the frame and take the motherboard out essentially straight down.  The instructions specifically said to do so as there wasn't enough clearance to slide the motherboard back in with the accelerator attached.  If you got it in one of the frame rails and pulled the other out to pop the motherboard in everything would *just* fit.  It's very annoying to have to do so, but since Killy clips haven't been made in ages and whatever's left isn't going to be super strong (not that they ever were in the first place) it's the best option available.

It's a pain. I was worried about possibly damaging the logic board, but the only way I could get it to go in was by pulling the rail out and forcing the logic board in. It finally went in... and then I realized I forgot to reconnect the monitor port cable. Oh well, that port will likely never get used anyways.

 

Does anyone know if the Mobius 030 accelerator card should be recapped as well? I'm currently planning on having the logic/analog boards and the Sony power supply in the SuperSE recapped. With that, what size of anti-static ESD bag will I need for the logic board? Also, what size of anti-static ESD bags do people use to ship the analog board? With my Classic I had to jury-rig a "bag" by splicing two bags together.

 

I tried to find ESD bags at Micro Center (I'm running out) but everything they had was super small... about the size you'd use for an Arduino or Raspberry Pi.

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17 hours ago, Garrett said:

Does anyone know if the Mobius 030 accelerator card should be recapped as well?

It looks to me like all of the capacitors on your accelerator are tantalum capacitors. They are probably still fine, as there is no fluid inside them. From what I have heard though, when tantalum capacitors do fail, it is usually spectacularly (in a puff of smoke). Maybe replacing them preemptively is a good idea, but I don't think that this is something that people ordinarily ever do.

 

17 hours ago, Garrett said:

With that, what size of anti-static ESD bag will I need for the logic board?

I think you should just buy a multi-pack of various sizes of ESD bags online. That way, you'll have every kind of size possible, not to mention it isn't much cheaper to buy a single bag vs 40. I have fit Mac SE boards into the largest size included here: https://www.amazon.com/Resealable-Antistatic-Anti-Static-Motherboard-Electronic/dp/B07M95GLVR/ref=sr_1_9?dchild=1&keywords=esd+bags&qid=1611943213&sr=8-9

 

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Agree with David. I bought three different sizes, and they even came with static warning stickers (cool factor). Keep 'em in the drawer and you'll have a bunch for the future.

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7 hours ago, davidg5678 said:

It looks to me like all of the capacitors on your accelerator are tantalum capacitors. They are probably still fine, as there is no fluid inside them. From what I have heard though, when tantalum capacitors do fail, it is usually spectacularly (in a puff of smoke). Maybe replacing them preemptively is a good idea, but I don't think that this is something that people ordinarily ever do.

 

I think you should just buy a multi-pack of various sizes of ESD bags online. That way, you'll have every kind of size possible, not to mention it isn't much cheaper to buy a single bag vs 40. I have fit Mac SE boards into the largest size included here: https://www.amazon.com/Resealable-Antistatic-Anti-Static-Motherboard-Electronic/dp/B07M95GLVR/ref=sr_1_9?dchild=1&keywords=esd+bags&qid=1611943213&sr=8-9

 

I don't think I'll recap the accelerator card. I've heard of the RIFA caps blowing and putting out lots of putrid smoke, but I don't think I've heard of other tantalums going bad unless "provoked" (over-voltage, etc.)

 

I bought the largest size of ESD bags back in May. Will the large bags in the Amazon link hold the analog board for the compact Macs? I'll go ahead and purchase those, I like that they're resealable. (My current ones also came with ESD warning stickers.)

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16 hours ago, Garrett said:

RIFA caps ... other tantalums

 

That's partly because the RIFA capacitors aren't actually tantalums at all, they're based on paper covered with a metal foil.  Mains filtering capacitors are subject to a lot of abuse and have to fail safe under quite difficult conditions, which is why they're generally specialised parts made in different ways.

 

More information than you probably want is here: http://www.iequalscdvdt.com/Line-filter.html

 

(it is easy to lose oneself following links from that website, be warned.  A good rabbit hole.)

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On 1/22/2021 at 3:38 PM, LaPorta said:

As did the floppy drive, I’ve got a video guide you can use:

 

 

Sorry to bring this back up. I successfully cleaned and lubricated the 1.44MB SuperDrive in my 1991 Classic this past weekend using 70% alcohol (we didn't have any 90% available) and some liquid, spray-on lubricant. (I don't know what the name of it was... @Stillwell may know since we worked together on this project and he had the lubricants/tools/etc.)

 

I'm ordering lubricants and solutions for cleaning my own drives. I got the 91% isopropyl alcohol, and 3-in-1 oil. However, I can't find the lubricant in the white jar. Is there a suitable replacement for it, or where can I purchase it?

 

You also mention the process for rebuilding the gear assembly for the drive. Should I do that, or will I be fine?

 

Your guide helped us quite a bit on lubricating the drive. I was able to successfully clean and lubricate my drive, but unfortunately we couldn't get a external double-density drive going. Thanks for sharing it.

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I've been in Kansas City all day. Just got back - 1 a.m. here.

 

Here was today's (or yesterday's?) haul, courtesy of @Stillwell. He had some things that nobody else wanted, so I saved some of it from going to the electronics recycler.

 

First up, a Macintosh 512k-turned-Plus. This Plus has the official Apple upgrade kit. Unfortunately, he sold the keyboard and mice and I probably won't buy (at least not right now) a pair for this computer - essentially, it's a "display" computer (plus maybe future project?) However, it's EXTREMELY yellow - I haven't seen a Mac this yellow. It makes my stock SE (which I already called "CheddarMac" - though that is going to be this machine's new nickname) look mostly normal. This machine does work, but I'm not sure of the RIFA cap status. Therefore, I will avoid plugging it in until I get it recapped. (However, kinda pointless to plug it in without a keyboard or mouse.)

 

The computer came with a M a c B a g (by Linebacker) which is in nice condition. It doesn't have the lovely tobacco/cigarette smoke that permeates the bag that came with my stock SE. The bag provides a very tight fit around the computer and seems to have a decent amount of padding. There is a nice long keyboard compartment.

 

 

Second item was an Apple "High-Resolution" RGB monitor. He had two of these, and I brought one home. Both seemed to work (the high voltage sounds like it works) however we didn't have anything to test with. He doesn't have any non-compact Macs, and the "high resolution" monitor doesn't support the lowest resolution setting in Windows 10 so we couldn't test with his modern PC. I'm planning to order an adapter so I can use it with my PB 165, which I believe (according to the "monitors" control panel) can display up to 16 colors. I truly wish I could've brought two home, but I'm running out of space (more on that later.) These were previously owned by Sprint, so my main concern is they have received lots of hours of use. Hopefully that isn't the case, because I would really like a color vintage Mac at some point.

 

The monitors came with two IIcis he picked up - unfortunately, one was killed by the infamous Maxell bomb and the other was DOA. I believe the second IIci could've potentially been revived, but he had already parted it out. He still has the good logic board (which nobody wanted), which I may ask for him to keep. As cheesy as it sounds, I might frame it. :lol:8-)

Third item of note was a Color StyleWriter 2500. It seems to work, but the ink cartridge had long dried up and I couldn't install the driver software on my PB 165 because its hard drive is full. I'm hoping to possibly test this out when I get the SuperSE upgraded to 7.1 and get that up and going.

 

I picked up an Apple Extended keyboard, which I'm not sure if I'll use to replace my current Apple Standard keyboard. (I've grown fond on the Apple Standard keyboard that came with my stock SE, and it doesn't take up too much space.) Also two ADB mice and a bunch of cables.

 

 

This will likely be my last Mac conquest until I can get my own place with some more space. Currently I'm running out of room in my tiny dorm room-turned-apartment and will have even less space when I move back home this summer. (At home I will only have space for one Mac; the rest will have to go into storage in a family member's basement. Here, I've had to resort to using my living room coffee table for storing my Macs that are not in use.) I may look into shelving units for storing my collection back at home, but I'm not sure I could even fit a shelving unit in my bedroom and my dad would probably be less-than-pleased if my collection extended beyond my bedroom.

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Picked this up today:

I've always wanted a laser printer, but they have always been out of my price range so we've always had cheap(er) inkjet printers. Today I finally made my dream of owning a laser printer come true with this Apple LaserWriter IIsc from 1989. Found it on a Craigslist link posted here on the forums, but it was actually being sold by a guy who lives here in town and works at my university. Nice guy and had some great stories to tell.

 

The seller is the original owner of this printer. He purchased it new for over $3k in high school, and he used it with his Macintosh SE.

 

Much like the Apple High-Resolution RGB monitor I picked up last weekend, the LaserWriter Disc may stay in my car until next weekend, when I plan on taking all but one of my vintage Macs + peripherals home to "lighten the load" when I have to move completely out early next month. While I'm tempted to lug the LaserWriter in to test it out, it weighs ~50 pounds and it's pretty massive. It likely beats my modern printer (a Canon MX922) in size and weight, and even that printer gives me trouble carrying it.

 

My big question is: what will I need to get this printer up and running with my Macs? I tried locating a driver for it on Macintosh Garden, but no luck. Was a standard "one size fits all" LaserWriter driver used? I would really love to get this thing running so I can use it with my SuperSE for page layout and document printing.

 

With that said, the seller mentioned I will need to use Adobe Type Manager for best print quality. I'm assuming I just download it and install it on the host?

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