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North Hedge Ned

Different Macintosh in Original User Guide?

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The standard feet on my units here are not even installed.  The feet that are there really look like the ones on my the Apple II series, and even on the bottom of the ProFIle drives and maybe even the Disk II's.  As for the faceplate, I had not noticed that yet.  Interesting input everyone - thank you.  My long torx is on its way.  Hope to have the units opened by the end of the week. Stay Tuned, and keep the input coming - very interesting.  

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I agree Trash - after I read and replied I looked up on the web.  The front of mine looks the same a photos of released 128K's.  Actually, my vents look the same too.  The guts will tell the story I think.  Slight difference that I see in venting is where the serial number would typically be.  Very slight, but the vents under the floppy on mine are all cut out slits.  Released versions seem to have more solid plastic intact.

 

I think this may very well be a Twiggy bucket, then venting applied, with a release ready front.

 

Oh I can't wait for my torx to arrive so I can get inside these things!

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The vents are different. Notice on production there are a couple wider bands, North's are all thin.

IMG_5163.thumb.JPG.c281810a13a0483dac21b8920f6927c0.JPG

Edited by unity

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On 5/26/2019 at 12:58 PM, unity said:

Remember, the early 128ks had a "heat diffuser" along the top of the sweep board. There was a soft-recall where it was removed when a Mac went in for service because it was causing failures of the sweep boards by trapping heat. I am pretty sure that diffuser is also a relic of the deign with no vents  .  .  .  The second revision 128k (no, not the boded 128k) did not even have it installed, just the holes on the board remained.

Interesting, does your original,, first year DrexelMac have the diffuser or just the holes? My Branded DrexelMac doesn't appear to have the holes. Is the 512k/ke front bezel indistinguishable from the 128k's? Mine may well have started life as a FatMac before its Plus upgrade and accelerator installation?

 

Quote

So I can just imagine what having no vents was causing to the boards! It would also explain why the rearward vents never had a proper finish. Look at any 128k, even the ones in this thread, and you can see the vents changed in size and the mold has casting marks that were never properly polished up from that change. They were narrowed to match the top vent inserts because the top ones could not be as wide due to the case design. So rear vents narrowed to match better with the new top vents. Being a rouge unit, I dont think the original Mac really went though as much testing like machines of today do. And with Jobs so set on his ways I can see his distain for vents as it would detract from the look.

Interesting points about the rear chamfer vents.

 

I've been wondering about the dateline of the examples. Prototyping and testing of the case was far in advance of software development.

 

1981 - Steve took over the project in January 1981, and the Macintosh entered the post-Jef era, on track to becoming a real product.

1882 - In February 1982, it was finally time to release the design (Case) for tooling.

1982 - in August 1982, he (Burrell Smith) quickly designed the fifth iteration of the Macintosh, the one that actually shipped in January 1984

1983 - Sony's new 3.5 inch drive that they started to ship in the spring of 1983 through Hewlett-Packard  .  .  .

1983 - By the fall of 1983, we had committed to announcing and shipping the Macintosh at Apple's next annual shareholder's meeting, to be held on January 24th, 1984.

1984 - January 24, 1984 - the big day had finally arrived.

 

So the shift from 5.25" Twiggy for the Mac to the 3.5" Sony form factor happened somewhere between spring and early summer of 1983 giving only a few months for development of the 128k front bezel. Methinks the Macintosh vanity plate would have been changed in that same time frame.

Edited by Trash80toHP_Mini

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All my early Macs in hand have the diffuser installed. Both the Drexel I have and the one I just sold. But I have had more regular Macs come though my hands with it removed. You can easily see the solder work done to remove it. It seems until the last 10 years or so people did not even notice the diffuser, it was pretty rare to find one. Even now its not terribly common but more common than the dark grey sweep board cover sheet or copper ground clip (between sweep and frame, hold two black screws).

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On May 24, 2019 at 9:44 PM, North Hedge Ned said:

Hi All,

 

I am very puzzled here.  Everyone take a look at the picture here of the guy in the class room that shows the rear of an Original Macintosh from the User Manual [...]

Notice anything strange?  There is no large product product label on the back.  Now, all of the other photos in the book that show the rear, have the label on the back.  There is also something more strange.

A bunch of photos in the User's Guide show people using Twiggy Macs. Look carefully and you can see the larger 5.25" opening.

 

Also, on your Macintosh and on other pre-release Macintosh cases, notice the position of the modem port and printer port are swapped. The modem port ended up being on the outside in production Macintosh, but it is on the inside on the pre-release models.

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On May 26, 2019 at 9:45 AM, unity said:

I won't give advise one way or the other on this given its a prototype shell, but I never use case splitters because they often scratch/nick the interface between the two haves. I wont even buy a Mac if its chewed up like that. I always lay face down and do the slap on the side as I lift technique and let the weight of the CRT/internals anchor the faceplate down as the bucket pops off.

This is the official Apple Service method to open a compact Mac case.

 

In summary: the only tool you use is the screwdriver. You don't pry, or slap or shake, or do any other wonky thing. It's simple.

Edited by Dog Cow

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You merely loosen the 2 top and bottom screws, then use the screwdriver to apply downward force on the screw head, while with your other hand you pull up on the top handle of the case.

 

The screws never need to leave the case. You simply lift the case straight up, and set it down in the same way. Then you set the RFI shield on top so you don't forget to reinstall it.

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Oh, also speaking of vents - again. Check your side vents along the bottom. They were in groups of three on early ones and later it was one long vent on each side.

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Never noticed that, both the painted and 3.5" FDD adapted TwiggyMacs have vent triads, but there's no side view of the unvented TwiggyMac on 'fritter.

 

Did any of the shipping Macs have the Apple Logotype with rainbow badge to its right?

Did all shipping Macs say Macintosh with the rainbow badge at the left?

 

073vi.jpg&key=87a87228e6af7110b877e6e877

 

mac-6.JPG?auto=format,compress&fit=max&h

 

dscn0152.jpg

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Well the prototype is just that so I doubt the badging was anything official and more or less a parts bin grab to dress it up, possible well after it was made.

All shipping Macs had the logo left/badge on the right. Even the ones made in December of 1983. The only thing that really changed in the cases that were "official", beyond very minor mold adjustments, were the signatures. But I think we all know how those changed over time.

By the way Trash, that pic you posted of the 128k is a good example of those reward top vents being revised but the molding work to clean it up being poor. You can see the outline of the longer original vents from cases with no top vents. If you look at later molds they were cleared up for two reasons. More molds were made to increase production yields and they simply got around to polishing the original molds up when they had more molds in production and could pull them from the line. Given the level of perfection, I am really surprised Jobs let that very visible cosmetic flaw through.

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Not sure we're using the same terminology:

______________________     ____________

|  _____                  |    |    ____     |

|  |____|.   apple      |    |   |____|    |

|_____________________|    |___________|

  apple logotype    Rainbow Badge

____________    _______________________________________

|   _____    |    |.                                               |

|   |____|.   |    |       Macintosh.                         |

|_ _________|.   |______________________________________|

   Badge              Macintosh Vanity Plate

 

Question was which had what? Did any shipping units have the prototype configuration at the top or were all units shipped in the Vanity Plate configuration? Mix-n-match is not possible between logotype and vanity configurations.

 

30 minutes ago, unity said:

If you look at later molds they were cleared up for two reasons. More molds were made to increase production yields and they simply got around to polishing the original molds up when they had more molds in production and could pull them from the line. Given the level of perfection, I am really surprised Jobs let that very visible cosmetic flaw through

SJ had lost much control over cost of parts and production decisions for the release version:

  -  Scully & Co. cheapened the Mac to a 128k memory ceiling - engineers retained provisions for 512k on the Logic Board

  -  Somebody spec'd the smaller, less expensive (marginal?) Flyback Transformer of the shipping versions - engineers retained (built in?) provisions for upgrade on A/B

 

Like @Gorgonops said, Commodore would have shipped just about anything to unsuspecting customers. Scully would have done much the same, but not for customers? My theory is that all buckets used in the prototyping process were shot in far less expensive soft tooling without texture. Texture prototyping would have been done to that soft tooling and frozen after after approval for the very large investment in hard tooling for production. For cost savings/maximization of capital expenditures and time on the presses, the textured soft tooling would then have been used to shoot anywhere from a few hundreds to low thousands of buckets for internal use and seed units for programming such as the two examples in question

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Logo is .

Badge is name = Macintosh

 

All shipping units looked the same from the start of shipping to the next revision. For example, look at the very earliest production Macs that had the employee plaques on the back. Same design as one made two month later. As for tooling, you are forgetting the time this was done. Its not really like today with set processes for development and Apple was incredibly wasteful back then, but only because they were also incredibly profitable. Yes, normally texturing is done as a last step in mold design. But just look at all the variations in the prototypes that have texturing. I think a runaway budget has something to do with this. Also we do not know ho many prototype cases where made of each revision. Its only a guess. But hundreds or thousands seems incredibly unlikely in the early stages.

DTT7cHKUQAAwt3Y.jpg-large-780x1040.jpg

Edited by unity

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FYI the last revision done was the Apple logo square badges. You can see in some early press photos the front has a dark logo background just like the back Apple logo does. Shipping models have two different logo background colors, a light and dark version. Or its that the very earliest "finished" units were simply installed wrong off the line. You can see there was some back and forth on the background colors.

Edited by unity

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Interesting, but I prefer my more specific use of terms given that the Apple Computer Company "logo" changed over time, containing the name in text for the Apple/// and Twiggy Bucketet. It started out with Newton sitting under his tree and becoming merely Apple Inc. with monochromatic "logo." The Rainbow Apple would have originally be a symbol contained therein. When you receive a corporate identity spec sheet the terms can be intermixed. Granted Logo has come to mean a mere symbol, ofttimes meaningless without the remainder of the Logotype as in the case of myriad striated circles so prevalent in the Nineties giving little if no connection to corporate identity without accompanying text.

 

But I'll go along with your terms as I'm sure they reflect common use, degeneration of technical terminology over time, similar to the term Font, the designation for a typeface family having become synonymous with what is technically a Typeface in common usage.

 

Meanwhile, what was the final positioning or the Modem/Printer ports for shipping units?

 

I've never really been interested in the badly RoadAppled stock 128k, only in the prototypes and mods that were done out of necessity to morph them into usable computers.

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Well its is a logo. When people say Apple logo they mean . I dont get why this is even a debate or even coming up. The Macintosh is a product of Apple. The word "Macintosh" is not a logo.

 

I guess I will bow out of this thread that went off the rails.

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2 hours ago, Trash80toHP_Mini said:

Interesting, but I prefer my more specific use of terms given that the Apple Computer Company "logo" changed over time...

Trash:

 

You are certainly free to use language however you see fit, but arguing about your personal definition of words when they vary significantly from what most people mean when they use them generally is not a useful sideline in a thread like this. When discussing the cases of a computer probably the most applicable terminology would be that used to describe the words and symbols you find on car bodies, and in that sphere a "Logo" is this:

ford-150x150.png

or

 

inf-150x150.png

 

IE, stylized text or a graphic that's associated with the company name, while a "Badge" can be either this:

 

mustang-150x150.png

IE, a picture unique to that specific model, or this:

 

OEM-Factory-Genuine-Stock-Ford-Taurus-em

Text, again usually specific to the model in question.

 

(And yes, some specific cars might ship with only their model badge on them, in that case I suppose you could call that model-specific thing the "Logo", but this is the general rule.)

 

Clearly the rainbow-color Apple on any variation here is not unique to the Macintosh so it seems to me very little point in arguing when someone calls it the "Logo". As to the "Badge" saying "Apple" on those prototypes my wild guess is that they stuck that redundant text there because they may well have still been arguing whether "Macintosh" was actually going to be the shipping name for the product when this revision of the bucket tooling was made. (Folklore.org says that debate was mostly settled by January 1983, but it also says that the initial hard tooling was completed in February 1982. They probably designed it so that section of it could be swapped out when they arrived at the final name, and given the churn with regard to vent placement, etc, it may well be that they were still churning out prototype cases with molds incorporating the "Apple" un-badged sections until pretty late in the process.)

 

 

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Churn is a good word choice for what was going on with the project in general. Initial hard tooling being done in 1982 doesn't make sense unless it was for the TwiggyMac. Which article was that in? When I went through them the Sony drive wasn't even available in 1982, being released in Spring 83. I wonder how early they had a pre-release drive for SJ to decide he needed to have Alps do a proprietary knockoff of it?

Quick, Hide In This Closet!

George Crow, the analog engineer who designed the Mac's analog board, had come from HP prior to working at Apple and was sold on the superiority of the Sony drives. He procured a drive from his friends at HP and proposed to Bob Belleville that we figure out how to interface it to the Mac as soon as possible, while we negotiate a deal with Sony.

So who knows how long they had to work out the final front bezel? Dunno, but it's interesting to try to piece together the prototype timeline.

 

 

 

 

Not arguing at all, Logotype and Logo have been confuzzled to the point that "Logotype Logo" is apparently now a thing! Why the fuss anyway? I'd already said I'd go along with unity's terms. [;)]

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/logotype

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/logo

 

gen-Apple-Logo-Evolution.jpg

 

50-excellent-circular-logos note that many in this selection have absolutely nothing to do with corporate identity other than adding a splash of color to the letterhead, AT&T logo being the worst of the lot from that time period.

 

On Typeface vs. Font, never say surrender!
 

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2 hours ago, Trash80toHP_Mini said:

Initial hard tooling being done in 1982 doesn't make sense unless it was for the TwiggyMac. 

Why would it not be for the Twiggy version? They had every intention of selling it that way and made quite a lot of them for developers to use. Also, you are aware that dimensionally the Twiggy equipped versions are identical to the Sony ones, right? Even most of the metal chassis is the same, it's obvious where they wedged an adapter into the 5 1/4" drive bay.

 

Yes, it is a little weird and wasteful that they continued evolving the case as much as they did after going to hard tooling, but remember how much money they were burning and how they were having to deal with balancing the whims of a perfectionist control freak against harsh reality in areas like ventilation. It was inevitable that they'd have an abnormal number of redos.

 

And, yes, obviously, changing the drive hole was a really late and major redo. But no other panel of the case needed to be changed at the same time, there is absolutely nothing stopping you from mixing a twiggy era bucket with a Sony front panel. I have little doubt that at any given time they had several different versions of every die lying around the shop they were using to turn out small batches of skins.

 

Quote

Which article was that in?

The same date appears in both "Signing Party" and "More like a Porsche".

 

2 hours ago, Trash80toHP_Mini said:

Why the fuss anyway

Let's just say it wasn't particularly productive. I also can't help but be amused how that picture of Apple logos over the years is completely counter to your argument that the little Apple should be called the "badge". 

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17 hours ago, Trash80toHP_Mini said:

Meanwhile, what was the final positioning or the Modem/Printer ports for shipping units?

 

Final layout had the modem port next to the sound out port.

 

9 hours ago, Gorgonops said:

The same date appears in both "Signing Party" and "More like a Porsche".

Andy Hertzfeld's recollection of dates, as with most people, isn't always spot-on and I've found a couple of instances while doing research for the Mac 512K Blog where he had some wrong dates in his Folklore blog.

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11 hours ago, Trash80toHP_Mini said:

When I went through them the Sony drive wasn't even available in 1982, being released in Spring 83. I wonder how early they had a pre-release drive for SJ to decide he needed to have Alps do a proprietary knockoff of it?

Quick, Hide In This Closet!

My research on MFS and the Sony drive uncovered the following dates:

- May 1983: Larry Kenyon adapts Twiggy driver for Sony

- June 1983: conditional assembly switch added to assemble driver for either Twiggy or Sony

- August 1983: Larry Kenyon added support for double-sided Sony drives

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