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What to do about this Zip Drive in my G4?

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My Power Macintosh G4 Sawtooth came with an internal Zip drive, but it doesn’t work.  I installed IomegaWare under OS 9 and I could see the drive light up and make noise, but IomegaWare told me there was no disk.  The disks I was using were NOS Fujifilm PC formatted Zip 100 disks.  The front flap of the drive fell inside it at some point, but I was able to get that piece out.  When I realized the drive wasn’t working, I disconnected the power and data cables from it.  I intended to remove it, but I couldn’t figure out how to get it out, so I let it stay in there.

 

 I’m now wondering if I should attempt to fix this drive or if I should remove it?  What do you guys think?  I don’t own any other Zip disks or drives.

 

Thanks in advance.

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I believe Zip drives (from what I remember about the earlier ones; click-of-death and such) were somewhat unreliable.  I would just remove it personally.  Flash/thumb/jump/whatever drives are so much more useable and compatible across machines compared to an 'ole Zip disk.  Mind you, you might want to replace it if you're using it to move data between it and an older Mac with a SCSI-based Zip drive.

 

I think (based on my B&W being similar) that the faceplate is held on by clips inside and then the drive slides out the front (once you unscrew it that is).

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If the drive's not working at all, just replace it with and IDE interface Zip250. Authenticity is not to be undervalued. Pick up a USB250 and have at it! But toss the disks you tried in it just in case. Buy a USB250 and a SCSI100 and have at it.

 

Click of Death appears to have been due to the deletion of a component deemed unnecessary when the original drive was kicked into high production. They had to call the original design engineer back to address the problem. He was reputed to have been horrified that a very important component had been removed. I've got a several in service: original SCSI100, a SCSI/IDE version and a few internal IDE250s in service along with a pair of USB 250s.SCSI100s and a pair of IDE250s after market adapted to SCSI, I don't any drive induced problems at all after having the second of my original pair replaced under warranty after having chewed up a couple of disks. ISTR chewing up a drive with a 90s era death clicked Zip100 disk, but don;t remember what drive model was affected at all. That was fairly recent and there may be a thread about it?

 

Cory's gonna insist that the Zip is the most unreliable and about the least cost effective form of removable storage from the era. He may even begrudgingly admit that my position that ubiquity has a quality all its own may have some merit. ;)

 

< TLDR >

That's a riff on the Cold War theory that "numbers have a quality all their own." Which refers to the situation that a whole bunch of NATO's really excellent Armored Fighting Vehicles were tasked with holding off unrelenting hoards of their decidedly inferior Russian counterparts at the Fulda Gap. Not cool at all, but the Israelis managed to pull that off and then some when surprise attacked in the Yom Kippur War and then beat the Arab hoards of Soviet Tanks all the way back to the far edge of the Golan Heights in one of most epics feats of arms in the history of mobile warfare.

< /TLDR >

 

Long story short, I'll play the Russian side in Germany any time, but the Sabras are a different story entirely. So go team Zip  .  .  .  most of the time anyway. :approve:

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As predicted, my recommendation is to take the drive out and throw it out, or let it sit and never put another disk in. There's no good reason to have it on most vintage Macs, when networking hardware is faster, more convenient, and reliable. Maybe you can sell the rest of the disks on the trading post or eBay.

 

In this case specifically: A Power Macintosh G4 will have USB ports, to which you can connect an SD/CF card reader, USB based external hard disk, or flash drives, all of which are going to be more reliable.

 

I think this might be the thread jt is referring to:

 

Largely, jt isn't wrong about my stance on Zip. It's close to, if not the least reliable data storage format from that era, save for perhaps a few instant flops, such as Castlewood Orb.

 

If it wasn't Click of Death, it was one of a handful of other problems the drives and disks suffered because Iomega, full of itself after a few years of making reasonable money from their well-engineered products, decided they could build something a bit less well-engineered, which would sell to more people for a bigger overall profit margin.

 

In pursuit of that goal, Iomega essentially bought their position of market dominance by practically giving the drives to computer OEMs and then, again, practically giving the disks to retailers.

 

It was an extremely clever use of the tools Capitalism provides, but I'm also a little bit convinced that when the category finally died, it took out good, well-engineered solutions like LS-120/240, HiFD200, and UHD144 with it.

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It's probably best not to go reading that thread unless you have a lot of time, because it's a bit of a doozy, and ultimately, it's best to be aware that literally anyone can write whatever they want, believe what they just wrote is a fact, and then draw false conclusions based on that.

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One more follow-up.

 

My most thorough run-down on why you should consider not using Zip, and co-convened into the same post, why jt is not a good source for information on Zip drives is available in this specific post:

 

It boils down to, even in 1998 MacWorld knew that Zip was the least reliable superfloppy/cartridge format and at the time, it was also the most expensive.

 

Iomega was only barely able to employ the Gillette/InkJet model to make Zip a viable business -- the entire thing quickly imploded because disks cost enough that people would buy a few and then just stop, which is part of what made the MacWorld sidebar about saving your money and getting more space by just getting another internal hard disk most interesting to me.

 

If you've got time to pull the Zip drive out, the easiest thing to put in its spot would be another hard disk, if you've got a reason to want more fast local storage on that machine.

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That's hilarious. That post sums up exactly why I think your utter disdain for the Zip is misguided and that you're no more a reliable source for info on the Zip than I because of prejudice based on mistaken assumptions about the history of Zip in the 90s. BTW, you mentioned Bernoullini in that post, that was Iomega's bread and butter product while Syquest ruled the removable roost. Melding of Bernoulli tech with acquired optical tracking tech is what wound up being the Zip, which blew Syquest out of the water as a major contender in the removables marketplace.

 

Quoting a low end consumer oriented MacWorld magazine article leveraging four years of hindsight and applying it in 1998 after what had been a revolutionay, if not a sea change in the removable marketplace is no argument. A more technically oriented MacUser article would bear some weight, not so much a dumbed down MacWorld piece unabashedly flogging newer products.

 

I've loved and been involved with the Zip from before its 1994 into, and you hate it. You think networking is the answer to everything and I've hated dealing with it since the 1987 AppleTalk/PhoneNet era. So it goes. [:P]

 

For the regular guy, cost of media is a far less a concern than the ubiquity placing media at the Staples a three mile drive form the drive. I've  granted you the cost effectiveness of other removable media solutions for professional use.

 

Iomega didn't give the drives to Apple for free. Had CD entry cost come down and market penetration increased so fast, you would have seen internal SCSI Zips entirely replace Floppy drives on the platform and the WinTel platform would have followed right along. LS-120 was a better candidate, but came into the game far too late for more than its very limited success.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Returning to the topic at hand:

I don't know what you'd like to do with your dead Zip, but f I didn't want to replace a borked Zip in one of my G4s, there would be a powered USB hub and stereo jacks hot glued behind that bezel in a heartbeat. :approve:

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I've always found the zip drive/disk (100mb) very useful for old Mac tinkering, I have to say. Never had one fail, but I will confess that my usage is only occasional, for software installers and the like.

 

Back in the day, a 100mb zip was serious kit. My hard drive in the early 90s afforded a grand total of 80mb of storage.

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Sure, networking is great... when it is up and running.  But as far as I know, there is no way to network boot a Macintosh Plus.  And it is a heck of a lot easier to find a computer that is capable of working with Zip 100 disks (SCSI, USB, IDE drives all exist for both PC and Mac) when compared to finding a computer that can work with 800kb floppy disks.

 

I have personally used the Zip drives on both my Quick Silver and Beige G3 to create boot disks/install disks for machines as old as the Plus (my oldest Mac) to various pre PCMCIA slot PowerBook models, SEs and SE/30s, Color Classics, PowerMac 6100s, etc.  A great utility to have when 800k disks hold a pathetic amount of data (even though my Beige G3 can write them), 1.4mb disks are barely better, and my Apple CD 300e has yet to ever read a CD-RW (and I generally don't care to use a whole CD-R for less than 50mb of data, seems like a waste).

 

So yes... networking is great if the machine has the hardware for it and everything is up and running.  I even use it to push files between a MacBook Pro running 10.14 and an SE running 7.1.  But there are zero chances I'm giving up my Zip drives and disks.

 

Also, I've yet to ever have a Zip drive or disk fail on me.  Now Iomega Jaz drives are a different story.  The 1gb external drives are probably the most fragile piece of hardware I've ever interacted with.

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I am proud to count myself in the "cursed" pile as far as Zip drives failing and getting on board that sweet class action lawsuit against Iomega over how awful their drives were. It was maybe $12 from what I can recall? Easiest earned $12 I had, anyway.

 

For a G4 you can get a CompactFlash card that can be read from your USB 1.1 ports, or for much better speed get a cheap adapter that plugs in through one of the two ATA ports on the logic board which I was able to find in Fry's for less than ten bucks. I've had Rhapsody and Mac OS 9.x purring along nicely like this.

 

That doesn't cover what to do with the slot that normally houses a Zip drive. Still, it's how I handle external storage. IDE to CF and SCSI to CF are also reasonably priced and pretty easy to come by.

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Sure, as I mentioned in the linked thread: if you've got 'em, use 'em. If you don't have 'em, it's not worth getting into it. A 7.5NAD diskette and a serial cable cost less than what you might spend setting up a not-already-extant Zip ecosystem and works on everything supporting SuperDisk. a 6.0.8 NAD could probably be set up for use on, say, the Plus.

 

There's also options like the floppyemu and of course the SCSI2SD.

 

You can also get a CD and boot 7.1 or 7.5 with network access that way, and given how cheap CD-Rs are, you can just label and keep the CD.

 

To the extent that I think it's worth litigating this again, I'm going to address this point because it's new relative to the other thread:

 

4 hours ago, Trash80toHP_Mini said:

Melding of Bernoulli tech with acquired optical tracking tech is what wound up being the Zip, which blew Syquest out of the water as a major contender in the removables marketplace.

As far as I know, neither Zip nor Bernoulli had optical tracking. That was functionality LS-120 ("laser servo") had. Bernoulli's big deal was that it pumped air through the drive and the cartridge to force physical separation between the drive head and the spinning platter, making it so that the thing click-of-death zip disks did, the drive heads would rip through the disk media, Bernoulli drives were physically incapable of doing.

 

Because of that, Bernoulli is reputed to be near physically indestructible. Bernoulli is also reputed to be faster than Zip, also it ultimately shipped up to 230 megabytes. I wonder if there's any post-mortem out there that talks about why Iomega killed Bernoulli. It stayed onboard as the high end professional product for the first couple years of Zip's life. (While Iomega was also still making home-focused tape backup derived from Travan technology, along with MO and Syquest 44/88/105-compatible cartridges.)

 

Syquest stayed relevant for a couple more years, but, yes, ultimately they floundered and couldn't ship a reliable enough next-generation product and folded. Had Syquest made it, their entry would've been a 3.5-inch cartridge that held around 4.7 gigs. I forget what pricing was supposed to be like, but this was going to be their competitor to Jaz 2GB.

 

Iomega made Zip worse at every step of the way by trying to cost-reduce the drives enough to make the razor blade model work. In the end, they just guessed wrong how people would use it and that caused lots of problems for the company. As I mentioned in the other thread, they fired their CEO over the issue.

 

4 hours ago, Trash80toHP_Mini said:

Iomega didn't give the drives to Apple for free.

Doesn't have to be $0 for it to be dumping.

 

Ultimately though, 

---

I'd be highly interested if you can come up with a source that suggests there was a version of zip, as a technology, that was going to be as solid as you claim it was. Everything I've ever been able to find suggests otherwise. I've literally never heard of Zip outside of it being a cost-reduced technology aimed mainly at consumers. For everyone saying they haven't had problems with it in modern times (I'm in that group by the way) the usage patterns I see are way lower than what Zip is documented as having been "for" in the '90s and there's also a certain amount of survivor bias: The drives and cartridges that are still around are more or less the ones that didn't die 10-15 years ago.

 

That doesn't mean that it was a good technology or that it's the best choice for these tasks or that, again, we should be endorsing its introduction into environments that don't already have it.

 

In this specific thread, the problem is that jt is always quick to, at any mention of zip whatsoever, encourage someone to build up an entire zip ecosystem for no good reason. The machine in question is a power macintosh g4. Those computers have firewire, usb, ide, and PCI slots, and near universally: working CD and DVD drives. There's any number of better solutions available for them. OP mentioned no context whatsoever, just a single isolated machine with a single isolated component failure.

 

 

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Just because I don't have the energy to have this discussion, please refrain from replying unless you are @MacFox providing additional details.

 

Otherwise, this thread should be considered completed.

 

jt has offered the customary "you should add zip to it, regardless of the context" and I have offered my customary "you should think really hard about what the context is because unless zip is already in play it's not the best choice".

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Cory5412 said:

As far as I know, neither Zip nor Bernoulli had optical tracking. That was functionality LS-120 ("laser servo") had.

Both were three years apart releases of existing floptical technology. I never heard anything about Bernoulli having it. LS-120 folded laser tracking to the floptical recipe. but after three years that benefit and even 1.44 FDD compatibility were not enough to make it a viable contender. Zip didn't take itself or any market down much less any other removable drive technology. CD/RW wiped the floor clean of all other contenders.

 

18 minutes ago, Cory5412 said:

I'd be highly interested if you can come up with a source that suggests there was a version of zip, as a technology, that was going to be as solid as you claim it was. Everything I've ever been able to find suggests otherwise. I've literally never heard of Zip outside of it being a cost-reduced technology aimed mainly at consumers.

Since when is a low cost, readily available technology for consumers a thing to be reviled? That was it's marketing strategy! It only wound up being a staple of every Service Bureau on the planet because it was used everyone from high end professionals all the way on down to lowly consumers insisted on bringing the damn things through their door.

 

I never said it was rock solid, entirely dependable technology, though it was and still is a lot more reliable than the Floppy Disk. It was BIG, FAST, readily available and affordable in 1994!  Gimme a break about comparisons with more recent technology. Folks who used the Zip Drive back in the day were mostly happy with and quiet about them. Those who were burned or even heard about someone who had been second or third hand was mostly an "expert" wannabe who shot their mouths off about it like complainers drowning any other opinion out of discussions on the net today.

 

I've admitted I was burned in the period when the click of death was a problem and covered under warranty. The issue was fixed and yes, drives that were made under spec that hadn't failed under warranty probably insisted on doing so over the next ten years or so, perpetuating th the OMG, the CLICK OF DEATH!!!! mythology..

 

Yes, it was real, yes was serious, yes it was fixed, yes it hurt IOMEGA and its shareholders and it was also blown all out of proportion, becoming a thing of Myth.

 

BTW, I've never seen anyone but you insist they were giving the drives away, got links?

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I was busy typing when you posted that. I've been burned too many times losing posts when trying to see a reply made while I'm typing. I'll drop it now.

 

BTW, I DID suggest duct taping a powered USB hub in there behind the bezel in lieu of a replacement drive when I went back on topic after my previous reply. Actually it was hot glue and I'm dead serious. Designing a computer case without a USB plug for a thumb drive on the front bezel of a G4 was like designing a car without cupholders.

 

IIRC they did that in the Countache  .  .  .   um  .  .  .  wait a sec  .  .  .  Jony isn't working on automotive design is he? 8-o

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1 hour ago, Cory5412 said:

Just because I don't have the energy to have this discussion, please refrain from replying unless you are @MacFox providing additional details.

 

Otherwise, this thread should be considered completed.

 

jt has offered the customary "you should add zip to it, regardless of the context" and I have offered my customary "you should think really hard about what the context is because unless zip is already in play it's not the best choice".

 

 

 

I’m neutral when it comes to Zip. I never owned a Zip drive until I got this Mac.  I transfer files to my oldest Macs via my Powerbook G3 PDQ and on that machine I use either standard floppies or AppleTalk to move files to/from my SE or Classic II.  

 

I already get more convenient USB ports thanks to my monitor, So I don’t know what I would use to fill the space  the Zip drive currently occupies. I suppose I could move the second HDD up to that space.  Would that work? Or Would the HDD be too exposed?  

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There are "real" 3.5-inch bay USB hubs that exist, such as https://www.startech.com/Cards-Adapters/USB-3.0/Hubs/USB-3-Front-Panel-4-Port-Hub-35-5-25-inch-Drive-Bay~35BAYUSB3S4 This is the first one that came up, but if you dug deeper (and probably on eBay) you could likely find a USB 2.0 one.

 

Someone could pair that with a USB card, maybe, or opt for a multi-card reader. No duct tape would even need to be involved. The thing I'd say is that you'd probably want to just pop out the Zip portion of the bezel, or if it makes getting to the optical drive easier anyway, run without that part of the bezel entirely.

 

Apple's bezels for Zip disks tended to hide the "kind of important if something goes wrong" eject button. My own Beige G3 has that bezel removed and stowed removed for access to the eject button, for the occasion when someone brings me a Zip to read.

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The HDD would work in that space. I don't know if I'd bother with the effort of moving an existing, already working HDD into that spot, but it could be a good place for a third or fourth one, depending on what your system has in terms of trays on the bottom. A hard disk wouldn't be too exposed in that area.

 

Also, +1 for monitor USB ports. I like to use Dell Ultrasharp LCDs and those usually have 4-port USB hubs on them.

 

So, it wouldn't hurt anything to just leave the broken drive in, or take it out and leave the hole on the front, or buy a replacement bezel for that section that covers that space. My B&W ran with a Zip bezel but no drive for years. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Cory5412 said:

There are "real" 3.5-inch bay USB hubs that exist, such as https://www.startech.com/Cards-Adapters/USB-3.0/Hubs/USB-3-Front-Panel-4-Port-Hub-35-5-25-inch-Drive-Bay~35BAYUSB3S4 This is the first one that came up, but if you dug deeper (and probably on eBay) you could likely find a USB 2.0 one.

That one actually looks like it might work, but the iterative process of fitment would about do me in. Better to open it once, test fit and then epoxy the sucker together.

 

1 hour ago, Cory5412 said:

Apple's bezels for Zip disks tended to hide the "kind of important if something goes wrong" eject button. My own Beige G3 has that bezel removed and stowed removed for access to the eject button, for the occasion when someone brings me a Zip to read.

That's he thing about the QS that most drives me crazy. Lack of access to the CD eject button on top of that is just unbelievable!

 

Back on topic. Post an offer to trade your Zip bezel for a Blank in the trading post to cover up the hole! That'd be a first AFAIK, listings i've seen have been requests for zip bezels. I'm almost surprised nobody has yet sent you a trade offer in PM

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On 12/16/2018 at 9:16 PM, Cory5412 said:

There are "real" 3.5-inch bay USB hubs that exist, such as https://www.startech.com/Cards-Adapters/USB-3.0/Hubs/USB-3-Front-Panel-4-Port-Hub-35-5-25-inch-Drive-Bay~35BAYUSB3S4 This is the first one that came up, but if you dug deeper (and probably on eBay) you could likely find a USB 2.0 one.

 

I do not understand how this thing is suppose to work.  I have a Sonnet PCI card with a internal USB 2.0 port on it.  But how can one USB 2.0 port give you four USB 3.0 ports and the speed and current that they need? And what is that other connector I see on the back of the card?  The connector to the right of the USB plug?  Is that a SATA connector? 

 

I am looking for options for the open bay under the optical drive in my Blue & White.  A card reader, USB ports, a floppy drive, etc.  I want something that would fit and look nice....

 

mraroid

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You will only receive USB 2.0 speeds out of anything you connect to a USB 2.0 card, and you will only receive USB 1.1 speeds out of it if your'e booted to Classic Mac OS.

 

This thing probably gets power from SATA or Molex - if it's SATA, there are cheap Molex to SATA power adapters available, though they vary greatly in quality.

 

Interestingly, 900mA of power is almost nothing by USB 3.0 standards, but it'll be "fine" for most of what gets used with old Macs.

 

Unfortunately, the only thing that really "looks nice" by Apple and Mac standards is either the blank bezel or the Zip bezel. I run my B&W with a Zip drive installed morely because I never got around to finding a different bezel, and at this point, likely never will. Before I got my Zip drive, I briefly ran a third hard disk in that slot, but the machine whose disk that was needed it back. It looks "fine" if you put a hard disk behind the B&W Zip bezel, probably a little better than running the machine without the bezel entirely or sawing the opening wider to accommodate something else. Unfortunately, I don't know if any "run a generic drive in the slot" bezels were ever built. That was a thing a few Mac models had back in the time when there was more than just one or two types of devices you could put in bays.

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What C said about USB support levels. Interesting product there:

35BAYUSB3S4.bom.jpg

That's a loopback cable to hook the hub up to a backplane connector or the accessory "PEXUSB3S11 PCI Express card to provide an internal USB 3.0 port." The cube port on the back is for the oddball blue tipped USB3 connector on the loopback cable and next to it is the SATA power connector making it a powered hub.

 

If you have the stock (non-zip) cover plate for your B&W G3Zip bay you could have it laser cut to match the LED and Port openings from an AI file made by scanning the black front bezel of the hub for use as a template. Hardest part would be registering the openings to the B&W blank, but probably no biggie. If Ponoco or some other online outfit won't do it for you, a well equipped sign shop will probably take it on.

 

@Cory5412 I'm surprised you haven't installed an LS-120 behind your Zip bezel, doesn't it line up well enough?

 

edit: backside pic:

35BAYUSB3S4.B.jpg

Pretty slick, would that USB 3 hub act as a USB 1.1  Hub when hooked up to a USB 1.1 port?

Edited by Trash80toHP_Mini

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On 12/15/2018 at 12:35 PM, MacFox said:

My Power Macintosh G4 Sawtooth came with an internal Zip drive, but it doesn’t work.  I installed IomegaWare under OS 9 and I could see the drive light up and make noise, but IomegaWare told me there was no disk.  The disks I was using were NOS Fujifilm PC formatted Zip 100 disks.  The front flap of the drive fell inside it at some point, but I was able to get that piece out.  When I realized the drive wasn’t working, I disconnected the power and data cables from it.  I intended to remove it, but I couldn’t figure out how to get it out, so I let it stay in there.

 

 I’m now wondering if I should attempt to fix this drive or if I should remove it?  What do you guys think?  I don’t own any other Zip disks or drives.

Got your post mixed up with the running B&W G3 discussions. Same advice in your case, snag a blank plate for modification and have a go at installing any 3.5" device you desire with matched openings. If you don't care about having anything in there just pull the DOA drive out and leave the blank plate blank.

 

For anyone with a borked Zip in any IDE Mac, just replace it with any internal Zip 250 you find from anywhere. I've done the same with all my PowerBook Zip Modules. I swapped in the drives from Dell Zip 250 Modules I found cheap on eBay.

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2 minutes ago, Trash80toHP_Mini said:

The cube port on the back is for the oddball blue tipped USB3 connector on the loopback cable and next to it is the SATA power connector making it a powered hub.

That's a full-sized USB 3.0 Type A connector.

 

Seeing this full sized image, you are probably meant to connect this thing to a back port on your machine, rather than to a motherboard connector, or perhaps: you can do either way. Most modern PCs have fairly large holes in them with rubber grommets through which you can route a variety of cabling.

 

3 minutes ago, Trash80toHP_Mini said:

I'm surprised you haven't installed an LS-120 behind your Zip bezel, doesn't it line up well enough?

I never had an internal one, and to be perfectly honest, I don't know if trying to "make it fit" would have occurred to me. If I remember correctly, the Zip bezel is separable from the CD bezel in that era, so if I did have a working internal LS-120 drive for that machine, I would probably have just left off the bezel entirely.

 

 

 

 

 

Largely, this falls under the category of my advice where, whenever possible, I tend to recommend that most people avoid starting collections of vintage media for no good reason. This applies here, too, to be honest, you "could" put an LS-120 drive in a G3, I wouldn't do it unless you were using floppies extensively for some reason, or you already had an LS-120 ecosystem built up. Notably, I, personally, am engaged in building out a collection of different removable media, because the topic and the technologies interest me extensively, and I still haven't gotten any of my LS-120 drives working because I haven't bothered to buy the special cleaning disk, which you need to use the drive at all, because normal cleaning floppies will not work in those drives.

 

Plus, even if I had LS-120 working at the moment, on the Mac, the "authentic" LS-120 experience is buying one for an iMac because it's 1998 and LS-120 and a plain USB floppy are like a $10 difference. That particular blip, coupled with LS-120 actually shipping earlier than USB-based Zip drives, is Imation's main claim to fame. I think there were some PowerBook bay modules as well, but by volume, that's an extreme minority of the LS-120 drives that existed, I imagine.

 

USB floppy drives are that much better because, as I mentioned, they're easy to clean and they're generally still compatible with diskcopy6, and are still suitable for writing diskettes for a CC, but, if you have a network, I wouldn't even bother with that.

 

If someone wants to fill the void in a machine, the best way to do it is to place a Zip drive there and leave it unconnected, or if you have use for it/them, put a hard disk in that spot.

 

If someone just wants to know what'll go there, ultimately the answer is "not much that will do you any good."

 

Notably, the internal USB hub that's linked is like $60 and for that money you can either buy three or four of the USB 2.0 4-port hubs (powered) from Best Buy or you can buy a better external hub with a lot more ports. You could probably buy a better hub and a Zip100 drive to fill the void for $60, so which direction any particular person goes will depend a lot on their preferences.

 

 

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17 minutes ago, Cory5412 said:

I never had an internal one, and to be perfectly honest, I don't know if trying to "make it fit" would have occurred to me. If I remember correctly, the Zip bezel is separable from the CD bezel in that era, so if I did have a working internal LS-120 drive for that machine, I would probably have just left off the bezel entirely.

You've started to get me curious about LS-120 over the last couple of weeks, What got me all-in was G's or trag's mention of drag-n-drop ejection compatibility. I just tore apart the $4.99 Thrifted bare IMATION SuperDisk that's been collecting dust in the Blueberry Fields compilation on the corner of my headboard. Just as I thought, the Floppy will work just fine in the Zip opening. Jiggering the position of an aux. momentary contact switch to Zip position should be easily done. Even the flip up dustcover looks like an acceptable fit so it may not be necessary to remove it for a B&W mod.

 

For the other side of the experiment, widening the FDD opening a bit on the SuperDISK's front bezel almost looks like it was planned. Height of the opening is fine for ZIP as is, but the mold's two level config would make opening that up a bit easily done if more clearance is necessary. I'll be using a smallish external USB Zip 250 mechanism in there as planned for the iLamp transplant to the 17" StudioDisplay husk. It'll be used as an animated backdrop for that Supersized Blueberry iQuarium. That's the only use I have for the only X only, non 12" AluBook member of my collection. [}:)]

 

17 minutes ago, Cory5412 said:

If someone just wants to know what'll go there, ultimately the answer is "not much that will do you any good."

Dunno, I've got a couple of interesting front panel breakout units that could be quite useful. Things like USB/FW/Card Reader and A/V plugs are on them and a stereo headphone jack would just be to die for on the face of Jony's oversimplified minimalist VS. functionalist G4 front bezels.

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