Jump to content


Photo

Recapping gone wrong


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Challenger 1983

Challenger 1983
  • 6502

Posted 12 November 2017 - 05:53 PM

I pulled the negative pads on C18 and C139
Where do these traces go to


Regards

Attached Thumbnails

  • image.jpg

<p>Macintosh classic (broken). Macintosh LC ll. . iBook G3 clamshell. 2006 MacBookpro 15'. 2010 MacBookpro 13'Newton MessagePad 130. . iMac G3 iBook G4. PowerBook duo 210 . Duo dock plus/II Godspeed challenger (salutes)

#2 nyef

nyef
  • 6502

Posted 13 November 2017 - 03:21 AM

Looking at the picture you provided, they both have surface-level traces (easy to expose with a fibreglass pen or craft knife and solder a patch wire to), and both lead to VIAs (typically already exposed, and easy to solder a patch wire to).  Or if you're careful, you could even just leave one of the component legs for those radials you're using a bit long and use that instead of a patch wire.

 

Overall, this very much looks rescueable without reference to a circuit diagram or trying to do a pad repair.



#3 bibilit

bibilit
  • 68000
  • LocationParis area -FRANCE-

Posted 13 November 2017 - 01:00 PM

I don't want to be rude, but those caps are pretty bad and weldings poor.


Macintosh Classic and II ,CC, SE, SE/30,IIsi 25mhz(RasterOps video),Q 700,LC, LC III,LC475, PBook Wallstreet/Bronze/5300cs/1400c/100/Tibook Imac G3 slot-in, Bondi and G4 / PMac G4 sawtooth, QS, MDD, Yikes!, Cube, Imac Core 2 Duo, Ibook G3 (white/clam) G4 + Newton 120, eMate 300,Quicktake 150,  PowerCD


#4 Challenger 1983

Challenger 1983
  • 6502

Posted 13 November 2017 - 01:12 PM

I don't want to be rude, but those caps are pretty bad and weldings poor.

yeah I know I’m pretty bad at it
<p>Macintosh classic (broken). Macintosh LC ll. . iBook G3 clamshell. 2006 MacBookpro 15'. 2010 MacBookpro 13'Newton MessagePad 130. . iMac G3 iBook G4. PowerBook duo 210 . Duo dock plus/II Godspeed challenger (salutes)

#5 Macdrone

Macdrone
  • 68020
  • LocationKelso, Wa

Posted 14 November 2017 - 10:19 PM

looks like you need to clean more from the start and use more flux.  Just a suggestion.  When I am just trying to get boards to work I take shortcuts, but as you can see it never turns out very well.


Lots O' Macs, but now thinning the lots.


#6 IIfx

IIfx
  • 68000
  • LocationVA, USA

Posted 15 November 2017 - 05:08 AM

I would restart with proper SMD caps. Japanese aluminum polymer would be a way better choice instead of cheap generic electrolytic caps.

 

Solder paste makes these jobs much easier.



#7 PB145B

PB145B
  • 6502

Posted 15 November 2017 - 06:54 AM

100% agree with IIfx here.


Mac user for life!

#8 nyef

nyef
  • 6502

Posted 15 November 2017 - 02:59 PM

The first couple of times I recapped something, I used radial caps to replace SMD. It works, more or less, but tends to be ugly. In one case, I simply couldn't find compatible SMD caps, so had to use radials, and then had trouble getting the case closed. I very quickly got tired of buying "capacitor kits" for specific hardware, especially since sometimes they aren't quite right, and moved up to simply stocking a goodly range of capacitor values in common packages. With a little bit of practice, SMD, at least of this vintage, tends to be fairly easy to work with, as long as I can get my iron to the terminals (not always guaranteed with the way some boards are laid out).
 

Solder paste makes these jobs much easier.

I've never actually tried solder paste. I know that it supposedly works well with hot air, but does it also work well with an iron?  If so, I can absolutely see that simplifying things, simply because you have fewer things to either keep steady or move carefully at the same time.



#9 IIfx

IIfx
  • 68000
  • LocationVA, USA

Posted 16 November 2017 - 12:54 AM

Solder paste when used with a good iron will just magically melt and adhere to only the pad and the SMD contact leg. All you have to do is carefuly apply just enough paste, hold down the part with tweezers, apply heat with the iron to the pad and leg, and then clean the board to remove any remaining paste. Contact cleaner does the job cleaning.

 

99% of the solder paste will naturally gravitate to the pad and lead. It's amazing stuff.



#10 Floofies

Floofies

    Maker of Logos

  • 6502
  • LocationGeorgia, USA

Posted 16 November 2017 - 01:11 AM

Useful tip: Other than your usual goo cleaning (soap/water/alcohol) you can also get a big ball of solder going on the tip of the iron (broad flat tip preferred) and wipe the solder around the pads a lot. It will suck up any residual dirt if it's light enough, and then you can discard the extra solder. If you're not using any extra flux and only have a rosin-core solder or something, that also helps to get the area all flux-ed up.


Edited by Floofies, 16 November 2017 - 01:13 AM.

"Steve insists that we're shipping in early 1982, and won't accept answers to the contrary. The best way to describe the situation is a term from Star Trek. Steve has a reality distortion field."
Guy L. "BudTribble, 1981.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users