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JDW

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About JDW

  • Birthday 02/25/1971

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  • Website URL
    http://retromaccast.ning.com/profile/JamesWages

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Aichi-ken, Japan
  • Interests
    Church, family, travel around Japan, Mac computing, graphic design, web design, photography, videography, Newton 2100 PDA, System 6 fun on an SE/30

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  1. JDW

    Capacitor list for SE/30 analog board

    joethezombie put together a very nice list of caps for us (thank you, Joe!), but there are some problems that need to be considered for those who want to order all the caps today. I assembled the following information, which is valid as of today, October 3, 2018. SE/30 Analog Board Capacitor DigiKey List from joethezombie (see notes in bold in parenthesis): C18: 22uF 20% 50V AXIAL, 6.3x12mm (85°C max!) C11: 33uF 20% 25V AXIAL, 5x12mm (85°C max! Currently backordered. See replacement in Mouser list below.) C19: 10uF 20% 160V RADIAL, 10x16.5mm (backordered at Mouser!) C14: 4700uF 20% 25V RADIAL, 18x27mm C13,C24: 220uF 20% 16V RADIAL, 10x17.5mm (EOL & not stocked on Mouser!) C9: 1000uF 20% 16V RADIAL, 16x26.5mm (EOL & not stocked on Mouser!) C2,C7,C22,C25: 100UF 20% 25V RADIAL, 6.3x11mm C15: 3.9uF 5% 250VDC RADIAL, 23.8x13.5x20.8 (LxDxH) (Not stocked on Mouser!) EOL = End of Life, not recommended by manufacturer for new designs (obviously best to pick a different part) I wanted to see if pricing would be different on Mouser, since I've ordered with them before, and the good news is it's roughly the same, including shipping (shipping to Japan anyway). But when ordering from Mouser, some of the above capacitors are either not stocked or backordered. A similar set of caps that can be ordered from Mouser are these (note differences in bold): C18: 22uF 20% 50V AXIAL, 7.87x12.7mm (p/n: MAL213821229E3, DigiKey has no stock) C11: 33uF 20% 40V AXIAL, 7.87x12.7mm (p/n: MAL213827339E3, DigiKey has no stock) C19: 10uF 20% 160V RADIAL, 10x16mm (p/n: UCS2C100MPD) 8000hr C14: same p/n as in DigiKey list above C13,C24: 220uF 20% 16V RADIAL, 8x11.5mm (p/n: 860160374017) Wurth, 7000hr C9: 1000uF 20% 16V RADIAL, 10x20mm (p/n: 860080375019) Wurth, 5000hr C2,C7,C22,C25: same p/n as in DigiKey list above C15: 3.9uF 5% 450VDC RADIAL, 25.3x10.7x15.4 (LxDxH) (p/n: ECW-FD2W395J) NOTE1: "Wurth" is a German electronics manufacturer and a respected name in power supply components, especially for their coils. NOTE2: Organic polymer aluminum electrolytic capacitors are available but I avoided listing them as alternatives since their ESR is so low it could actually cause problems. I've not done circuit analysis to say that definitively for all the caps, but you're safe using regular caps that have normal ESR, which is what I listed above and is what Joe listed in his original list. When I have time, I need to see what will fit using the physical dimension data above. Physical size of the caps shouldn't be an issue, but LEAD SPACING and LEAD THICKNESS need to be considered. Feel free to share your thoughts on the lists above.
  2. JDW

    Modern PSU for the SE/30

    All the more reason to go with the SEASONIC SSP-250SUB...
  3. JDW

    Modern PSU for the SE/30

    Stock SE/30 PSU Specs: +5v = 6.0A +12Vsweep = 1.25A +12Vdisk = 2.1A -12V = 0.5A Any replacement PSU should have the same or larger current supply capability. Err on the side of LARGER.
  4. JDW

    Modern PSU for the SE/30

    I posted an appeal for SE/30 motherboard repair help in a new thread so as not to detract from this very important thread on replacement power supplies for the SE and SE/30. In that other thread I made it very clear that "I am not trying to speak negatively" of any one person, and that remains true. Both the thread title and the opening sentence in bold illustrated quite clearly my primary intent of getting boards repaired and nothing more. I have not held any grudges against anyone, nor have I been angry at anyone, nor did I ever ask for money back, nor have I really thought much about my two boards in the closet over the past few years since the day they were returned to me and I found they were unfortunately not fixed; which may have been caused during shipping -- I don't know. When I found they didn't work, I was very disappointed as anyone in my shoes would be. Sure, I groaned within myself about the lack of adequate packing material that would have prevented the two boards from banging against each other during intentionally shipping. Both boards exhibited the same exact SimasiMac they exhibited before I shipped them off for repair, which was at the root of my disappointment. But please understand that disappointment and anger are two different things. I never was angry nor bitter. If anything I merely had a heart of tremendous sorrow. To avoid creating trouble, and to avoid spending yet more money on two-way international shipping, and to avoid having to possibly wait another lengthy period of time for a 2nd repair attempt, I decided not to say anything a few years ago when those boards arrived back in my hands and I found they still both had SimasiMac. My decision at the time to say nothing was perhaps not the best course of action, but I cannot travel back in time to change that. I do not cast blame, directly or indirectly, nor was my post in that other thread any kind of thinly vailed stone throw at anyone. I only wanted to provide emotionally-neutral facts about past repairs that might assist other board-repair wizards to more appropriately advise me about what to do with my two non-working SE/30 motherboards. Nevertheless, strong offense was taken in that other thread and it was locked, preventing me from offering apologies or clarifications. I see now that I should have perhaps handled the situation differently. Indeed, I should have just left the two boards to sit in my closet and kept silent. I therefore can only apologize in this post, from the heart, to the individual offended, and to separately also apologize to all of my fellow vintage Mac lovers. My fumbled attempt at seeking repair help failed to consider the strong emotional reaction of others. I did not then nor do I now mean to sully anyone's good reputation. The individual who is now very upset with me over that other thread is a very important contributor in this forum and has been for many years, and he has helped countless people, and that is why I chose to send my SE/30 boards to him in the first place many years ago. I fully realized that my saying all of this is no magic cure for seriously hurt feelings that I alone have caused, but I felt I needed to say these words, especially in light of what CC_333 wrote. There's more I could say with my head hung low; but to avoid further offense, I shall shut-up about that topic because I've obviously said too much already. I will close with something on-topic. I've been putting together a video that shows how I chose to install the SEASONIC. It also shows how I dealt with the harness. I've been using my Panasonic GH5 to shoot the video in 4K to give the best resolution possible. When done, I'll upload to YouTube and post the link in this thread. My intention for the video is to help others who want to install the SEASONIC. Although many have contributed to this thread, and I thank you all, I wish to especially thank joethezomie, superjer2000, and von for sharing their first-hand power supply replacement stories that inspired me to purchase the SEASONIC and give it a try. They are the heroes of this thread who deserve all the praise.
  5. JDW

    Modern PSU for the SE/30

    So as to not get off-topic in this thread, I have created this new thread to discuss my two defective SE/30 motherboards.
  6. I am starting this thread to see if there is some possibility of getting my two SE/30 motherboards repaired or replaced. In 2012, I went through my collection and realized I had two SE/30 logic boards which showed the Horizontal Lines (Simasimac) at cold boot. Those lines were stable on-screen and would display forever, meaning the SE/30 would never boot. Prior to 2012, I had recapped both boards but found they both had identical Simasimac symptoms. The two boards were recapped at different times, one being one of the very first SE/30 logic boards I ever recapped -- I used electrolytic capacitors at the time and a dab of hot glue to ensure the traces at the feet of the caps wouldn't break if I accidentally applied pressure on them. That board worked fine for a while and then suddenly stopped working. The other bad motherboard was acquired by me and recapped later using yellow Tantalum capacitors, thanks to Trag's capacitor replacement kit he sold back in the day (not sure if he still sells that now in 2018). At that time in 2012, I referenced my SE/30 schematics and spent many hours testing PCB trace integrity, not finding the root problem that was causing the horizontal lines on both boards. Eventually, I mentioned my two defective motherboards in the 68kMLA forum, and a forum member who I will simply name "TK" said he could fix them if I would ship them off to him. I am in Japan, and he is in the USA. I shipped both boards to TK in March 2012. I followed up with TK at various times, but ultimately it took 2.5 years before the boards were shipped back to me. Unfortunately, the boards were not packed properly, and although I was assured they worked before they were shipped, they both did not work when I received them. They showed horizontal lines at the time I received them, which is the same problem they have to this day. I am going to provide repair details now, but let it be know that I am not trying to speak negatively of TK. Rather, I simply need to state certain details as relevant facts for consideration by those who may be able to kindly assist me in repair or replacement. TK discussed some of the repairs in our forum, but sadly those threads were apparently lost in a forum disk crash some years back and I can no longer link them for you. However, I still have my old PM's from many years ago, thankfully. I will now list pertinent details from my old PMs for the purpose of showing what was diagnosed and what was repaired on my two SE/30 logic boards. Again, my aim is to provide detailed information to those of you who might have the knowledge and skill to repair these boards, keeping in mind that TK was quite skilled at repairs. March 2012: TK began exchanging PM's about SE/30 experiences and the board mistakes of others. He told me he saw one of my old YouTube videos showing a SimasiMac SE/30 logic board and that I should send him my board to see what he could to with it. That led to the beginning of my discussions with him and ultimately sending both of my boards to TK for repair. Upon receipt of my boards, TK told me, "One of your boards has almost a near short on the 5V rail. not a short-short, but a semi-short. So one of the ICs is bad somewhere. I am going to have to do micro-resistance analysis to find out where..." Some days later, TK said that the tantalum-recapped board "shows a cascading short on RP2, meaning several ceramic caps inside the filter are leaky/shorted." TK also said, "the other board (electrolytic-recapped) has a short on RP3 between 10 and 11 on a single chain and none of the others." TK used a heat gun to pull RP2 from the tantalum-recapped board, but he said that the heat sensor in that heat gun failed, causing the heat to rise above 800 degrees (°F?) and resulted in burn marks on the bottom side of that board. (Scroll to the bottom and see my board photos, one of which shows that burn mark.) TK said that his heat gun did NOT kill the board though. However, TK said that pulling RP2 did not fix the problem with that board. He did note that the "UD1 74F240 buffer is corroded pretty good" but did not say if that was a problem. TK saw some corrosion on the SIMM connectors and cleaned it. (Tantalum-recapped board) Even after cleaning the SIMM banks (tantalum-recapped board), the board would work only if both banks were used (1 bank couldn't be used, apparently due to a broken trace). Apparently, the Simasimac on this board was caused by "CASLL broken to the SIMM1 Bank A and B." (A broken trace to RAM.) I was told that this broken trace would cause the other negative side effect of being forced to use both banks instead of being able to use just 1 bank of RAM. TK determined that both boards had a bad BOURNS filter which needed replacing. He said he didn't have spare BOURNS filters to do the repair, however. I decided to wait and see if he could source them. TK uploaded a YouTube video his work on my board: TK told me (regarding which board he never made clear): "the ROM select line pulls low and right back high again and nothing happens from there. All data and address lines check out, so I know this isn't the issue. With ROM removed, select line remains high until NMI invoked, then it pulls low and holds, which is NORMAL. So the next thing I am going to do is check the overlay flag. If the overlay flag isn't being flipped, the GLU chip is bad." May 2012: With it having been more than 1 month, I decided to pay $18 to Trag, who very kindly was able to source 6 BOURNS filters and ship them directly to TK. I informed TK of the shipment. May 2014 (yes, 2 years later -- and yes, I had followed-up during those 2 years): Regarding Tantalum-recapped board: One BOURNS filter was determined to be bad and replaced. TK said there might also be "a bad GLU." A "bad trace to RAM" on the tantalum-recapped board was bad, and he soldered in a wire to fix. After those fixes, the board apparently still wasn't stable, resulting in death chimes on occasion during cold boot. August-September 2014: Apparently, the CPU was dead in one of the SE/30 motherboards. TK speculated that must have been caused from a bad PDS card, although I don't think so myself since my PDS cards work in my working SE/30s. So the cause of the dead CPU is a mystery. TK took a heat gun (now with repaired temperature sensor) and removed the 68030 CPU, then put it in another board and tested and confirmed the CPU to be bad. It was at this point TK decided to install CPU sockets to make insertion and removal easier. TK remarked that he has repaired "thousands of boards" but it was the first time he'd ever seen a failed CPU. TK said that long ago he had accidentally connected a NuBUS card into a PDS slot and fried the CPU, which is why he suspected something similar must have happened for my CPU to have been killed. (Which would of course mean that my case of having a fried CPU was actually the 2nd case TK had seen.) TK said the CPU tried to run but all the data bus I/O lines were pulled close to 1.8v when they should have been a little over 4v. That led TK to believe that they must have been shorted in some way to cause damage to the CPU. He went on to say that "the only cause for those is a voltage spike, or maybe an overload of the address/data bus" and that "it is unknown if there was any damage to any of the other ICs." TK quoted me $39.90 for a replacement 68030 CPU and sockets, which I promptly paid him via PayPal. October 2014: A certain knowledgeable forum member (currently, no longer a member) sent me a PM to say that TK had repaired both of my SE/30 motherboards. I asked him how he knew that, and he said, "I speak to TK privately 3 times per day!" I then added TK to our PM conversation and the following facts were explained to me: Tantalum-recapped board needed a BOURNS filter, which TK finally installed in Oct. 2014. (Most likely using 1 of the 6pcs purchased and shipped to TK via Trag in May 2012.) TK confirm both boards were fixed as of Oct. 2014. TK requested $75 for the repair, which included shipping. TK said he reduced the price due to the long time he had the boards. I received both boards in December 2014. Metal prongs that stick up in either side of the connector side of the board were bent due to the lack of soft packing material inside the box. I mention this not to case blame (although I certainly would have packed the box better), but rather to explain that the boards could have been damaged during transport, assuming they were perfectly fixed by TK prior to him shipping them to me. I never mentioned to TK that the boards failed testing on arrival because (1) I was already out a fair amount of money and no better than when I started, and (2) because it had taken 2.5 years. I put the boards back in their anti-static bags and stored them in my closet until now (Sept. 2018). Here are high resolution photos of the top and bottom sides of both of my boards, shot today: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/sandxdkcxdss6h1/AABOOjMnrcSKhlD1neFlHOCna?dl=0 One person based in Germany has sent me a PM about these boards; but of course, I must consider the cost of shipping. I am providing all these details primarily for his benefit, but also for others to read too. I would like to hear varied opinions. All said, I've invested $30 (cost of shipping from Japan to USA) + $18 (BOURNS) + $39.90 (new 68030 & sockets) + $75 (repair & return shipping fees) = $169.90, which doesn't include the cost for the capacitor replacement and doesn't include the cost I originally paid to get the boards in the first place. Wow! Your thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
  7. JDW

    Modern PSU for the SE/30

    The horizontal stripes do NOT go away even if I leave it alone for many minutes. I used the ROM and RAM from a known-good SE/30 motherboard which does NOT display stripes, so I know the main problem is not the ROM or RAM. And I was not using 128MB of RAM because I know first-hand how long the memory check takes with that setup. Indeed, I tested everything several years ago in vain to fix the horizontal stripes problem, before I ultimately sent them off to TechKnight for repair. He described what he repaired and even showed me a couple videos. The machine he showed me seemed to be working, but again, when the boards arrived back in my hands they were not working. Had they been properly packed I would have assumed they were never repaired. But in light of the absolutely horrible packing job, it's anybody's guess what happened to these boards. And since they both have been recapped and have socketed CPUs, I am quite down about it. I have been approached by one kind soul in Germany who offered to give them a look over. I told him I would take photos today or Monday, top and bottom of both boards, so he (or whoever else) can give the boards a visual inspection. One board is the very first board I ever recapped, so the replacement caps are electrolytics and not so lovely to behold. The other board has Trag's excellent yellow tantalum re-cap kit applied to it. I will post the photos publicly in this forum for everyone to see. I should perhaps start a new thread about that though, since this thread is about SE/30 replacement power supplies. I'm still putting together a YouTube video about that, so stay tuned.
  8. JDW

    Modern PSU for the SE/30

    I have 2 more SE/30 logic boards. These 2 logic boards have been recapped, but even after recapping I found they had Simasimac horizontal lines. Several years ago I tried everything I could think of to fix them but to no avail. So one day TeckKnight said he would try to fix them and I shipped it off to him. Long story short, it took him about 2 years to fix them because he kept having other things come up and he often just forgot about them. It was a full 2 years later, after I had followed up with him several times through those years, that he finally told me he fixed them, and I paid him and then he ship them back to me. Sadly, the two boards were not shipped with adequate packing material, only sent in antistatic bags, with the boards sitting on top of each other inside a cardboard shipping box. The metal ground fins on the connector side of one of the motherboards were bent, and I can tell you they were NOT bent when I shipped them off, nor was that how I packed them when I ship them off originally. I knew for a fact that such horrible packing would not bode well for the boards, and sure enough when I tested them, both had the same horizontal lines I saw before I ship them off 2 years earlier. I just checked them this morning and they still have the horizontal lines. It’s sad because I spent a lot of time recapping them. It’s also very, very sad because TechKight kindly installed CPU sockets for them to give me flexibility to add CPU socketed accelerators, thereby allowing me to have another card in the PDS slot. I am really bummed about this. I can’t express how disappointed I am. I never mentioned it to TechKnight or even mentioned it in this forum before. But I’m saying it now because honestly I have two boards sitting here that I don’t know how to fix, and my attempt at trusting a very knowledgeable electronics wizard in this forum took two years but still didn’t pan out. I would really love to use these boards. So if any of you have more genius about these logic board repair matters than I, perhaps you could help me find a way to get them repaired such that I wouldn’t have to wait 2 years AND they will be packed adequately to ensure they will not be broken when they arrive back in my hands. Thanks. Anyway, I did check the voltage at the floppy connector and at the 14-pin connector on the solder side of the motherboard, on both of these Simasimac boards, using the same ROM and 32MB RAM as my working SE/30 motherboard. I get 4.98V and 5.0V respectively. That has me even more depressed because these 2 nonworking Simasimac boards get the right amount of voltage while my working board which boots fine and runs fine for hours is only 4.83V. And again, that’s in the stock configuration with no accelerators and nothing in the PDS slot and no internal hard disk drive. As I was finishing off this post, I decided to put the ROM and RAM back into my working motherboard to ensure that the Simasimac boards did not harm anything. To my delight, everything is fine including the voltage at the floppy connector which is now almost exactly 5.0V! All I did was remove the ROM and all RAM and then put it back in to invoke this positive change. So I consider the matter of low-voltage resolved for now. But again, if any of you have both experience and the time to repair my two Simasimac boards, assuming you can pack them properly when you ship them back to me, I would be interested in hearing from you. Both give me the “bong“ sound when I switch the power on, but they only show horizontal lines on the CRT.
  9. JDW

    Modern PSU for the SE/30

    With the motherboard completely disconnected and measuring at the same 14-pin connector, I get 5.13V on both of the 5V lines (pins 13 & 12). This proves that it is without a doubt the motherboard itself that is pulling the voltage down to about 4.83V. But why this is happening on my motherboard and not yours still the question.
  10. JDW

    Modern PSU for the SE/30

    4.83V was what I measured 11 years ago when I was using my stock SONY PSU to drive all manner of upgrades:
  11. JDW

    Modern PSU for the SE/30

    Yes, the green PSU GND wire is securely screwed to the PSU chassis and the SE/30 chassis as shown in this photo: Yes, in my previous post I put my meter's BLACK GND probe to the GND solder joints on the back of the analog board, at the PSU power connector solder joins, to get a good ground. And this morning I measured all pins of the 14-pin connector at the back of the SE/30 Motherboard (the harness that leads from the Analog Board to the Motherboard), which you can see in the photo below: To get those measurements shown in the above photo in yellow, I put my meter's Black GND probe to one of those GND pins shown in yellow. And yes, I changed my meter's GND probe to different GND pins shown in yellow, and yes, the voltage measurements where the same, proving that all those GND points there are the same. And of course, the SEASONIC is powering all of this. Note in the analog board schematic P4 (top left), which matches pins in the 14-pin connector shown in the photo above. Von, you have a SEASONIC. Could you please check your voltages for us? Thanks.
  12. JDW

    Modern PSU for the SE/30

    I haven't yet swapped the motherboard or analog board (and my analog board is stock -- not recapped), but this time I put my meter's BLACK Ground probe to a different ground and the voltage level at the floppy connector increased. So putting your meter's Ground Probe on the screw terminals of connectors on the back of your SE or SE/30 will NOT yield the best ground. Ditto for the metal tabs that stick up off the back of the motherboard and attached to the metal chassis. Note the connections (STOCK SE/30 PSU wire colors shown in photo at left below, not SEASONIC wire colors): I measure 5.07V at the back of the analog board when using GND shown above as my Meter's Black Probe GND. (When SE/30 is powered ON, no PDS cards or internal HDD or upgrades, and 32MB RAM -- all banks filled). Now note the external floppy connector pin numbers: With my meter's ground probe connected to a ground point on the back of the analog board, and measuring at the solder side (back side) of the analog board, with SEASONIC as my PSU, I see this: Pins 10 & 6 (top row) and 15, 16, 17 & 18 (bottom row)= 4.89V, with Ground Probe on analog board solder side GND or on metal chassis where GREEN wire from PSU screws onto it) Pins 7 & 8 (top row) = 12.33V, with Ground Probe on same point(s) as the 4.89V measurement above. So I am not getting that amazing 4.97V at the floppy connector like you, but 4.89V is certainly better than the 4.7V I was measuring before with my lackluster ground. And again, measuring both Positive & Negative at the solder side of the Analog Board shows 5.07V, and I get 5.13V from the SEASONIC open-circuit.
  13. JDW

    Modern PSU for the SE/30

    Those are definitely RED wires even though there is a yellow color cast on my photos that make them look orange. Also, all wires you see in the BLACK connector photo are in their original positions EXCEPT for pin-20. Pin-20 was a BLACK/GND wire before, which I removed and I inserted the other end of the GREEN wire there to ground it. (You can see the pin numbers on my photo of the black connector if you look closely). Further evidence that my red wires are indeed red is the fact that I measure 5.13V on those wires open circuit (no load connected). If they were 3.3V wires, I would not measure 5.13V open-circuit. The output wires of my Seasonic SSP-250SUB PSU: Yellow: +12V (I used 1 wire from pin-2 and 1 wire from pin-3) Orange: +3.3V (I removed all these from the black connector) Red: +5V (I used 1 wire from pin-9 and the 1 wire from pin-21) Purple: +5V (I removed all this from the black connector) Gray: +5V (I removed this from the black connector) Blue: -12V (I used this from pin-13) Black: (-) Ground (I used pin-1, pin-5, 2 wires in pin-6 & pin7 -- total of 5 ground wires). Green: Pin-25, which I connected to pin-20 that was previously GND. (Shorted to (-) Ground for the PSU to operate.) I will now need to make additional measurements, and swap the motherboard and analog board to know more. I will then report back.
  14. JDW

    Modern PSU for the SE/30

    Thank you for the reply. I definitely did not use the Seasonic’s purple wire or the orange 3.3v wires. After plugging in the appropriate wires into the stock SE/30’s PSU plastic connector, I used my meter to check all of the voltages in that connector on three separate occasions before I even put it into my SE/30. I get 5.13V with the Seasonic in a no load condition, but only 4.7V at the floppy connector when it’s inside my SE/30 and booted. I am in Japan and we have 100VAC at 60Hz, But that small drop in voltage relative to the US should not cause only my 5V line to be low, especially when the 12V line voltage is the same as what you’re reading. The screen is bright and I did not notice any glitches or freezes or shutdowns during my testing of the SE/30. I had it booted and running for a couple hours and ran extensive benchmarking repeatedly with Norton Utilities during that time, but again there were no problems. I have nothing connected to the 3.3V lines, and since you did not need that resistor, it’s hard to believe mine would need a load resister on them. If indeed the theory about the load resistor on the 3.3V lines is correct, why then am I able to measure 12.3V at the floppy connector? In other words, if my Seasonic power supply is unstable due to the lack of a load resistor on the unused 3.3V lines, I would expect the 12V lines to be affected as well, but they are not. My analog board is not recapped, but you said you checked the voltage at the floppy port before you recapped your analog board and found it to be a rock solid 5V. So I’m not sure what to think.
  15. JDW

    Modern PSU for the SE/30

    Fellow SEASONIC users, what are your voltage measurements at the SE/30's external floppy connector? I get 12.3V, which is good for the 12V line, but all the 5V lines at the floppy connector measure 4.71V. I never saw voltage drop that low (steady-state) even when I had my old stock PSU's inside. (My meter's BLACK ground probe was inserted into one of the floppy port connector's bolts.) SEASONIC open circuit (no load) voltage on the 5V lines is about 5.13V. (My old SONY PSU's 5V lines measured about 5.45V open circuit.) I have nothing connected in the PDS slot. I have all RAM banks filled for a total of 32MB RAM. No internal HDD. I am booting off an external SCSI HDD inside an Apple zero footprint HDD enclosure. Voltages at the floppy connector with the power switched on are the same even without the external HDD connected and without keyboard and mouse connected. Despite the low voltage, the SE/30 boots just fine and I ran Norton Utilities System Info benchmark app just fine. I've not yet tested PDS cards. My Analog Board is stock. I've not recapped it yet. SE/30 logic board has been recapped though. My low 4.71V measurement has me concerned and is why I am curious about YOUR voltage measurements at the external floppy connector. Just insert a paperclip into the pin hole you want to test if your probe isn't thin enough to fit into the hole, and please let me know if your 5V lines are as low as mine. I'm concerned that 4.7V is a bit too low. Thanks.
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